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Full text of "Southern Illinois Normal University. Information Service news release."

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PROPERTY OF 

SOUTHERN .ILLINOIS 

UNIVERSITY 

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CAKBONDALE. ILLINOIS 






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Southern Illinois Formal University Information Service 
Lorena D^umnond , -^cloor 



Special to 'Southern Illinois 



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Carbondalef 111., July - June was dry but the temperature ranged from 
cool to hot in Southern Illinois, a Southern .Illinois formal University weather 
6*o serve r - r ep o r t s . 

'Refeor&s at the U. S. > airway weather station he^e at the University showed 
the thermometer climbed from 47 degrees to 96 in June, as compared to a high 
of 34 and a low of 43 in May, and 91 and 48 respective!*/ in June a. 3 r ear ago. 

Rainjfefal.1 3ie::e on the University campus^ totaled only 1.19 inches, a fourth 
as much as in Kay and about a tenth of the June, 1945, precipitation. In May 
4.85 inches of rain fell here while in June a year ago the rainfall totaled 
11.24 inches. 

The University weather station, directed by Dr. Thomas F. Da,rton, professor 
of geography j takes weather observations every six hours, filing them with the 
U. S. Weather Bureau for 'immediate distribution to airports all over the country, 
Although a network of such v/eather stations is spread all over Illinois, this is 
one of about a half dozen in the state which takes six— hour readings. 

"We are a 'sending' station, not a 'receiving 1 one," Dr. Barton explained, 
"so our reports show the v/eather conditions right here on the campus. 

"It is likely that our temperature readin s correspond fairly well with 
those for a substantial section of Southern Illinois, but the rainfall may vary 
from light showers in one locality to a heavy downpour a few miles away." 



Garbondale, 111., July - Miss Lelah Allison, instructor in English 
at Southern Illinois formal University, has been notified that her article, 

mm S cm.': beast ern Illinois," has been accented -for: -"/Lieaticn in 

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Erora Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena I>rummond, Editor 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 

Carbondale, 111., July - The Southern Illinois Normal University All-Stars 
took it on the chin from the Alton Onlzed nine "by a score of 6 to 3 on the 
loser's diamond here Saturday, June 29. The winners garnered eight hits off the 
offerings of Edwards, the losing hurler, while the locals touched Lester, the 
Alton twirl or, for only five. 

The All-Stars were made up of a group of the University's intramural 
players who were selected "by the captains of the intramural squads. This contest 
marked the first of the season for the All-Stars. 

Alton's big gun was Lovo Dallape, former basket ball star, who rapped two 
of his team's eight hits and scored two of their tallies. For Southern, Salmons 
connected twice, driving out two doubles. 

The contest started off as a slugfest, with Alton counting tiro runs in the 
first half of the initial inning and Southern Baras roaring back with three runs 
in the home half of the first, but both pitchers settled down after that and 
runs were scarce. 

Edwards was touched for two in the third and two more in the seventh, but 
Lester had evidently found the right combination as he shut the door in the 
face of the Southerners for the remainder of the game. 

Edwards walked one and struck out one, while Lester fanned seven and gave only 
one. nan free transportation. 

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SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 
UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 






Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Urummond, Editor 



Carbondale, 111., July - A three-day Aviation Education 
Conference will open at Southern Illinois Normal University Wednesday, 
July 10. 

Theme of the meeting will be "Education for the Air Age," the 
program being designed to show how aviation progress affects public 
school education, according" to Delmar ./. Olson, program chairman. 

Conferees — school teachers and administrators from Southern 
Illinois — will be welcomed by University President Chester F. Lay. 

Wednesday morning speakers will be tfard N. Black, assistant state 
superintendent of public instruction, on "Education for the Air Age," 
and Horace Gilbert, Civil Aeronautics Authority educational consultant, 
on "The Federal Government and Civilian Education." 

Arrangements have been made at the local airport for those 
attending the conference to take plane rides during the afternoon 
Wednesday. 

On Thursday, a demonstration of Army Air Forces training aids 
will be shown prior to the opening session at 10 a. m. 

Roy Mertes, associate director of the school and college service 
of United Airlines, will be the featured speaker at the joint program 
for conference delegates and University students at the 10 o'clock 
Student Assembly period. 

A representative of the Army Air Forces will lecture on 
"A.A.F. Training Aids for the Public School," at 11 o'clock. 

Group discussions on aviation in the public schools will occupy 
the afternoon, and conferees will attend a dinner at the University 
cafotoria at 6 p. m. , at which Mr. Mertes will speak on "Social- 
Economic Implications of .Aviation Progress." 

On Friday the conference will move to the Parks Air College in 
East St. Louis, for a tour of the college, the air terminal and air- 
craft sales center, lunch at the college cafeteria, and informal 

discussions led by college staff members on "Present and Future 
Developments in Aviation," "Personal Flying," and "Airport Planning." 

The conference is sponsored jointly by the University College 
of Education and the Civil Aeronautics authority. Sessions on the 
campus will be held in Shryock Auditorium." 

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Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond , Editor 



Carbondale , 111., July - An exhibit of books and educational 
supplies will be shown at Southern Illinois Normal University July 
9-11, Dr. Emerson Hall, associate professor of rural education, has 
announced. 

More than 60 companioshave sent in materials to be shown in 
the exhibit, the 11th annual one held at the University and the 
largest ever held here, Dr. Hall explained. 

School administrators from all over Southern Illinois have been 
invited to attend the exhibit. A banquet has been arranged for 
Wednesday evening, July 10, at 6 p. m. in the University cafeteria. 

Classes of University students training to become teachers will 
also attend the exhibit in order to become familiar with the books 
and other teaching supplies which are on the market. 

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Carbondale, 111,, July - Southern Illinois school teachers 
and administrators enrolled in the Health Education Workshop at 
Southern Illinois Normal University will go to the opera--as part of 
their classwork* 

A group of the Health Education Workshop students who are 
particularly interested in recreation as a phase of health e ducation 
will charter a bus this week to go to St. Louis to see "The Merry 
Widow" on July 13. 

Other University students, members of the Association of 
Childhood Education, will also join the party. About 45 or 50 are 
expected to make the trip. 



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______ Normal University 

Information Service CARBONDALE - Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. CnKaUMnHMHMB^Hnn^nK^^HH 



Carbondale, 111., July - Appointment of Dr. Maurits Kesner, 
native of Holland, who combines extensive professional musical 
experience with high academic training and broad teaching experience, 
as professor of music and chairman of the music department at 
Southern Illinois Normal University has been announced by University 
President Chester F. Lay. 

Dr. Kesner obtained the master 1 s diploma from Royal 
Conservatory in Amsterdam, then took the master's and doctor of 
philosophy degrees from the State University of Iowa. 

A professional violinist, he has been a member of the Amsterdam 
Symphony Orchestra, the Royal Dutch Orchestra, the Wiesbaden 
Symphony Orchestra, the Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra and the New 
York Stadium Orchestra. 

In addition he has had experience as a choral director, and has 
published numerous musical compositions. 

He will come to Southern this fall from Augustana College at 
Rock Island, 111., where he has done outstanding work as director of 
the school of music. He formerly taught at Phillips University, 
Enid, Okla. 

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— _ __ Normal University 

Information Service CARBONDALE - Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. BMBIHBmBBHBnn^ni^B 




Carbondale, 111,, July - A faculty of 12 members to serve in 
conducting workshop, tutorial and seminar courses: — particularly for 
veterans — during the period August 5-30 has been appointed at 
Southern Illinois Normal University, President Chester F. Lay 
announces. 

Two of the members were appointed some months ago — Dr. Douglas 
E. Lawson and Dr. Ted Ragsdale, professors of education--but due to 
the demand on the part of student veterans for additional work the 
University president requested the Teachers College Board for 
permission to make further expansion of the August offerings. 

Other faculty members to serve during August are: Fount G. 
Warren, professor of education; Dr. John R. Mayor, professor of 
mathematics; Lei and P. Lingle, associate professor of physical 
education; Dr. William N. Schneider, associate professor of English; 
Dr. William A. Pitkin, associate professor of social science; John 
I.Wright, associate professor of history; Robert W. English, 
assistant professor of industrial education; Dr. Raymond W. Esworthy, 
assistant professor of business and economics; Ben Uatkins, assistant 
professor of artj and Dr. E. C, McDonagh, assistant professor cf 
sociology. 

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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Carbondale, 111., July -Dates for the annual homecoming of 
former students at Southern Illinois Normal University have been set 
for November 1 and 2, University President Chester F. Lay has announced, 

One of the major features of the reunion celebration will be the 
football game on Saturday afternoon between the Southern Maroons and 
Eastern Illinois State Teachers College.. 

Dr. Qrville Alexander, professor of government and director of 
alumni services, is faculty chairman of homecoming arrangements. 



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Carbondale, 111*, July -The Fulkersons really have a flair for 
figures. 

Three members of the same faculty family at Southern Illinois 
Normal University were initiated into Delta Rho, professional 
mathematics fraternity, here this week, joining a fourth member of the 
clan elected several years ago. 

Elbert Fulkerson, assistant professor of mathematics in University 
high school, and his son and daughter--Ray and. June, both University 
students--were initiated at the same time, Mr. Fulkerson as an 
honorary member. ■ n 

Merle, a 1940 graduate of Southern, who has been teaching 

mathematics at Belleville high school and was recently elected to teach 
speech in Belleville Junior College, was elected to .Delta Rho, while in 
school here* 

SOUTHERN TT T " 
• UNlVtiJ&U'Y LIBRARY 



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Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



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Carbondale, 111., July — Ceramic sculptures "by Lois Mahier, assistant professor 
of art at Louisiana State University, are "being exhibited in the Little Gallery 
at Southern Illinois Normal University by the University art department throughout 
the month of July, 

Art exhibits are held at various intervals in Southern's Little Gallery, 
located on the second floor of the Main Building, and all visitors are welcome. 

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Carbondale, 111., July — A County Superintendents Conference, called by 
State Superintendent of Public Instruction Vernon L. Nickell, will be held at 
Southern Illinois Normal University, Tuesday, July 30, University President 
Chester F. Lay has announced. 

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Carbondale, 111., July —Dr. Robert E. McNicoll, associate professor of 
history at Southern Illinois Normal University, haa been appointed editor of the 
section, "Colonial Hispanic America," in the Handbook of Latin American Studies , 
according to recent announcement from the President 1 s Office. 

This publication, which is published annually by the Library of Congress, 
was established in 1937 and was published for five years by Harvard University. 

In 1941 it was taken over by the Library of Congress and the Joint Committee 

on Latin America. The book is a guide to the material published each year on 

Latin America. 

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Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorcna Drunnond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondalc, 111., July — -A one-day health conference and school of instruction 
sponsored "by the Illinois Congress of Parents and Teachers will be held at 
Southern Illinois Normal University July 26. 

The conference-school is conducted annually at the University for teachers 
and for ICPT officers and connittee chairnon dealing with such fields as safety, 
exceptional children, mental hygiene, health and parent-education. 

A symposium on the topie? "Building for Tomorrow," will comprise the program 
for the morning session, under the direction of Mrs. P. E. Peterman of Downers 
Grove, vice president of the ICPT department of health and home service. 

Speakers will include Mrs. Prank Dowd of Winnetka, ICPT safety chairman; 
Bay Graham of the Division of Special Education, Str.te Department of Public 
Instruction; Dr. Lon Morrey of Chicago, director of health education for the 
American Dental Association; Mrs. W. F. Krahl of Chicago, ICPT mental hygiene 
chairman; Mrs. Everett F« Butler of Alton, ICPT health and summer round-up 
chairman; and Dr. Marie hinrichs, director of health service and professor of 
physicology and health education at the Universtiy. 

A parent-teacher school of instruction for local leaders will be held in 
the afternoon, and a number of round table section meetings will be conducted 
Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 



Miss Madeleine Smith, assistant professor of languages at Southern Illinois 
Normal University, is en route to Prance on a good-will trip as a guest of 
the Franech government. 

She was one of 100 American teachers of French chosen by the Cultural 
Counsellor of the Franch Embassy in this country to make the two-months 1 
tour. Several of the teachers will make the trip together. 

Miss Smith joined the Southern faculty in 1929. From April, 1943, to 
Novcmbor, 1945, she was a member of the Signal Corps of the War Department in 
Washington, D. C. She returned to Southern last December. 

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^ mmm ^^ mmm — m mmmm mmmm m Southern Illinois 

an Normal University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■mHBHHMHBHI^ HHn i 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 

Carbondale, 111., July — A Souchern Illinois Heslth Conference 
and school of instruction for officers and committee chairman of the 
Illinois Congress of Parents and Teachers, and for teachers themselves, 
will be held Friday, July 26, at Southern Illinois Normal University, 

Friday morning the conference will meet jointly with the Health 
Education Workshop currently in session at the University, and in 
the afternoon will hold a parent-teacher school of instruction for 
local leaders and round-table sessions on safety, the exceptional 
child, parent education, mental hygiene, and health. 

••Speakers at the morning session will be Mrs. E. E. Peterman, 
Downers' Grove; L:,rs. Paul Barrett, Carbondale; Kro . Frank Dowd, 
■-w"innetka; Mrs. W. F. Trahl, Chicago; krs. Everett F. Butler, Alton, 
all of the .Illinois Congress of Parents and Teachers; Ray Graham, 
Springfield,. Division of Special Instruction, State Department of 
Public Instruction ', Dr. Lon I.orrey, Chicago,, director of health 
education for the American Dental. Association; and Dr. Marie Hinrichs, 
professor of physiology and health education at the University. 

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Carbondale, III. r July -^Threc classes at Southern Illinois Normal 
University took a three-day trip over the pa^t week-end to .study the 
natural life at ftoelfoot Lake near Tiptonville, Tenn. 

A graduate class in. limnology (fresh water life), an undergraduat 
class in birds, and a high school biology class made the trip by 
chartered bus. 

Accompanying the students were faculty members Dr.. Willard M. • 
Gersbacher, Kiss Hilda jtein, Miss Martha Scott, William foarberry 
and J^rs. Audrey Lindsey. 

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^ mtmmm ^ ^^ B—B _ _ i— B— Southern Illinois 

_________ Normal University 

Information Service CARBONDALE ' Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. MHagMHM^MIH^^Mi 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 

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Carbondale, 111., July — Representatives of the Federal Public i 

Housing Authority and Belleville contractors employed by FPHA for 

the Southern Illinois Normal University veterans housing project were 

here today and informed University authorities the FPHA would start 

operations on the project August 1, President Chester F. Lay has 

announced. 

The only work to be done by the University prior to moving in 
the housing units, University officials were informed, will be too 
smooth the site. Electrical, water, sewa~e, and gas facilities can 
be installed as the units are being remodeled, it was explained. 

Negotiations were completed early this week between the FPHA 
and University and State of Illinois officials for the location of 
35 barrach-type units, just west of the campus, to house 105 student 
veterans and their families. 

Early award by the State Department of Architecture and 
Engineering of contracts for installation of unitities and construction 
of roads and walks for the project is expected. 

The FPHA will convert each of the barracks into three 
two-bedroom apartments. 

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Southern Illinois 



Southern Illinois 



University 



Information Service CARBONDALE ' i"«oii 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^j^^^^^ ^j^^^^ mmm>mlmmm bbbmbbii 



Carbondale, 111., July -There are approximately 1,500 crippled 
children in the 16 counties of Southern Illinois, Miss Grace Borah, 
of Mt. Vernon, district orthopedic nursing consultant of the 
University of Illinois Division of Services for Crippled Children, 
told a Southern Illinois Normal University Health Education Workshop 
here Tuesday. 

Miss Borah pointed out that four out of each 1,000 children are 
crippled, and only one of the four shows up at the crippled children's 
clinics for diagnosis and treatment. 

She declared that teachers and nurses are not exerting enough 
care to encourage parents to bring crippled children to the clinics. 

Among the cases brought to the Southern Illinois clinics at 
Mt. Vernon, Shawnee town and Cairo are children with cleft plates, 
hearing difficulties, epilepsy, rheumatic fever, heart ailments, etc. 

Miss Borah was one of several experts in the care of handicapped 
children brought to work with the students in the Workshop during the 
first three days of this week. 

The others were Miss Jeannette Frasier, supervisor of speech and 
hearing rehabilitation of the University of Illinois Division of 
Services for Crippled Children; Miss Martha Black from the State Office 
of Public Instruction; and Mrs. Jewell Hopkins of the Carbondale 
public schools, who with her class presented a demonstration of 
corrective techniques for speech defects. 



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Normal TTvi;tt^v«Ut, ' 



Information Service 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED, 



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Mss Frasier attributed the majority of speech defects to the 
following causes: poor speech models (in the family), poor teaching 
methods; bi-lingualism in the home; efforts to change left-handed 
children to right-handed ones; emotional difficulties; ill health; 
hearing deficiencies; mental deficiencies; short span of memory; 
organic mal- format ions of lips, mouth, teeth, throat, nose; 
accidents and injuries; aphasia caused by injury to the brain; 
endocrine disturbances; poor motor coordination. 

She said that the commonest types of speech defects are: poor 
art ic ulation- -about #5 per cent of all defects found in school 
children are due to poor articulation; cleft palate, lack of 
muscular coordination, stuttering and hearing losses. 

She urged the use of state services for remedial treatment 
and the development of community and parental recognition of the 
need for such treatment. 

kiss Black described the processes by which counties and 
schools may obtain the services of state agencies in the care 
of handicapped children. 

The Health Education Workshop, one of the two being conducted 
in the State of Illinois this summer by the U. S. Office of 
Public Health and the State Department of Public Health, has 
brought more than 50 school teachers of Southern Illinois here on 
$100 scholarships to study health education methods. 

Administrators from 34 Southern Illinois counties will attend 
the last three days of the workshop session next week, with 
expenses paid by the State Department of Public Health. All 
county superintendents of the 34 counties are invited and 45 city 
superintendents, high school principals and elementary school 
principals. 



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Information Service 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 









Carbondale, 111., July --Many rare "books once owned by Dr. Delia Caldwell » 
former physiciaa at Southern Illinois Normal University, are now located in the 
University's Clint Clay Tilton library here, according to Dean E. G. Lentz, 
director. 

Dean Lentz made a visit to the Caldwell home in Carbondale about two weeks 
ago to obtain some documents concerning early history of Southern, and was 
surprised and pleased to be told that he could take any of Dr. Caldwell' s books 
that he might wish to. He accepted approximately 96 books and pamphlets. 

Three volumes of which he is especially proud are illustrated by Gustave 
Dore, who also illustrated Dante's Inferno. The: 7 are Edgar Allen Poe's The , 
Rrven, a huge volume; a copy of The Wandering Jew : an d The Fables of Jean de 
la Fontaine . translated into English verse by Walter Thorn sbury, a limited 
edition. 

A curiosity is ! The Schoolmaster' s Assistant by Thomas Dilworth, a volume 
published in 1812 with title page bearing the legend," containing a compendious 
system of practical guaring. " 

McGuffey's Third Reader , an early edition, is there, as is an 1810 edition 
of Thompson' s The Seasons . 

Dr. Caldwell's diploma of her graduation from Southern Illinois Normal 
University, dated 1878, is singularly interesting and is also of historical 
significance. It states that she was graduated from the "classical" courset 
a few of the requirements af, which were study of astronomyi advanced mathematics, 
three years of Latin, two years of Greek. At that time students entered 
Southern from the eight grade, since there were very few high schools in Southern 
Illinois. 

A CTuhe 13, 1878, copy of the Carbondale Observer gives the names of the 
graduating class of that year. 

Dr. Caldwell's posthumous gift is the most recent addition to the Clint 
Clay Tilton library. Mr. Tilton, 76, retired Danville newspaperman, died at 
his home in Danville recently. He made the gift of his library — some 2,000 
volumes— to Southern in October, 1944. Also included were 20 sectional 
bookcases, many uictures, plaques, and busts. 

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^_ i— ^^^^^^^^^^^^ Southern Illinois 

________ Normal University 

Information Service CARBONDALE - Illinois L 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. IHHWHJllftl lilllllMI— H—MHIMiMMII— 1—11— ■ 



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Carbondale, 111., July -Appointment of Hiss Elizabeth Opal 
Stone as assistant professor at Southern Illinois ITormal University- 
has been announced by University President Chester F, Lay. 

Miss Stone will be assigned to the Wheeler library. 

She holds the bachelor of science degree from Northwest Missouri 
State Teachers College, and the bachelor's and master's degrees in 
library science from the University of Illinois. 

Miss Stone has taught and served in the libraries at the 
University of Illinois and the University of Southern California, 
and comes to Southern from the University of Dubuque, Iowa, where 
she has been head librarian. 

She was on the Southern staff from 1929 to 1936. 












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i ^^ — ^ mi ^ mm ^^ Southern Illinois 

-_-_____ Normal University 
Information Service CARBONDALE - Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■■■■■■■■■■■■I^EBnHB 



Carbondale, 111., July -The role of two State departments — 
public instruction and public health — in the school health program 
was discussed before an administrator's Workshop in Public Health 
Education here at Southern Illinois Normal University Monday. 

The workshop will run through Friday, with 34 county 
superintendents, 39 city superintendents and high school principals, 
and six building principals in attendance. 

The administrator's workshop concludes a six-weeks' Health 
Education Workshop conducted at the University during the summer 
term by the U. S. Public Health Service, the State Department of 
Public Health, the State Department of Public Instruction and the 
University. 

University President Chester F. Lay welcomed the administrators 
Monday morning. Dr. Eugene R. Fair, dean of the College of 
Education, acted as chairman for the morning session which developed 
the them "Joint planning for School Health in Southern Illinois," 

Speakers were Dr. Leslie W. Knott, medical administrative 
assistant for the Illinois Department of Public Health, and Foster 
Keagle , assistant director of health and physical education for the 
Illinois Department of Public Instruction. 

At the afternoon session, presided over by Miss Florence Denny, 









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assistant professor of physiology and health education, speakers 
were Glen Fiscus, Lawrencevilie, Lawrence County school gaperiritond&n 
superintendent, who presented films on health education and a field 
day in Lawrence County, and Dr. Douglas E. Laws on, University 
professor of education, who spoke on "An Educator Views the School 
Health Program." 

Round table discussion groups were held Tuesday morning on 
nutrition, mental hygiene, social hygiene, planning of school health 
curriculum, and recreation. 

On Wednesday morning, Dr. Eleanore Aldworth, teaching 
supervisor of Onondaga County Health Association, Syracuse, N. Y., 
a visitin_. associate professor of physiology and health education 
at the University this summer, will speak on "The Present Status of 
the School Health Program." 

Panel discussions of the school health program will follow on 
Wednesday morning and Wednesday afternoon. 

On Thursday afternoon, Lester F. Boyd, chief, Division of Local 
Health Administration, Illinois Department of Public Health, will 
speak on "The School and the Community Working Together for a Better 
Health Program." 

Friday morning a panel discussion on ''Evaluation of the Public 
Health Education Workshops as a Stimulating Factor in Promoting 
Better Health in School and Community" will be presented with Frank 
Bridges, instructor and coach of University High School at Southern 
Illinois Normal University, Dr. Marie A. Hinrich, professor and 
chairman of the University department of physiology and health 
education, and H. 0. Belford, superintendent of the Marion Public 
Schools, as speakers. 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 






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Carbondale, 111., July — Friendship and cooperation of Latin America is worth 
hundreds of million dollars to the United States in time of war, and an incalculable 
amount in times of peace, a Southern Illinois Normal University professor told the 
Carbondale Businessmen' s Association here this week. 

Dr. Robert D. McNicoll, new associate professor of Latin-American history at 
the University, pointed out that Latin America is struggling to feel its way toward 
development of its vast natural resources and toward political maturity, and that 
it is up to the United States to convince its people that our democratic way of 
life is adaptable for Latin America. 

"Why is Latin America important to us?" he asked. "Because in our growing 
concept of 'one world,' Latin America is the section of the world that is closest 
to us, 

"It has an area three times the size of the United States, a population roughly 
corresponding to our own, more unexploited natural resources than any other 
territory' in the world, 

"Will it be the United States — its economic, political and cultural thinking — 
that will dominate this vast region, or some other country?" 

Latin America wants to develop its natural resources, ho declared, and see its 
own people benefit from those resources. It wants to get out of the rut of a 
"colonial economy", in which its chief products — coffee and cocoa — are subject to 
the fluctuations of a world market over which Latin America has no control. It 
wants to "come of age 'politically." 

Latin America wants the United' Statos to lend the money for this development, 
but not at the expense of a "lien of its future." Dr. McNicoll explained that by 
this he meant that Latin America wants the money on such long-range terms that its 
repayment will not disrupt the new development just as they are getting started. 

Latin America wants people from the United States to co.'e to Latin America, 
"but not as visitors," investing money in Latin-American enterprises, making a 
quick fortune, then taking that fortune out of the country. 

The factors that make it hard for Latin America to "got .along" with the United 
States, he caid, are: 

(l) "They don't know enough about us." They think North Americans are money- 
grubbers, and have no culture. North Americans who visit Latin America usually 
cannot speak Spanish, and cannot address groups of Latin-American intellectual 

and business leaders, 

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(2) Our cultures are different. That of L atin America stems from Europe, from 
France and Spain. Latin Americans arc not familiar with our background, nor arc 
we with theirs. 

The United States wants from Latin America: (l) their friendship and * 
understanding; (2) their admiration and liking for the democratic way of life, 
which, Dr. McNicoll pointed out, "we honestly "believe is the best system in the 
world for the common man"; (3) their trade. 

"Latin America as a whole is not yet entirely friendly to the United States," 
the historian coutioned. "The people arc not yet convinced that our way of life — 
the democratic way — is a way that is applicable to Latin America. 

" Our people haven't sent leaders there who can make themselves felt and 
understood by the Latin-Americans as other countries have." 

To attain Latin America's friendship, her conversion to the democratic w R y of 
life, and her trade, Dr. McHicoll advocated the exchange of students, professors, 
newspaper men, writers, and other leaders — but particularly students. 

"Every student who comes to North America for his education is a center for 
the spread of North American culture and ideas when he returns home," he asserted. 
"It would cost less to bring 1,000 students from Latin America to study here than 
it would to build one battleship." 

(Recently District 149 of Rotary International established a scholarship fund 
to bring students from Latin American countries to Southern Illinois Normal 
University.) 

"The Latin-American people are trying to feel their way toward 'eraocracy," 
he concluded. "It's up to us to help them, to give them every change to understand 

the American way of life — and they will respond." 

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Carbondale, 111., July - Robert D. Gallegly of Carbondale has been 
appointed to the post of chief accouutant at Southern Illinois Normal University, 
President Chester F, Lay has announced. 

Mr. Gallegly, who has already assumed his duties at the University, will take 
the place of Mrs. Mabel Howell, chief accountant, who has been granted a leave of 
absence for next year to continue her advanced work at Ws.ghin?rton University in 
St. Louis. 

Mr. Gallegly holds the bachelor of dducation degree from Southern and has 

much of his work completed toward the master's degree at the University of Illinois, 
For tho past four years he has been a captain in the ordnance department of the 
U. S. Army. 




Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drunriond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies and Weeklies 



Carbondale, 111., July — Appointment of an associate professor of physics, an 
associate professor of English, and an instructor in agriculture at Southern 
Illinois Normal- University has been announced by University President Chester F. Lay. 

These three — Dr. Or, M. Wissink in physics, Dr. E. C. Colenan in English, and 
Alex Reed in agriculture — will report for duty this fall. 

Dr. Vissink is a graduate of Hope College (Mich.), has clone graduate work at 
the University of Illinois, and obtained both the master's and doctor's degrees 
from Iowa State Teachers College. He has had 20 years' experience in the teaching 
profession, including public schools, junior colleges and universities. He 
taught for a tine at Columbia University and recently has been at Mankato (Winn) 
State Teachers College. At present he is employed by the Consolidated Water 
Power and Paper Company. 

Dr. Coleman holds the bachelor's and doctor's degrees from the Universit; of 
Illinois, and the master's degree from the University of Wisconsin. Aft^r 
teaching at the Universitj' of Illinois, ho lias been head of the English department 
at Sul Ross State Teachers College (Texas) for the past ten years, and chairman 
of the graduate council for the past two years. 

Roed, who has taught for 17 years at Brownstown, 111*, and has served there 
as principal for the past 14 years, obtained both the bachelor of science and the 
master of science degrees from the University of Illinois. He has also done 
advanced graduate work there and at Collrado State College, 

In addition to these fall appointments, two summer visiting faculty members 
have accepted permanent appointments at Southern — Dr. Frank Klingberg as associate 
professor of government, and Dr. Henry L. Wilson as assistant professor of English. 

Dr. Klingberg, v/ho took his doctor of philosophy degree at the University of 
Chicago, came to Southern from Knox College, where he was head of the department 
of government. Dr. Wilson came from the University of Idaho. He holds the master 
of arts degree fron the University of Colorado and the doctor of philosophy 
degree from the University of Iowa. He has taught at both of these universities 
and also at Purdue University. 

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Southern Illinois Formal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



Carbondale, 111., July - Dr. Eleanor Aldworth, health teaching supervisor 
in Onandaga County, N. Y., has joined the staff of the health education workshop 
at Southern Illinois Normal University for the last five weeks of the summer term, 
President Chester F. Lay has announced. 

Dr. Aldworth has been appointed as visiting associate professor of physiology 
and health education. 

She is a graduate of Teachers College, Columbia University, and received the 
doctor of public health degree from the University of Michigan. Before going to 
New York, she taught in the state teachers college at West Chester, Pcnn. 

# # # 









Carbondale, 111., July - Roy Mertes, United Airlines official, and Horace 
Gilbert, educational consultant of the Civil Aeronautics Authority, will be the 
chief speakers at a three-day Aviation Conference at Southern Illinois Normal 
University here July 10-12. 

Mr. Mertes, associate director of United Airlines' school and college service, 
will speak to the conferees and to the University student body at 10 o'clock 
Thursday morning, July 11, on the subject, "The Influence of Air Transportation on 
our Economy," and that evening will give a lecture at the conference dinner on 
"Social-Economic Implications of Aviation Progress." 

Mr. Gilbert will be one of the morning speakers at the opening session on 
Wednesday, July 10, taking as his subject "The Federal Government and Civilian 

> 

Aviation." 

Designed for teachers in the public schools, the conference will emphasize the 
opportunities for the use of aviation and aviation materials in the classroom. 

On Friday, the conferees will be taken to East St. Louis for an all-day tour 

and program at the Parks Air College. 

# # # 




Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Release Wednesday p. m. 



Carbondale, 111.* July 10 -Safety is the No. 1 objective of the Federal 
government's promotional and regulatory activities for civil aviation, Horace 
Gilbert, educational consultant for the Civil Aeronautics Administration, told 
Southern Illinois school administrators and teachers here today. 

Gilbert was one of the opening speakers at a three-day Aviation Education 
Conference jointly sponsored by the C.A.A. and the College of Education at 
Southern Illinois Normal University. 

The conference was opened this morning as conferees wore welcomod by 
University President Chester F. Lay. 

Dr. E. R. Fair, dean of the University College of Education, spoke briefly on 
the purposes of the conference, designed to acquaint teachers and school 
administrators with the opportunities for incorporating aviation in the school's 
instructional program. 

Ward N. Black, assistant superintendent of public instruction, addressed 
the conference on "Education for the Air Ago." 

Gilbert reported that by 1940 there was a total of 1,824 airports of all 
types in this country, "while today there are 4,028." 

"We no\<t have 35,651 miles of lighted airways, making a veritable network of air 
highways all over our land," he explained, "and 3,839 additional miles arc now 
under construction*" 

He explained that two Federal agencies— the Civil Aeronautics Administration 
and the Civil Aeronautics Board — carry out the government's promotion and 

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regulation of civil aviation. 

"The Board is concerned principally with economic regulation, the formation 
of safety regulations, and the investigations of all accidents to civil aircraft," 
he pointed out, 

"The Civil Aeronautics Administration primarily is an operating agency and 
is a "branch of the Department of Commerce 

"The CAA operates seven main services: Federal Airways, Airports, Safety 
Regulations, Aviation Information Field Operations, Business Management and 
Aviation Training, in addition to the Washington National Airport and, the 
Standardization Center at Houston, Texas." 

Through the Office of Aviation Training, the CAA assists the states with 
their "air age" programs "by helping to conduct such conferences as the one 
currently under way at Southern. 

It also carries on an Inter-American training program, bringing promising 
young men from Central and South America to the United States, training them to 
he pilots, mechanics, air-control operators, etc. 

The aviation education conference will continue through Thursday and Friday. 
On Thursday, two addresses will he given by Roy Mertes, associate director of the 
school and college service of United Airlines, one on "The Influence of Air 
Transportation on our Economy" at the student assembly hour Thursday morning at 
10 o'clock, the other at a dinner session on "Social-Economic Implications of 
Aviation Progress." 

Demonstrations of Army Air Forces training adds will be given during the 
morning, and in the afternoon group discussions will take place on aviation in 
the classroom. 

On Friday the conference will move to East St. Louis, to spend the day at 
the Parks Air College. 

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Southern Illinois Formal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



Carbondale, 111., July 11 -"The nations of the world are closer than were the 
thirteen original American colonies—thanks to modern air transportation," said Ray 0. 
Bertes, associate director of school and college service for United Air Lines f during 
the second day of the Aviation Education Conference being hold at Southern Illinois 
Normal University. 

Mertes was one of several speakers at the conference which is jointly sponsored 
by the Civil Aeronautics Administration, and the College of Education at Southern. 
The three-day affair opened Wednesday, July 10, and will continue through Friday, 
when the group will travel to East St. Louis to spend the day at the Parks Air College 

"It is necessary that we build over 3,000 new airports and improve over 1,600 of 
the existing ports to handle the projected air traffic of the future and to realize 
the goal of having every city of 5,000 population or over enjoying air facilities," 
he said in his talk on "Social and Economic Implications of Aviation Progress." 

Mertes also spoke to the student assembly this morning at 10 o'clock. 

He pointed out that the world is growing smaller. In Ptolemy's time— 150 A.D. , 
the entire known world was the Mediterranean ocean. How, be'eause of the airplane, 
the world is again about the size of that ocean in terms of travel time. But 
because of this shrinkage, our social, political, and economic problems have 
increased many times, and the man from Europe, Asoa, Africa, and Australia is now 
out backyard neighbor." 

During the first day of the conference, Ward N. Black* assistant superintendent 
of public instruction, spoko on "Education for the Air Age," in which he discussed 
both the aims of education for the air age and the reasons why aviation education 
is important now. 

"If children are going to live in an air world, they should have a xerogram of 

education that is appropriate for an air world," he said. "The success of any program 

for the schools of tomorrow will depend to a very groat extent upon coordination of 
action on the part of the social, economic, cducationa,l political, and spiritual 
forces of each community." # # # 



Southern Illinois Norm. . I University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Release Friday: 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies & Weeklies 



Carbondale, 111., July 12 — A state warrant for §12,427 was tjday 
paid out by the State of Illinois for the purchase of the first tract 
of land purchased for Southern Illinois Normal University under its 
25-year expansion program* 

V/arrants totaling $$7j$36 were released today by Governor Dwight 
H. Green for Southern's land acquisition program, which will embrace 
a large acreage of land including ten tracts adjoining the present 
campus. 

In a cermony in the office of the President, Dr. Chester F. Lay, 
the first warrant was delivered by Frank G. TEhjmps jn, director of the 
State Department of Registration and Education and chairman ji the 
State Teachers Colle-^ Board, to Mr. and Mrs. R. R. Colp of Carbondale 

This was the first purchase of property actually completed in 
the land acquisition program for the University's #4, 623, 373 post-war 
expansion program. 

Present for the ceremony here today were Director Thompson, 
President Lay, Business manager Edward V. Miles, Jr., Gen. Robert 
W. Davis of Carbondale , member of the Teachers College Board and 
member jf the board's .advisjry committee for Southern, Mr. and Mrs. 
C olp . 



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Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



Carbondale, 111., July 17 - State officials, representatives 
of the Illinois Central Railroad and Southern Illinois Normal 
University officials met Wednesday afternoon in the office of the 
University president for a conference concerning the proposed 
re-routing of Highway 51 through Carbondale in connection with the 
forthcoming expansion of the University campus. 

Present at the session were: 

From the Division of Highways — L. J. Hills and E. R. Knight, 
Springfield, and M. P. Boulden, Carbondale. 

From the State Division of Architecture end Engineering--C. 
Herri ck Hammond, State architect; Chance S. Hill, State landscape 
architect, Oak Park, 111.; Joseph F. Boot on, chief of design, 
Chicago; Marion Jett, Springfield. 

From the State Department of Registration and Education — 
Frank G. Thompson, director and chairman of the Teachers College 
Board. 

Representing the University — Gen. Robert ?/. Davis, member of 
the Teachers College Board and member of the board's advisory 
committee for Southern; President Chester F. Lay, Business 
Manager Edward V. Miles, Jr., and Administrative Assistant to the 
President Charles D. Tenney. 

Representing the Illinois Central — C. I. Van Arsdalen and 
A. A. Logue , Carbondale, 



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Southern Illinois Formal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, Ill.t July - A series of eight radio "broadcasts in round-table 

fashion, called "New Frontiers — 1946," will be given "by Southern Illinois Normal 

/ $> 4 o 
University over radio station WJPF, Herrin (1530 k.c.) beginning Monday, July 15. 

The discussions, to be presented each Monday, Wednesday, and Friday at 3:30- 
4:00 p.m., July 15-31, will take up important topics in our world today, and will 
give a new concept of the word "frontier." "Now Frontiers— 1946" will bo a program 
of opinions by University faculty members, who are experts in their various fields 
of learning. The topics and speakers scheduled include: 

"History Lays the Foundation," July 15 — Dr. Harold E. Briggs, professor of 
history; Dr. Robert E. McNicoll, associate professor of Latin-American history; 
Dr. William A. Pitkin, associate professor of social sciences. 

"New Frontiers in Economics," July 17— Dr. Henry J. Rchn, Dean, College of 
Vocations and Professions, professor of commerce and business administration; 
Dr. Ralph R. Pickett, professor of business and economics; Dr. Raymond W. Esworthy, 
associate professor of business and economics. 

"New Frontiers in Government , " July 19— Dr. Orville Alexander, professor of 
government; Dr. Frank L. Xlingbcrg, associate professor of government; Dr. William 
A. Pitkin, associate professor of social sciences. 

"New Frontiers in Science," July 22 — Dr. T. W. Abbott, dean, College of Liberal 
Arts and Sciences, professor of chemistry; Dr. Willard M. Gersbachor, associate 
professor of zoology; Dr. 0. B. Young, professor of physics and astronomy. 

"Nov; Frontiers in Natural Resources," July 24 — Dr. Thomas F. Barton, professor 

of geography; William J. O'Neil, U. S. Forest Service, Shawnee National Forest, 

Harrisburg, 111.; Dr. Conrad White, associate professor of agriculture. 

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"New Frontiers in Business and Industry, 1 , ' ( July 26— -Dr. Ralph R. Pickett, 
professor of business and economics} Dr. Raymond W« Esworthy, associate professor 
of "business and economics; Robert V, English, assostant professor of industrial 
education. 

"ITcw Frontiers in Health," July 29 — Dr. Marie A. Hinrichs, director, Health 
Service, and professor of physiology and health education; Dr. Eleanor Aldworth, 
associate professor of physiology and health education; Miss Gladys Eaton, first 
grade teacher, Mt. Carnel Public Schools, Mt. Camel, 111.; Dollie Buzbec, 
superintendent of schools, Odin, 111. 

"How Frontiers in Education," July 31 — Dr. Chester F. Lay, president, Southern 
Illinois ITornal University; G-offrey Hughes, county superintendent, Franklin County, 
Benton, 111.; Dr. E. R. Fair, dean, College of Education, professor of education; 
Raymond H. Dey, director of extension. 

Announcer for the prograns will bo Bill Holder, University student of 
Carbondale. Robert D, Faner, associate professor of English, will act as moderator. 

Music by a student orchestra of Southern will be directed by John Wharton, 
instructor of music. 



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Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies and Weeklies 






Carlinville, 
Carbondale, 111., July -Ralph Boatman/ graduate of Southern 

Illinois Normal University who has been doing post-graduate work 

here this summer, has been awarded an $1800-per-year fellowship 

through the State of Illinois for graduate work in public health at 

the University of North Carolina. 

He received one of the two fellowships given by the State and 
was chosen from among 25 applicants. 

The terms of the award specify a stipend of $150 a month, plus 
tuition, books, and a railroad ticket to and from school. After 12 
months of training, Boatman will receive the master's degree in 
public health. He will work for the succeeding two years, after 
which he will assume another year of training. 

He is the second person from the University department of 
physiology and health education to receive one of these awards. 
Mrs. Louise O'Neill Parker was awarded a similar fellowship last 
fall and has studied this year at the University of Michigan. 

Boatman received a Navy discharge in January, after four years 
in service as a Navy pilot. 



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Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena ^rumnond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111., July — Dr. Bruce Welch Merwin, professor of education at 
Southern Illinois Normal University, has received the high honor of being listed 
in the 1946-47 edition o f Who' s Who in America . 

Born in Iola, Kansas, 1889, Dr. Merv/in received his various degrees at the 
University of Kansas — the A. B. , 1911; the B. S. in Education, 1911; the A. M., 
1924; and the Ph. D. in 1929. 

Among the positions as an educator that he has held are : teicher in Paris, 
Tennessee, and Jerome, Idaho; superintendent of schools at Savonburg and Republic, 
both in Kansas; curator of the Museum at the University of Philadelphia, 1915-19; 
and principal of the county high school at Sharon Springs, Kansas. 

He was an instructor at the University of Kansas, 1926-27, and came to 
Southern as instructor in 1927. He became director of the training schools hero 
in 1929, serving until 1944. During that year he served as acting president of 
the University. 

Dr. Merwin is a director and one of the founders of the Jackson County 
Teachers' Credit Union; is ex-president of the Southern Division of the National 
Education Association; and is a member of the Illinois State Archaeology Society, 
the American Association of School Administrators, the Society of College 
Teachers of Education, the Illinois Schoolmasters 1 Club, and the Illinois 
Elementary School Principals' Association. He has contributed articles to a 
number of magazines, and is co-author of Iiiinris , Oross-Peads of a Nation, 
historical reader for elementary schools. 

He is the only University faculty member listed in Who 1 s Who, at the present 
time. During 1946-47, Dr. Merwin will take his sabbatical years' leave, and 
attend as a research fellow the University of California in Berkeley. 



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Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111., July — Dr. W. Neal Phelps, associate professor of education 
at Southern Illinois Normal University and supervisor of student teaching in social 
studies for University High School, has "been listed in the forthcoming issue of 
Who 1 s Who in American Education . 

Dr. Phelps is a graduate of Southern, and obtained the master's degree from 
the University of Illinois and the doctor's degree from Greeley State Teachers 
College. 

He has served as athletic director at Pittsburgh (lll,)high school, and later 
as city superintendent of Pittsburgh; has taught at Benton Township High School, 
at Shelbyville High School, and at Mt. Vernon Township High School, all in the 
field of social studies. 

He is a member of Phi Delta Kappa, Kappa Delta Pi, Kappa Phi Kappa, the 
American Association of University Professors, and of the Illinois State 
Historical Society. 

f # * 



Carbondale, 111., July — Tomatoos, peaches, green beans, beets, apples, 
hominy, chickens — these food items, and many others now in season, are being 
processed each day by the Southern Illinois Normal University cannery. 

In line with National Home Pood Preservation Week, July 15 through July 22, 
and G-overnor Dwight H. Green's plea to Illinois citizens to preserve fruits and 
vegetables as their part in "producing food for themselves and for a hungry 
world," the University cannery processed a total of 237 cans last week, and 
expect to double that figure this week, according to Mrs. Mabel Caldwell, 
instructor. 

Canning is done for all within driving distance who bring their food 
prepared and packed in the cans. The actual cooking and cooling are done at 
the cannery at 6^ per tin can, 3^ per glass jar. 

* # # SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 
UNlVERSixY LIBRARY 












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Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



review by Dr. Briggs. ^ 



Carbondale, 111., July — Guided "by John W. Allen, curator of the Museum at 
Southern Illinois Normal University, the Southern Illinois Historical Society 
will sponsor a oilgrimage to the French settlements along the Mississippi on 
August 3, J. Ward Barnes of Raleigh, president of the society, has announced. 

Arrangements for the pilgrimage, which will leave the main gate of the 
University at 8 a.m., will he made by the Rev. H. J. Funke of Carbondale. 

Among the pbints of interest to bo visited are the Logan monument and marker 
at Murphysboro, Rockwood, Mansker House, Chester, Fort Gage, Prairio Du tocher, 
Fort Chartres, New Design, Belief ant ainc, Whiteside Station, Columbia and Cahokia. 

Picnic luncheon will bo eaten at Kaskaskia State Park, and dinner will be 
served- by the ladies of the church at Cahokia, at 5 p.m. In the evening a 
program will be presented by the Cahokia Historical Society. 

A special bus will be provided for those who do not drive their own cars. 
Reservations must be made with Mr. Allen by July 27. 

# * #' 

Carbondale, 111., July —First professional entertainment performance in 
Chicago was given in a private hone in February 1834, when a Mr. Bowers presented 
impersonations, ventriloquism and legerdomain. 

This is but one of the facts about the theatrical history of Chicago turned 
up by Dr. Harold E. Briggs, professor of history at Southern Illinois Normal 
University, and his wife, Ernestine B. Briggs, who are writing a book on the 
history of the frontier theater. 

Dr. and Mrs. Briggs have contributed the lead article in the current issue 
of the Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society , entitled, "The Early 
Theater in Chicago." 

The first thoater was not established in Chicago until 1837, although the 
first circus visited there a year earlier. The first impresario was Henry (or 
Harry Isherwood, who opened his theater in October, 1837, probably offering 
"The Stranger" as the first play. The following spring he began construction of 
a permanent theatrical h^use, variously called the Rial to, the Chicago, the 
National, or the People's Theater— and located on the second floor of a wooden 
building on the west side of Doarborn Street. 

Also included in the current issue of the historical journal is a book 



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Southern Illinois 
1 . Normal University 

T r , . o ■ CARB.ONDALE, ILLINOIS 

Intormation bervice 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Carbondale, 111., July 22 - A veterans housing project to 
' accommodate 105 student veterans and their families, will be erected 
on West Chautauqua Street, a short distance from the campus of 
Southern Illinois Normal University, University President Chester F. 
Lay announced today. 

Contract has been signed by University and state officials with 
the Federal Public Housing Authority to set up the emergency housing 
project, and steps are being carried forward by the State Department 
of Architecture and Engineering to award site preparation contracts 
immediately. 

The contract with the FPHA, President Lay explained, calls -for 
bringing in 35 -..barracks each 100 feet in size and each to be 
converted into three apartments, a total of 105. 

The University is responsible for providing water, gas, sewage, 
and electrical facilities, as well as roads and walks, which are 
estimated to cost $34,200. Toward, this expense, the FPEh will 
contribute $5,250. 

In addition, the University will maintain and operate the 
project. 

The FPHA will assume costs of dismounting -the barracks at their 
present location, transporting them to Carbondale, and re-erecting 
them. The FPHA. will also pay for certain site improvement costs and 
contractual expenses. Total costs of the project to the Federal 
government are estimated at approximately $262,000. 

The housing project here embraces S5 family housing units 
allocated by the FPHa to the University for veteran student families, 
plus 20 units allocated to the city of Carbondale and transferred 
with FPHa consent by Carbondale to the University. The latter 20 may 
be used by the University to house either faculty veterans or student 
veterans, Dr. Lay pointed out. Faculty housing is also critical, and 
unless additional faculty can be secured the instruction for incoming 
veterans may be hampered. 

Each of the apartments in the project will provide two bedrooms 
with a closed in e^h, a kitchenette, dining-living room, a linen 









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Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 






closet and bath. Each will be heated by gas and have electricity, 
and hot and cold water. 

Furnishings for the apartments will be supplied by the University, 
largely by surplus material s from the FPHa. 

Site of the new housing project is jus t_ west of the University 
campus, at the intersection of Lake and West Chautauqua streets and 
adjacent to the University baseball field. 

This project is one which President Lay and other University 
authorities have been working on for many months. Last January the 
University first filed application for emergency housing with the FPHa, 
as soon as the State Teachers College Board gave its approval to the 
enterprise. 

First approval from the FPHa came for 55 family housing units, 
and subsequent allotments brought the University 1 s total to 189, plus 
the 20 from the City of Carbondale, a grand total of 209. 

It was stipulated by the Federal government that housing units 
allotted to an educational institution must be located at any military 
or government pro jectwithin25 miles of the campus, if such project 
had been declared surplus. This meant that the housing units allotted 
to the University must be located at the Illinois Ordnance Plant at 
Crab Orchard, which is only about 12 miles from the campus. 

Later developments revealed considerable doubt as to what parts 
of the Illinois ordnance plant will- be declared surplus. Moreover, 
family housing units totaling only approximately 104 could be 
provided at the ordnance plant, and permission was finally given to 
locate the remainder of the University's 209 units here in Carbondale, 
Dr. Lay explained. 

Negotiations are still going forward in connection with efforts 
to secure 104 family housing units and dormitory accommodations for 
306 single student veterans at the ordnance plant. 

University officials declined to commit themselves as to just 
when the Chautauqua Street housing project would be avcilable for 
occupancy, but said that awarding of contracts is being pushed forward 
with all dispatch. 



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Southern Illinois 
Normal University 

Information Service CABBONDA "' 11 " Mols 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■«»■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ 



Snecial to Southern Illinois Dailies 



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Carbondale, 111., Aug. - Two new instructors have "been appointed to the 
faculty of Southern Illinois Normal University, effective September 16, according 
to University President Chester F. Lay. 

Chalmer A. Gross, who has taught at the Carbon&ale Community High School since 
1930, has "been named instructor in science in the University High School* one of 
Southern's campus laboratory schools conducted "by the College of Education. 

Mr. Gross received his "bachelor's and master's degrees from the University 
of Illinois, and has had additional work at the University and at Southern. He 
taught physics at Southern in the Aviation Cadet Candidate Program during the war. 

Alvar T. Bgrghult has "been appointed instructor in music in the College of 
Vocations and Professions. Mr. Berghult received the "bachelor of arts degree at 
Augustana College and the master of arts degree from the University of Illinois. 

A high school "band director at East Moline, Mr, Berghult 's 150-piece summer 
concert "band was "being featured in the Chicago Music Festival and also at Sterling 
and East Moline. 

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Carbondale, 111., Aug. - Mrs,. Alice Phillips Hector has been appointed to 
the staff of Southern Illinois Normal University for the next school year, University 
President Chester F, Lay has announced. 

Mrs. Hector will serve in the University's student guidance and testing program, 
in the offices of the dean of men and dean of women. 

Holding both the bachelor's and master's degrees from Southern, Mrs. Hector was 
a graduate assistant in the University High School here last year. She has studied 
at the University of Illinois, and has had five years' teaching experience in 
Illinois high schools. 

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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111., ^ug, - A meeting of county school leaders of 
14 Southern Illinois counties to consider possible legislative 
suggestions to aid in the process of county school reorganization 
will be held at Southern Illinois Normal University Sept. 12. 

One of a series of such meetings being held throughout the 
State, this gathering has been called by D. E. Lindstrom, chairman 
of the Illinois Rural Education Committee. 

State representatives and senators from the 14 counties nave 
also been invited. 

County superintendents, county survey committee members, and 
others who expect to attend the session are urged to notify Dr. E. R. 
Fair, dean of the university College of Education, for luncheon 
preservations. The meal will be arranged downtown since the University 
cafeteria is not open between terms. 

Counties to be represented at the conference are Alexander, 
franklin, Gallatin, Hamilton, Hardin, Jackson, Johnson, Massac, 
Perry, Pope, Pulaski, Saline, Union, and Williamson. 



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mm __ _ ___ _ Normal University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■HMHHMHMBBHimnMMH^HUn 









Special to Southern Illinois Dailies & Radio Stations 

Carbondale, 111* » Augf —One of the most symmetrical and least disturbed 

Indian mounds in Southern Illinois, south of the highway a short distance west 

of the point where the highway to Ava leaves Route 13» will "be among the sites 

viewed 
f by the Southern Illinois Historical Society on a historical tour August 3, 

Explanations of the historical significance of the places visited on the 
tour will be given by Jtjhn W. Allen, curator of the Museum at Southern Illinois 
ftormal University , whjtt will direct the trip.. The Rev. H. J. Funke of 
Carbondale is responsible for local arrangements. 

The location of ^he first commercial coal mine, in Illinois, dating back 

to 1882; the Logan Monument on the grounds of Murphy sb oro' s Township High 

i, 
School; and the Loga|& Memorial Library in the Logan home are other destination 

points. 

Old Brditos"v$?$|^, the Kaskaskia Indian reservation, Cora, Rockwood, Mancker 
House, Mary's River*, Chester, Covered Bridge, Kaskaskia, Pierre Menard's home 
and grave, the consent near Prairie du Rocher, Prairie du Rocher itself, Red 
Bud, Hew Design, jfcellefontaine , Waterloo, and Cahokia will be included, also. 

Only earth Embankments and a few stones of the old powder magazine now 
mark the spot w|iere Fort Gage stood, Mr. Allen points out* According to 
tradition, thi^ site was first fortified by the French during their troubles 
with the Chiflffcasaw Indians about 1736. From time to time it was repaired* 
3Por almost 1>wo centuries the hill upon which the fort stood has been known 
as Garrison Hill. 

Chester, founded by Samuel Smith, J. L, Lamb, and Thomas Miacher about 
1820 was nameo. for Chester, England* It early assumed an importance as a 
shipping point for the products of a considerable region. Some of the 
important products shipped from hero were meat, and castor oil. Milling 
became an important industry, and is still. In earlier days, Chester was an 
important river port. 

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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CABBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 






Carbondale, 111., Aug. —Three Conservation Workshops for count" school 
teachers will be conducted by Southern Illinois Normal University during 
August at three centers in Southern Illinois — Chester, Vienna, and Belleville. 

The workshops, sponsored "by the geography department of the University, 
will stress practical conservation of resources such as soil, wild life and 
water, according to ?Br. Thomas I. Barton* professor of geography, vrho is in 
charge of the program. 

Enrollment in the classes will he limited to 30 students each, and 
emphasis will he given to a study of the actual conservation work being done 
in the counties from which the teachers come. 

Morning sessions of the workshops will be devoted to lectures, films 
and discussions, while in the afternoons field trips will be made to inspect 
local conditions of resources. 

Representatives of the University of Illinois College of Agriculture, the 
State Department of Conservation, and the U. S. Soil Conservation Service will 
visit the workshops. 



Carbondale, 111., Aug. — Delmar W. Olson, assistant professor of industrial 
education at Southern Illinois Normal University, has an article on design 
and construction of mounts for scale model aircraft featured in the August 
issue of PoTDular Science Monthly . 

A second article by Mr. Olson, describing a test on dimensioning practices 
in engineering drawing, has been accepted for publication by the Industrial 
Arts and Vnriati rmal Eflueafclcffl magazine. 






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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 









Carbondale, 111., Aug. - M5 ss Eva Mirabel, distinguished Indian artist, has 
been appointed artist-in-residence at Southern Illinois Formal University for the 
next school year, according to President Chester F. Lay. 

Miss Mirabel has already won distinction through her exhibits at the Grafton 
Galleries in Los Angeles, the Sgmta Fe Art Museum, the Tulsa Art Center, the 
Addison Gallery of American Art, the Faulkner Memorial Art Gallery, the Dayton Art 
Institute, and numerous college and University museums, She also has paintings in 
numerous private collections^ 

She comes to Southern from the Women's Army Corps, in which she was a staff 
sergeant. Throughout her career in the army, she developed her work as an artist 
by painting memorial plaques for the chapels at Fort Dix Separation Center, and 
murals at Patterson Field, Ohio. 

Miss Mirabel will teach, arrange exhibits of her work, and paint murals at 
Southern. She is the fourth artist-in-residence brought to the University in 
recent years, the others being Aaron Bohrod, Raymond Breinen 5 painters, and Miss 
May Sarton, poet. 

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Carbondale, 111., Aug, - Appointment of Ledford J. Bishof as counselor and 
tester in the U. S. Veterans Guidance Center at Southern Illinois Normal University 
has been announced by University President Chester F. Lay. 

Bishof is a graduate of Northern Illinois State Teachers College, and has 
taught in the Glidden School at DeKalb, the elementary school at Berwyn, and the 
Morton High School in Cicero. 

He was recently discharged from the U. S, Army, in which he held the rank of 
first lieutenant, and served as psychologist and psychometrist. 

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Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111., aug. - Courses in library science for school 
librarians will again be offered this fall by the College of Education 
at the Southern Illinois Normal University, Dr. Eugene R. Fair, dean of 

the college, has announced. 

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These courses, which give credit toward College of Education 
degrees, are planned in accordance with recommendations of the Illinois 
Library iissociation Sub-Committee on Library Service to Schools, and 
the Office of the High School Visitor, according to Dr. Howard E. 
Bosley, associate professor of education and director of the 
University library. 

They are designed for the purpose of offering training for the 
teacher-librarian, who is defined as "a person who is trained primarily 
as a teacher, and qualifying for part-time service in the school 
library by having compltt^d eight semester hours of library science," 
Mr. Bosley said. 

The school library training curriculum at Southern represents the 
minimum requirement of the Office of the Superintendent of Public 
Instruction and of the Office of the Hi h School Visitor for the person 
in charge of the library in a high school enrolling from 200 to 400 
students, and in an elementary school enrolling from 200 to 500 pupils. 

The beginning course, to be offered starting September 16, stresses 
an acquaintance with book selection aids for high and elementary 
schools, the development of good judgment in selecting and recommending 
books to fit the needs of individual pupils, the guidance and 
development of pupil reading interests, and the ability to select books , 
audio-visual materials, etc., necessary in the integrated use of the 
library in the school. 

Students who are interested in either high or elementary school 
librarianship will be allowed to do special work in the area of their 
choice. Some attention will be ^iven to the reading interests and 
needs of the retarded pupil. 

A full year of library courses will be offered. Courses for the 
winter and spring terms will stress the use of reference books and 

J other informational tools, cataloging and classification of the book 
collection, and the administration of the school library. 
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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Attention: Sports Eaitors 



— Southern Illinois 

- Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 




Carbondale, 111., ^ug. - Football practice' will start at 
Southern Illinois Normal University Sept. 9, Coach Glenn ( 1? Abe ;! ) 
Martin has announced. 

Some 50 candidates for squad positions are expected to report, 
including six lettermen from last year and nearly a dozen returning 
veterans who lettered in former years as well as several outstanding 
freshmen straight from high school. 

Three first-stringers from last season's team will don their 
jerseys again for the first practice — Leedio Cabutti of Johnston City, 
end, Sam Milosevich of Zeigler, tackle, and Gene Davidson of 
Harrisbur^. Cabutti and Milosevich won all-conference positions last 
year. 

Carl Birkner, Pinckneyville, who frequently alternated with 
Davidson at right end, Glen Hamilton of Johnston City, center, and 
Charles Beatty of Benton, end, will also be back. 

Among the veterans of former years expected to report for grid 
duty are Bill Cosgrove of Benton, Nick Milosevich of Zeigler, Bill 
O'Brien of Zeigler, Laurence Calufetti of Johnston City, Jay Pierrone 
of Murphysboro, Jeff Mit.chell of Zeigler, Bill and Dave Malinsky of 
Flora, Don and Roy Ragsdale of Carbondale* 

Both Bill Malinsky and Roy Ragsdale reached the campus in time 
to share in the Maroons' basket ball honors last winter, but will 
resume their football togs this fall for the first time since their 
return from the armed forces. 

The Maroons' first game of the season falls Sept. 2& against 
the Kirksville (Mo.) State Teachers College. 



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ll, Normal University 

Information Service CABBONDALS < ".uuou 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED, 



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Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 

Carbondale, 111., Aug. — If your town doesn't have a kindergarten, and you 
and other parents of pre-school tots are interested in helping your school 
system start one, why not search the attic and "basement for equipment you can 
contribute. , 

A Southern Illinois teacher and a Southern Illinois Bormal University senior, 

"both enrolled in a summer workshop at the University dealing with pro-school 

/ education 

spent the summer developing a list of equipment needed for starting a kindergarten. 

They were Mabel C. Butler of Elkville, second grade teacher in the Elkville 
schools, and Anna Ruth Rhine of Detroit, Mich., a University senior. 

Parents interested in helping establish a kindergarten could donate such 
items as the following, thej^ point out: 

Toy household furniture scaled to children's size, such as stove, cabinet, 
rocking chairs, doll bed, doll cradle, doll buggy, dolls, doll clothes, broom, 
dustpan, telephone, ironing board, iron, tub, wash board, toy dishes, toy pans. 

Scrops of lumber for making shelves, lockers, tables, easels, steps, 
ladders, saw horses, blocks, peg cars, folding screens. 

Outgrown toys such as trains, boats, tricycles, wagons, puzzles, cars and 
trucks, blocks, colored beads for stringing, tinker dolls — even if disjointed, 
"spools, balls of all sizes. 

Children's books and pictures. 

Old magazines. 

Miscellaneous items such as flower ;oots, small pitchers, lar.ee crock for 
using clay, rugs for mats and pieces of rugs for floor, lengths of old oil 
cloth or linoleum, old automobile tires for swings, large and small baskets, 
kegs or barrels, old pieces of rope, shoe laces. 

Wooden boxes or crates — prune boxes, cigar boxes, orr-nge crates. 

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Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CARBOWDALE - ' "■"">» 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■«■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■»■■■■«■ 



(Note to Editor! The names in the following list of graduates are so arranged 
that you may easily select those from your territory. 



Cart>ondale» 111., August — 77 students completed work for graduation from 
Southern Illinois Normal University at the end of the summer term early in August. 

They include: 

AHHA, — Margaret Grant Booth, "bachelor of science in education degree.. 

ATVOOD — Effie Grace Kittle, "bachelor of science in education degree. 

AVA — Maude Smith Gerlach, bachelor of science in education degree. 

BE1TT0B — Martha Jane McAfoos, and Lebern N. Miller, "bachelor of science in 
education degree. 

BLUE ISLAFD — Thmmas Kelson Kias, "bachelor of science degree from the College 
of Liberal Arts and Sciences. 

CAIRO — Mary Kathryn Qrreaneyt "bachelor of science in education degree; 
Margaret Kathryn Henderson, "bachelor of science degree from the College of 
Liberal Arts and Sciences; Patricia. Schultz Kobler, bachelor of arts degree 
from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. 

GaKBOlTDALE— Gary P. Brazier, Pearl Williams Easterly, Scott P. Gill, Betty 
Ann Grater, William Thomas Holder, Mary Elizabeth Miles, George Clay Ragland, 
Vivian Vickers, bachelor of science in education; John William Hawkins, Robert 
E. Stiff, Peggy Wilhelm, bachelor of arts degree from the College of Liberal 
Arts and Sciences; Lois Lay, bachelor of science degree from the College of 
Vocations and Professions; Alice P. Rector, master of science in education degree. 

ICARLIFVILLE — Harry Burke Eoltz, bachelor of science in education degree. 
. CARTERVILLE— Wyatt A. Lindsey, bachelor of science in education degree; 
Max L. Martin, bachelor of arts degree from the College of Liberal Arts and 
Sciences. 






CEFTWILLE— Ethel V. Maxwell Gilbert, bachelor of science in education 
degree. 

CEIITRALIA — James Clarence Greer, Rotha G. Witzel, bachelor of science in 
education degree. 

CHRISTOPHER— Herall Cornelius Largent, Gwyneth L e e Williams, bachelor of 
science in education degree. 

COLP — Gaffney A. Taylor, master of science in education degree. 

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COULTERVILLE — John T. Pullerton, bachelor of science in education degree. 

CYPRESS — Guy J. Hunter, "bachelor of science in education degree. 

DAHLGREN — Everett C. Parkhill, bachelor of science in education degree. 

DIX— Lewis W. Dobbs, bachelor of science in education degree. 

DU QUOIN-— Dwight Teel, bachelor of science in education degree. 

ELDORADO — Paul W. NcKinnis, bachelor of science in education degree. 

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ENFIELD— John 0. Erkman, bachelor of science dogree from the College of 
Liberal Arts and Sciences. 

G-OLCONDA — Cloman D. George, bachelor of science in education degree. 

GRA'.'ITE CITY— -Vivian Elizabeth Lupardus t bachelor of science in education 
degree. 

GREENVILLE — John E. Loftus, bachelor of arts from the College of Liberal 
Arts and Sciences. 

HARRISBURG — Dorothy Jean Dennis, bachelor of science in education degree; 
Gerald E. Webb, bachelor of science degree from the College of Literal Arts and 
Sciences. 

HERRIN — Helen Mar Schwegman, bachelor of science in education degree. 

HURST— Claude J. Rose, bachelor of science in education degree. 

JOHNSTON CITY — Marguerite C. Barra, bachelor of science degree from the 
College of Vocations and Professions. 

KELL— -Virginia Bernice Heflin, bachelor of science in education degree. 

MAKANDA— Virgil N. Wheeles, bachelor of science in education degree. 

MARIOU— Cleo Dorris Carter, bachelor of science in education degree. 

MCLEANS30R0— Ernest L. Hood, bachelor of science in education degree. 

MT. VERNOK — Imogene I vis Clark, bachelor of science in education degree. 

MURPHYS30R0 — Prances Wilma Burkey, Mary Dorothy Jacobs, Elaine Audrey 
Miller, James Pleasant, bachelor of science in education degree; Esther ^ane 
Craver, bachelor of science degree from the College of Vocations and Professions • 

NASHVILLE — Doris Elva Bowers, bachelor of science in education degree. 

NOBLE— Murvin H. Brown, bachelor of science in education degree. 

OAK PARK— Edy the Miller Gahan, bachelor of science degree from the College 
of Vocations and Professions. 

OLMSTEAD — Rudelle Edmonds, Arthur E. Newbern, bachelor of science in 
education degree. 

PERCY— Edward A, Martin, bachelor of science in education degree; Lorraine 









L. Waters, bachelor of arte dogree from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. 

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PI1TCKNEYVTLLE — Gladys Pyatt, master of science in education degree* 

RALEIGH — LVight Karnes, "bachelor of science in education degree. 

R0YALT017— -Evelyn Ann Missavage, bachelor of science in education degree. 

SWANWICK-- Thclma Estollo Quiglcy, bachelor of science in education degree. 

TRENTOU— Bertha Estclla Kuhn, bachelor of science in education degree-. . 

WEST EBA1TCF0RT — Telia A. Bartolotti, Phyllis June Hays, Carl B, Kuehn, 
Pearle M. Tato, bachelor of science in education degree. 

WEST SALEM — Clara Pixley, bachelor of science in education degree; Victor 
Arthur Pixley, bachelor of science degree from the College of Liberal Arts and 
Sciences. 

WOLF LAKE — Cecil G. Trainer, bachelor of science in education degree. 

XENIA-— Berthal L. Middleton, master of science in educrtion degree. 

ZEIGLER — Don Ray Sheffer, bachelor of science in education degree. 

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_ _ ^ _ mmmmm ^_ Southern Illinois 

_________ Normal University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ID. ■HgHBHiHHnBB| HWHMnu 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies & Weeklies 

Carbondale, 111., August — Appointment of Dr. Norman Caldwell 
as assistant professor of history in the College of Liberal Arts 
and Sciences at Southern Illinois Normal University has been 
announced by President Chester F. Lay. 

Dr. Caldwell is a graduate of Southern, and holds both the 
master's and doctor's decrees from the University of Illinois, where 
he served on the faculty for a time. He has also studied abroad, 
and, until his recent discharge, was a captain in the U. S. Army 
during the war. 

Dr. Caldwell comes to Southern from the College of the Ozarks, 
where he has been head of the department of history and political 
science. 

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Carbondale, 111., August — Miss Mary M. Kempe has been 
appointed instructor at Southern Illinois Normal University and 
assigned to the staff of the Wheeler Library, University President 
Chester F, Lay has announced. 

Miss Kempe comes to Southern from the public library at Cape 
Girardeau, Mo. A graduate of Southwest Missouri State Teachers 
College, she holds the bachelor of science degree in library science 
from George Peabody College. She formerly was librarian at Sullins 



College in Virginia. 



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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Special to Southern Illinois Dallies & Weeklies 

Carbondale, 111. August — A total of 337 Southern Illinois Normal University 
students are taking advantage of August courses to continue their education. 
Of this number, 291 are veterans. 

The August offerings, composed entirely of tutorial, seminar and workshop 
courses! were arranged primarily to take care of "hardship cases" among veterans. 
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Carbondale, I'l., August — Dr. E. R. Fair, dean of the College of Education 
at Southern Illinois Normal University, has received notice of his appointment 
to the sub-committee on scholarship of the American Association of Teachers 
Colleges' committee on standards. 

The committee on standards is one of two standing committees of the 
association. 

0-"- of the objectives of the sub-committee to which Dean Pair has been 
appointed is to improve the association's efforts to attract well qualified 
young people to the teaching profession* 

President Chsster E. Lay and Dean Fair attended the annual meeting of the 
association in Chautauqua, 21, Y,» during. June*. 

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Carbondale, 111., August — Appointment of Van A. Buboltz, assistant 
professor of commerce at Southern Illinois Normal University, as supervisor of 
the veterans housing project on West Chautauqua Street, h;»s been announced by 
University President Chester F. Lay. 

Work is now going on at the site of the project to level the ground. T" e 
Federal Public Housing Authority has announced that it would that it would bring 
35 barracks — to be converted into 105 family apartments — here October 5 from a 
Prisoner of War camp in Oklahoma. 

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_ _ m ^ m mmmm B— i ^ u Southern Illinois 

\ ■ . Z Normal University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■■■■■■■■■■■iMHMMII^MHMBBM 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies & Dailies 



Carbondale, 111., August — If j^our youngster is about ready to enter the 
first grade, here are some "Do's and Don't for 3 r ou, compiled by two Southern 
Ill'nois teachers who spent the past summer studj'ing in a pre~school workshop 
at Southern Illinois Normal University. 

The two teacher-studrnts who developed the "Do's and Don' ts" were Anna 
Maxine Daily of DuQuoin, sodond grade teacher in the McKinle^ School, and Kaite 
Salmo of Colp, who teaches first and fourth grade in the Colp Standard School. 

Their suggestions— 

Don' ts : 

1« Do not scare a pupil about his teacher, 

2. Don't continually send -our child to bed at a late hour, and expect him 
to do his best in school the next day. 

3. Don't let the child become too dependent upon others for such things as 
dressing himself, serving himself at mealtimes. 

4. Don't send your child to school too earl^ and expect the teacher to take 
the blame for any accident that might happen. 

5. If you teach a child to write, do not teach him to make all capitals, but 
if possible get a manuscript manual to follow. 

6. Don't expect your child to learn to read too quickly since he must first 
pass through a period of reading readiness. 

7. Don't hesitate to consult the teacher in any doubtful situation. 

8. Don't send ^-our child to school when ho shows signs of general illness, 
such as temperature, skin rashes, running nose, water3 r ™ 

9. Don't fail to send a vritten excuse with j r our child after he has been 
absent or tardy. 

10. Do not send your child to school without first giving him an adequate 

breakfast. 
11. Don't stay with the child the first day of school. It will cause him to 

cling to you. Let him get acquainted with the other children and the 

teacher. 

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Do's : 

1. Remember the teacher is sincerely interested in your child. 

2. Read carefully all notes that are sont home and roturn the answers 
quickly. 

3* Mark with his name each article of clothing that he takes off in school. 

4. Send our child to school clean. Do not ask the other children or the 
teacher to love a dirty child. 

5. Buy rubbers and boots large enough thrt the child can remove them alone. 

6. Teach your child the name and the values of the coins he brings to school, 

7. T-ke -our child to the zoo and other places of interest and encourage 
him to retell his experiences. 

8. Join the Parents Teacher Associations and take part in school activities. 

9. Talk to him and plan with him as you would an adult* 

10. Let -our child help with the dishes, to rake the yard etc. This will 
teach responsibility. 

11. If poscible give - r our child the benefits derived from attending 
kindergarten. 

12. Teach your child to keep all foreign objects out of his mouth and nose. 

13. H'-lp your child to build up a library of small books. Tell him stories 
and lot him retell them. 

14. Help ^-our child to form the habit of being on time and going home 
immediately. 

15. Teach your child to be courteous and icspectful. 

16. Cooperate with the school in seeing that your child has a physical 
examination. 

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^ ^^^ _ _ — _ ^ — Southern Illinois 

___________ Normal University 

Information Service CARBONDALE - Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■________■______■ 



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Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111., August -Two appointments to the faculty of 
Southern Illinois Normal University, Dr. Mary Eileen Barry as assistant 
professor of foreign languages, and Dr. Lewis A. Maverick of Los 
Angeles as associate professor of economics, have just been announced 
by University president, Chester F. Lay. 

Dr. Barry will succeed Miss Helen Baldwin, v. ho recently retired 
from the University after many years of service as a teacher of Latin. 
She has taught in the University of Chicago and the University of Orego 

She received her bachelor's and master's degrees from the 
University of Manitoba, and her doctor's degree from the University of 
Chicago. 

Dr. Maverick received his bachelor's degree from Washington 
University, his doctor of education degree from Harvard University, 
and his doctor of philosophy degree from the University of California. 
He has been an assistant in education at Harvard University, registrar 
and lecturer in education at the University of California, and the 
chairman of the department of economics at the University of Californi& 
in Los Angeles, 

He is the author of numerous articles in the field of education 
and economics, and has written three books: Economics and Social 
Statistics ; Time Series Analysis ; and China : A Model for Europe . 

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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 

Carbondale, 111., August -Twenty three co-eds of Southern 
Illinois Normal University, members of the Alpha Delta Chapter of the 
Delta Sigma 2psilon sorority, are attending the sorority's national 
meeting which is being held at the Benjamin Frsyak^in Hotel in 
^Philadelphia , Pennsylvania, August 20-22. 

The group left Sunday by special car from St. Louis, accompanied 
by another Delta Sig division from Illinois. They Kill return Augdst 2f 

v/ashington, D. C. was the stopping point for the first day, with 

the remainder of the trip to be divided among Philadelphia, New York 

i 
City, and Niagara Falls. Sites of interest in Philadelphia which 

Southern's representatives will see include Independence Kail, the 

Betsy Ross house, Valley Forge, Franklin Institute, Drexel Institute 

of Technology, Temple University, University of Pennsylvania, Congress 

Hall, Girard College, and many other places. 

Two of the twenty three students, Miss Florine Schlueter of 
Carbondale, president of Southern's Delta Sigma ^psilon sorority, and 
Miss Nell Eradley of. Anna, treasurer, are official delegates from the- 
University, and will have their expenses paid by the national - 
organization. 

Money for the trip was raised by the girls during the past school 
year through bridge parties^ ...a hat' sale , : andlcookie-~Sale. 

The co-eds are hoping they have a chance for the prize that will 
be awarded to the girls covering the greatest number of miles, to be 
computed by multiplying the number of miles for a group's trip by 
the number of girls in the group. 






^ Southern Illinois 

___________ Normal University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DHUMMOND, ED. ■■■■■■■■■■■^■■■■MMHMHBHi 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 

Cart) on dale, 111., Aug. - Two more upper-bracket faculty members have been 
appointed at Southern Illinois Normal University, to assume their duties at the 
opening of the fall term, September 16, University President Chester F. Lay has 
announced. 

They are Dr. P. Merville Larson as associate professor of speech and Charles 
M. Behrman as assistant professor of business, both in the College of Vocations and 
Professions. 

Dr. Larson comes to Southern from a position as head of the department of 
speech at the Texas College of Arts and Industries, Kingsville. Educated at Kansas 
State College, Colorado State College, the University of Colorado , the University 
of Denver, and Northwestern University, he obtained the doctor of philosophy degree 
from Northwestern, 

ivmong the colleges at which he has taught are the Hutchinson (Kan. ) State 
Teachers College, the Moorhead (Minn.) State Teachers College, North Park College, 
Eastern Illinois State Teachers College, and Southwest Texas State Teachers College. 

Mr, Behrman is a graduate of Ball (Ind.) State Teachers College and obtained 
the master of arts degree from Northwestern University. Before going into the Army, 
he was employed by the Delco Remy Company for four years. 
j # f # 

Carbondale, Ill.» Aug. - The appointment of Mrs. Margaret Shaw Lynch of 
Gillespie to serve as faculty assistant at Southern Illinois Normal University 
beginning Septombcr 16 has been announced by University President Chester P. Lay. 

Mrs, Lynch, a graduate of Southern, will serve in the physical education 
department of the College of Education. She has taught at the University High 
School, in the Elmwood Park High School, and has served as a stewardess for the 
United Air Lines during the past year, 

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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Attention: Snort Editors 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 









Carbondale, 111., Sept, - All high school students will be admitted to 
Southern Illinois Normal University football games for 40 cents plus tax, providing 
each presents an activity ticket or an identification letter signed by his high 
school principal, Athletic Director and Head Football Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin has 
announced. 

The Maroons' first game will take place on September 28 against Kirksville (Mo.) 
Teachers in MacAndrew Stadium here in Carbondale. This will be 3oy Scout Day and 
many scouts of the surrounding district are expected to attend. 

Southern has an eight-game schedule this season, with five of the contests 
slated as home affairs. After Kirksville, the Maroons will entertain 
Southeastern Missouri State Teachers on October 5» Their next home game will be 
on October 19 against Arkansas State and then on November 2 comes the Homecoming 
game when Eastern State Teachers will come to town to do battle with the Martin-men, 
The final contest to take place in Carbondale this season will see Southern taking 
on northern State Teachers November 16. 

The three out-of-town games will take place on October 12, October 26, and 
November 9, when Southern will play State Normal at Normal, Western State Teachers 
at Macomb, and Evansville College at Evansville, Ind, , respectively. 

The Maroons are expected to have a hard-hitting squad when the men round into 
shape. At the present, Martin is bothered with injuries and "T" formation 
inexperience, but with the many lettermen veterans and the influx of high school 
players, the Carbondale gridders are expected to turn out to be a well balanced 
squad. 

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■^ ^^__ Southern Illinois 

____________ Normal University 

Information Service CARBONDALE - Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■Ka^HHma^HBHBHaBBBBBHMMBHaHni 



SPECIAL to Southern Illinois Dailies: 






Carbondale, 111., Sept. — A plea that Southern Illinois Normal University 
students — 2,570 strong — will accept the hardships of over-crowding in good spirit 
was voiced at the first student assembly of the l9':6-47 session "by Gen. Robert 
W. Davis of Carbondale, member of the State Teachers College Board. 

General Davis sr>oke as a member of the board' s advisor TT committee for 
Southern, which works in close cooperation with the University administration. 

He referred particularly to crowded classrooms, shortage of books at the 
bookstore, food shortages, and difficulties in finding adequate housing. 

"With the largest enrollment in the University's history, the accommodations 
here are taxed far beyond their normal load," he explained. 

"You may ask why the University did not foresee this vast increase in 
enrollment, and prepare for it. 

"As a matter of fact, the University administration — ^resident Lay (Dr. 
Chester i 1 . Lay, president of the University) and other University officials — and 
the board itself did foresee the demands that would be made on Southern as well 
as on other colleges and universities throughout the country. 

''Every effort humanly possible has been made by the University and the board 
to mrke it possible for you to attend Southern* Appropriation of four and two- 
thirds million dollars for post-war expansion here at Scathe *n was secured 
from the last general assembly. The money is available — but it is literally 
impossible to obtain building materials. 

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"We can't get additional "books for you, "because of the critical naper 
shortage. We can't get additional chairs for your classrooms because of the 
critical shortage of lumber and other materials, 

"We have made every conceivable effort to obtain emergency housing. As you 
doubtless know, construction is under, way on 105 apartments out on Chautauqua 
Street, w»3t of the camous, to be used for married veterans. This project was 
obtained by the University through the Federal Public Housing Authority. 

"It will not be ready for occupanc as quickly as we had hoped, for we are 
being held up' on priorities for essential materials such as water pipelines* 
electric lines, etc. 

"But University officials have called on the citizens of Carbondale sad 
nearby towns to help meet the housing shortage* by converting all their spare rooms, 
garages, attics and basements into student accommodations. 

"The University has added some 35 faculty members this fall, to help furnish 
instruction for you, and is still adding more as rapidly as personnel can be 
found. Hew class sections have been added, to &olp "ou get the courses you want, 
as far as possible. Faculty members are teaching longer hours, and the classrooms 
are in use from 8 o' clock in the morning until 6 in the evening, and often at night. 

"So let me assure you that all of us have done everything that could possibly 

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he done to accommodate this big enrollment. 

"Won't you, for -cur part- take the inconveniences and disconforts with a 

minimum of griping? Be good sports about it, and realize that as rare idly as other 

step? can be taken to make the situation better, the Uhivtrs'.ty administration 

and the board will take them. 

"Southern has a wonderful future ahead of it, and you students will in the 
years to come have the opportunity of contributing much to its progress and 
welfare. As loyal, informed students and ex-students, "ou can do far more than 
any other individuals or groups to help us make Southern a great regional University. 

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LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■gni 



Garbondale, 111., Sept. - Expansion of industrial education 

in the College of Vocations and Professions 
/at Southern Illinois Normal University took a step forward this 

week with the appointment of Dr. W. C. Bicknell as professor of 

industrial education and chairman of the department, according to 

President Chester F. Lay. 

Dr. Bicknell comes from the University of Missouri, where he 
has been director of the mechanic arts program. 

During the war years Dr. Bicknell has had extensive industrial 
experience, serving as head of the Testing, Grading, Routing, and 
Research Program in the Naval Diesel School at the University of 
Missouri, and as supervisor at the Pratt & Whitney Aircraft 
Corporation, Kansas City. 

Before going to the University of Missouri he taught at the 
State Teachers College, Kearney, Neb., where he served as acting 
| director of the industrial education department and as dean of men. 

A graduate of North Texas State Teachers College, he obtained 
both the master of arts and the doctor of education degrees from 
the University of Missouri and has also studied at the University 
of California, Los Angeles. 

Dr. Bicknell will assume his new duties here at the opening of 
the fall term, Sept. 16. 

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LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



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Carbondale, 111., Sept. - Unseasonably cool weather 
predominated in this section of Southern Illinois during August, 
though rainfall wasn't as heavy as in itugust a year ago, a Southern 
Illinois Normal University weather observer reports. 

Peak temperature for the month was 95, three degrees cooler 
than the highest recorded in nugust a year ago and an even five 
degrees below July's "hottest day," 100 degrees. 

The thermometer went as low as 47 degrees in nugust, compared 
to a low of 5& in July and of 51 in august, 1945 • 

Rainfall last month totaled 4«62 inches, compared to 3.09 in 
July and 7.20 in August last year. 

The readings werei taken by the U. S. Airways Weather Station 
here on the University campus, maintained by Dr. Thomas F. Barton, 
professor of geography, 

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Information Service c,,so « DAU ' , "" lo,s 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■^■■■■■■■■■HMiMHMHHBnBHaBHa 



Attention Sports Editors 

Carbondale, 111., Sept. - Several outstanding grid stars who 

formerly 
/flashed on Southern Illinois high school football fields \& vr ; -;,'■**'-' 

are expected to report for practice this fall here at Southern 

Illinois Normal University, Coach Glenn ("Abe") Martin., has revealed. 

Southern's practice season will start Monday, Sept. 9, a week 
before the opening of school, with the first ^ame called for Sept. 2#, 
against Kirksville (Mo.) Teachers College. 

Among the new talent Martin looks for will be "Shag" Crouch, 
who played high school football for Community High here in Carbondale 
and later played a year at the University of Kentucky. The 245-pound 
Crouch is enrolling at Southern this fall, and Martin rubs his hands 
with satisfaction as he talks about this prize. 

A 200-pounder from Fairfield, the coach's old home town, is 
another experienced husky whose acquisition pleases Martin. Bob 
Ethridge is his name. He went into the Air Corps from high school :. 
and lettered three years ago with the Iowa Sea Hawks (pre-flight ) . 
Martin doesn't yet know whether he'll put Ethridge in the guard spot 
or at tackle. 

Martin is counting up about 50 candidates who've indicated 
they'll show up for practice next Monday, including several lettermen 
from last year's conference runner-up team, as well as about a dozen 
veterans who lettered in former years. 

Southern's schedule this year is as follows, with game time for 
home games moved up to 2:30, instead of the customary 2 o'clock: 
Sept. 2$, Kirksville, here j Oct, 5, Cape Girardeau, here; Oct. 12, 
Normal, at Normal; Oct. 19, Arkansas State here; Oct. 26, Western, 
at Macomb; Nov. 2, Eastern, here (Southern's Homecoming; Nov. 9| 
Evansville (Ind.) College, at Evansville; Nov. 16, Northern, here. 






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^^^^^^^^^^^^_ Southern Illinois 

___^^_ Normal University 

Information Service oa»bon D *le. .llinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■■■■■■■■■■■MMHHBMHniHMBanHi 



Carbondale, 111., Sept. -To see what Iowa has done with worn-out tonant-run 
farms, three Southern Illinois Normal University faculty members took a 1,000-mile 
swing through the neighboring state during the first few days of September — a 
jaint that may have far-reaching benefits for Southern Illinois agriculture. 

Dr. Henry J. Rehn, dean of the College of Vocations and Professions, Dr. 
R. C. Cassell, professor and chairman of the agriculture department, and Irving 
Peithman, manager of the University Parr.., made the four-day trip. 

They visited nine farms owned by a foundation of the State College of Iowa 
and operated by tenant farmers. 

"It was exciting to see what has been done in the last eight years, since the 
foundation took over the farms, to rehabilitate thorn," Dean Rehn roportod. 

"They were so dilapidated and worn out that the tenants who operated them 
previously had been losing more money year by year. Now all are making money, not 
only for the foundation but also for the tenants." 

The Iowa State College project came as a result of the gift to the college 
of the nine run-down farms plus a $100,000 cash endowment from an investment 
concern which had acquired the farms through foreclosure and failed to make them 
pay. 

Object of the enterprise has been to rehabilitate the farms and make them 
productive enough to support families. 

"The process has been slow," Dean Rehn pointed out, "first because of the 
suspicion with which the tenants and surrounding farmers regarded the 'long-haired 
professors' from the college. 

"They naturally felt that the college would sink great sums of money into 
building up 'show places' which would utilize impractical methods and equipment. 

"But they have found that the college has followed a policy of spending only 
small sums similar to those which practical farmers could afford to spend. The 
idea has boon to carry out improvements that aro within roach of tho farmer noxt 
door. 

"They found out that the foundation director, W. V. Wallace, had no intention 
of didtating to the tenant what he should do, but only of suggesting and working 

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with him. In each improvement undertaken, the tenant himself had to pay half the 
cost» so it was up to him to make the final decision as to what should "be done." 

The first farm the Southern Illinois men visited was a 160-acro combined 
dairy- and hog- farm, once pockmarked with deep gulleys, eroded, the soil virtually 
worthless. Under the Iowa State College management, the gulleys wore filled, 
erosion w s stopped, the land was treated with lime and phosphate. Now excellent 
corn grows on land that was abandoned as farm land 25 years ago. 

The tenant himself "became interested in improving the looks of the farm, and 
has planted shrubs, built sheds, remodeled barns, built a milk cooler. 

This farm was underlaid by "hard pan" as is some of the soil of Southern 
Illinois, the University visitors discovered, and they became much interested in 
the techniques by which the Iowa State College foundation was overcoming this 
handicap, 

"Dr. Cassoll and Mr. Peithman* I know, learned a great deal that they will 
bo able to p a ss on to our agriculture students here at Southern and on to the 
I farmers of Southern Illinois," Dean Rehn declared. 

At the second farm the group visited they found gulleys covered, no vlsiblo 
erosion, a good corn crop, fine permanent pasture— and a well-dressed, well-groomed 
farm wife "as attractive as any city housewife," 

The third farm, near Iowa City, was a dairy farm that formerly had 12 head of 
cattle and now has 30, The tenant sells $700 worth of milk to Iowa City markets 
e^ch month. Except at haying time, the tenant himself is able to do all the work 
on this farm and thus keep expenses down and profits up, 

A local advisory committee of neighboring farmers acts in a consulting 
capacity for each farm, under the Iowa plan, Dean Rehn said. This committee pays 
an official visit to the f arm 'once each year, and is of particular assistance in 
selecting the best tenant to occupy the farm, when a change is necessary. 

"As a matter of fact, some of the tenants get to be such good farmers, and 
become so prosperous, that they want to buy their own farms," Dean Rehn explained. 

"The trip through Iowa was highly profitable for us," he said, "Some of the 
farming methods that are in use on those farms would be quite satisfactory here 
in Southern Illinois. They'll have to be tested out, to see whether they will work 
] as is' on our land here or whether some variation would be better." 

Dr. Cassell, who was formerly on the Southern faculty and who engaged in 



war research work for the U, S. Department of Agriculture during the war years, 
will return to the University this fall to head the department of agriculture. 

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"As wo rebuild our agriculture department, which became depleted during 
the war, we are striving to make very sure that it will he of the greatest possible 
service to the farmers of Southern Illinois," Dean Rehn declared. "This trip 
through Iowa certainly offered some challenging ways in which a college can serve 
the farmers." 



Carbondale, 111., S e pt, - Indications are that some 2,500 students will 
enroll at Southern Illinois Normal diversity here next Monday, Sept, IS, for the 
opening of the 73rd annual fall term. 

Some 1,200 new students have applied for admission, the largest number in 
history. 

More than 1,200 veterans — many of them among the first year students — have 
indicated that they want to enroll, or to re-enter after having been in school 
last spring or in the summer. This number is almost double the veterm group here 
last spring. 

A substantially enlarged faculty will bo on hand to give instruction to what 
is expected to be the University's largest student body. 

Twenty-one new faculty members have been added to the staff, including four . 
full professors, five associate professors, seven assistant professors* four 
instructors* and an artist-in-residence. Some of these started their teaching duties 
in the summer, but twelve of them will make their first appearance at the opening 
of the fall term. 

Tive University departments will have new chairmen this fall — agriculture, Dr. 
Robert C. Cassell; music, Dr. Maurits Kesnar; industrial education, Dr, W,0. Bicknellj 
speech, Dr. P. Merville Larson, all new appointees to the faculty; and botany, Dr. 
Walter B. Welch, associate professor, who replaces Dr. William Bailey, professor, 
who retires this fall. 

Of the new faculty members, 13 are men and women who hold the doctor's degree 
as evidence of their maximum educational preparation for their positions. 

Five new faculty assistants and two full-time administrators— a director of 
extension and placements, a new position, and a chief accountant have also been 
appointed. 

Registration for the fall term will be held Monday, S e pt. 16, for uppcrclassmcn 

and Tuesday, Sept. 17, for freshmen, with classes starting at 8 a. m. Wednesday. 

Freshmen will spend Monday in an orientation program designed to acquaint them 

with University life, with particular attention to the differences between college 
and high school type of study. 



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— — — — — — — Normal University 

Information Service CARBONDALE - Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■■■■■■■■■i^^BBl^ 



Attention: Sports Editors 

Carbondale, Ill. f Sept, 9 - MacAndrew Stadium w&s a beehive of activity 
today as more than 85 candidates turned out for the pre-season practice for 
Southern Illinois Normal University's 1946 football squad. 

In line for scrimmage togs were a few familiar faces from last season, such 
as Gene Stotlar, slingshot tailback who made all-conference, Leedio Cabutti, all- 
conference left end, Sam Milosevich, all- conference tackle, and Carl Birkner, 
stellar end of last season. 

Many of the men's faces were vaguely familiar to present-day students. They 
vere the star performers of earlier years who have just returned from service in 
the armed forces. Chief among these were Lawrence Calufetti, former Maroon team 
captain, Nick Milosevich, Myron Schuster, Jeff Mitchell, Bill O'Brien, and Bill 
Cosgrove. 

The remainder was made up of men who returned too lato to play football last 
season, and incoming freshmen, a number of then with sparkling high school records 
to their credit. 

Today's practice was spent in passing and punting rehearsals, since Head 
Football Coach Glenn ("Abe") Martin wanted to give his charges time to get into 
shape after the summer vacation, before doing any heavy scrimmaging. 

The Maroons' current season will open on September 28 when they play host to 

the Kirksville (Mo.) Teachers. 

The Maroons finished second in the conference race last year, losing out to 
Northern 13 to 6 in the final contest of the season. 



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— _^ ^ _ ^^ _ Southern Illinois 

_________ Normal University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. MHBlHHHHHBHHHnBBgBa 



Carbondale, 111*, Sopt 9 m thd Jb p 'BOefr fro3hmon studonts planning to 
ontor Southern Illinois Moasaal Univoraity this fall will rejorfc for a one* 
day orientation session on Monday, Sept. 16, beforo rogistoring on Tuesday, 
Hiss Holon A, Shuman, doan of women, and Marshall S, Hiskoy, acting dean of 
nan, have announced* 

An assombly for all new students will bo held Monday morning from 9;30 
to 10:30, at which President Chester F, Lay will welcome them to Southern, 
and tho deans of the colleges of Sdueation, Liberal Arts and Sciences, and 
Vocations and Professions will speak briefly on the work available in their 
fields. 

As tho first step in tho University's studont counseling program, each 
now student will fill in vocational preference blanks and personnel blanks, 
and will have a confcrcnco with an assigned faculty counselor who will assist 
him in choosing his course of study and v4 11 servo as his adviser throughout 
the year. 

In the evening, under the sponsorship of the Student Council, the 
freshmen class will meet to organize, 

On Tuesday, freshmen will register, and will take further orientation 
tests, A dance will be hold on Tuesday evening by tho Southern Veterans* 
organization. 

Classes will begin Wednesday morning at 8 o*clocic f In the afternoon 
freshmen women will bo honored at a tea given by the Dean of Women, assi3t» 
ed by co-ed counselors, on the lawn back of Old Main Build ingj 

On Thursday evening a Student Pun Night will be sponsored by the YMCA 
and the YWCA. 

Upperclass students will register on Monday, Sept, 16, while freshmen 
are attending orientation, 

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LORENA DRUMMOND, SD. aSHKawH ^^^^ 




Carbondale, 111., Sept. - A strong program of teacher-oduoatioa, both on 
and off campus, will "be conducted by the College cf Education at Southern Illinois 
Normal Universitjr during the long session which starts Monday, Sept. 16. 

Freshmen students will report for orientation sessions on Monday. Upperclass 
students will register on Monday, and freshmen on Tuesday. 

This fall, the College of Education will start its second year under the 
leadership of Dr. Eugene R. Pair, This marks the first full session of operation 
for Southern as a full-fledged university, with three colleges and a graduate school* 

Southern was started 73 years ago as a teachers college, and the new College 
of Education has taken over the teacher- education functions of what was originally 
a normal school. 

Last spring 850 students wore enrolled in the College of Education, an 
enrollment that climbed to 962 in the summer. In addition, the 101 students 
enrolled in the Graduate School were also majoring in education, since at present 
the only graduate degree offered by the University is in this field. 

Activities of the College of Edudation include college-level instruction 
offered in the department of edudation, practice teaching for student teachers in 
the campus laboratory schools and in affiliated off-campus schools, an extensive 
field service program, and active participation by facultj' - members in 
professional educational organizations — regional, state and national. 

The department of education, with a faculty of 15, offers graduate work in 
educational administration and supervision, elementary education, and subject- 
matter teaching in college and secondary schools, elementary education, secondary 
education, guidance and counseling, and rural education. 

Students in the department take their subject-matter courses in the College 
of liberal Arts and Sciences and in the College of Vocations and Professions, one 
example of the close interrelation of the three colleges and the Graduate School 
in the University's organization. 

This fall, a course in library science for teachers responsible for public 
school libraries will be restored to the curriculum, and a new course in "Public 
Opinion and Propaganda in Edudation" will be taught for the first time. 

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Student teachers are required to do three terns of practice teaching "before 
receiving their d egrees. To provide opportunities for this teaching under 
competent supervision, the College of Education maintains two campus laboratory 
schools— University High School, teaching nearly 200 pupils t and the Allyn Training 
School, embracing grades one to six, a nursery school and a kindergarten. 

Former ly both the 1_ igh school and the elementary school were under the 
direction of a superintendent of campus laboratory schools, but as a means of 
strengthening the practice teaching program, each now has a full-time principal. 

Dr. Ted R. Ragsdale, professor of education, is principal of the Allyn 
Training School, while John D. Mees, formerly a principal of the Harvey, 111., 
high school, was brought in this fall as principal of University High School and 
assistant professor of education. 

A staff of 20 teachers and supervisors of student teaching comprises the 
faculty of University High School and the Allyn Training School has a staff of 13. 

As the University has grown through the years, student teaching facilities 
have become crowded, and additional opportunities for student teaching has been 
sought in the public schools of Southern Illinois, One Carbondale elementary 
school and two rural schools, Buckles and Buncombe, in Jackson County are regularly 
used by student teachers, the University supplying critic teachers to supervise 
their work. Student teaching is also being resumed at Carterville High School 
this year, with two critic teachers, Miss Gladys 0. Smith and Miss Irene Watson, 
ast&gned as supervisors. 

For a number of years home economics students have done practice teaching 
at several off-campus centers, last year working at Dupo, Metropolis and West 
Frankfort, and arrangements are now being worked out, according to Dean Fair, for 
similar off-campus work in this field Jdrikibc this year. 

A number of new faculty will join the College of Education staff this fall, 
some of whom started their duties during the summer. Mr. Mees as principal of 
University High School, for example, began his work during the summer in 
preparation for the long session. 

Other new faculty members include* 

Dr. Eprl I. Hall, assistant professor of education, substituting for Dr. 
Bruce Merwin, professor of education, who is spending 1946-47 on a sabbatical 
leave of absence in study and research at the University of California. 

Chalmer A. Gross, instructor in science in University High School, replacing 
Mrs. Audrey Lindsey, who has resigned to accompany her husband to the University 
of Illinois, where he is a graduate student and where she will teach in high school. 

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Lynn Holder, instructor, and Walter Masurek» faculty assistant, "both in the 
department of physical education for men* Both of these positions are new. 

Mrs. Margaret Shaw Lynch, instructor in physical education for women, replacing 
Mrs. Dorothy Muzzey, who has "been granted a leave of absence for the fall term 
"because of illness. 

Mrs. Louise O'Neil Parker, instructor in physiology and health education, a 
new position. * 

Miss Theodora H. Kloha, instructor in education, who will fill the position 
of Miss Florence Wells, English supervisor in University High School, who retires 
this fall* 

Edward L, Allen, faculty assistant and critic teacher at Buncombe School, 
who replaces Jean Eligor, on leave this year to work toward his doctoral degree 
at Michigan State College. 

Mrs. 3ernice Sickman, faculty assistant and assistant critic teacher at 
3 um combe School, who replaces Mrs. Anne Placko Hedges, who has in turn replaced 
Mrs. Lucy Fligor as assistant at the Nursery School and Kindergarten. Mrs. Fligor 
has accompanied her husband to Michigan. 

In addition to its instructional program, the College of Education carries on 
a broad program of field service to teachers. A committee of University educators, 
he a ded by Dr. Howard E. Bosley, serves as monsultants for Southern Illinois county 
school reorganization committees. 

More than a dozen conferences of Southern Illinois school people — teachers, 

during the past year 
principals, superintendents, county committees — have been held/ by the University 









as have several meetings called "by the State Department of Education. 

An aviation education conference; workshops in health education, rural 
education, and nursery school-primary education; a week-long administrator's 
workshop; four child guidance clinics; a Parent- Teacher conference; and a, book 



exhibit have been held. 

Workshops in rural education and conservation were held during August in 
Southern Illinois communities away from the campus. 

To be of particular service to teachers, a large number of extension courses 
are offered in Southern Illinois communities, and one night class and two 
Saturday classes are to he given on the campus this year by the College of 
Education. 

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TWIT 

Note to Newspaper Editors: A one-column mat of Dr. Eugene R. Fair, dean of the 
College of Education is enclosed to be used with this story or placed in your files. 



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_______ Normal University 

Information Service CABBONDALE - ILLINO,s 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. MBaBHHHMHHHHHHBHHHBBaHHMMfli 



Special to Sports Editors 

Carbondale , 111., S e pt.ll " ^-s the Southern Illinois Normal University 
gridders swing into their third day of pre-season practice, they are preparing 
to get down to some serious work. Over 100 men have turned out to date and many 
of them are reporting for practice in track suits as there are not enough 
football togs .to go around. 

So far, all practice has "been confined to calesthenics, passing, and punting, 
"but today Coach Glenn "Aoe M Martin had the linesmen blocking hard. later the moi 
will be put into teams for regular practice. 

Looking especially good on the line work were Sam Hilosevich, Zcigler^ all- 
conference tackle last year, Bill Cosgrove of Benton* and Mytron Schuster of 
Murphy sb or o. These three men were tutoring the younger men in the arts of 
offensive and defensive line play. 

Working out of a "T 11 formation and looking fully as capable as he did last 
season when he made all-conference was tailback Gene Stotlar, Pinckneyville. 
Alternating with Stotlar was Bill Malinsky, Flora, who is shaping up after a hitch 
in the armed fofces. 

The end positions are pretty much of a toss-up as there are 20 candidates 
out for the coveted positions. 

In the kicking department Malinsky and Jack Stevens, West Frankfort, were 
leading the way, getting off some nice punts. 

The Maroons will be without the services of Hick Milosevich, Zeigler, who 
with his two brothers Sam and Pete, was expected to put on a brother act for 
Southern. It was learned, however, that Nick is attending Western Michigan. Sam 
and ?ete£ are on hand and going strong. 



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LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 






Carbondale, 111. Sept. — Saturday, Se -t ember 14, will mark a turning point in the 
life of Coach Glenn "Abe" K artin' s grid trainees at Southern Illinois Normal 
University. Heretofore all action has been & imitated-—' an< ^ Pl a 3 rs have been run 
through on paper, but on Saturday at 2:00 p.m., the men will line up for their 
first heavy scrimmage. 

The ^aroons have not been too impressive in their drills so far, except for the 
eiith&&few§m that they have shown, but that will all be history when the men face 
each other across the line. 

Injuries should, not hamper Martin's practice too much because he is able to go 
about six deep at almost any position. 

'Eowfiweat? WSSMP^? all of his men are question marks as yet. He has some star 
high school players such as William Wilson and Don Riggs of Fairfield; Harlan 
Wiley and John Landis of Piano; Joe Trapani, John Ruzich, Jack Orlea, and 1111 
Hansford of Johnston City; Keith Stonecipher and Tom Cross pf Salem; Jim Stoffel 
of East St, Louis; Don Smith of Flora; Russell Sexton, Wendall Jones* and Charles 
Heinz of G-illespie; Bret and Gordon McGinnis of Carbondale; Galan Davis and J. 
Gross of Du Quoin; Joe Franza of Murphysboro; Carol Fletcher and Ralph Cashen of 
Benbon; Charles Fitts and Don Creath of Dupo; M, D, Farmer and George Beltz of 
Marion; John Catlin of Harrisburg; Bill Bleyer of Cartervi.lle*-to mention a few, 
but he cannot tell yet which ones can make the college football level. 

On the other hand, he hag such lettermen back as Sam. Milosevich and Jeff 
Mitchell of Zeigler; Carl Birkner and Gene Stotlar of Pinckneyville; Charles 
"Shag"' Crouch of Carbondale; Bill Malinsky of Flora; Myron Schuster and Jay 

Pieronne of Murphysboro; Leedio Cabutti of Johnston City; Bill Cosgrove of Benton; 

DeSoto whether 

aad Roy Ra^adale • of/ " ! "but he does not know/* they will play their former brand 

of football or not* 

Beginning with sciimmage on Saturday, during which assistant coach L. C. Holder 

will be standing by with liniment and bandages, Martin should see his pig skin 

representatives shape up into what he hopes will be a well balanced squad. 



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[ Normal University 

Information Service CA8BONDALE - , " ,, ° 11 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED, IMHaBHM^HMBHHBHHHMHHHHiiH 






Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 

Carbondale, 111., Sept, - The gradually increasing tempo of 
the Southern Illinois Normal University grid program is becoming 
apparent on the training field. 

Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin divided his squad into three teams with 
Bill Malinsky of Flora quarterbacking one; Gene Stotlar of Pinckneyville 
masterminding another; and George Baysinger of Carbondale handling the 
third* 

In all probability, one of these three men will be the chief 
tailback when the season opens next September against Kirksville 
Teachers, Mo., and each man is performing exceptionally well, 

Malinsky is the biggest of the three and is developing into a 
very deceptive ball handler; Stotlar is leading the field in deception 
and speed, which he showed to such good advantage last year when he 
made all-conference; Baysinger is coming along fast, and although his 
performances are spotty, at times he looks like the best ball handler 
of the three. 

The line working with Malinsky sounds like an all-star Southern 

squad of past seasons. Such men as Charles "Shag" Crouch, massive 

center of Carbondale, Bill Cosgrove of Benton, Jeff Mitchell of Zeigler, 

Myron Schuster of Murphysboro, Carl- Birkner of Pinckneyville, Roy 

Ragsdale of DeSoto, and Jay Pierrons of Murphysboro, 

It was announced that the squad would begin heavy scrimmage Saturday. 

i if t 






i, 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 

Carbondale, 111., Sept. - Deluged with students, Southern 
Illinois Normal University has: 

(1) set aside a third day for registration and postponed initial 
meeting of classes until Thursday morning. 

(2) started employing more faculty members about a half dozen 

new ones were secured today. 

(3) opened two score new class sections, many of them to meet 
durin the noon hour, between 3 and 6 p. m. , at night, and on Saturdays. 

a total of 1,155 upperclass students registered Monday, and 637 
freshmen enrolled today, making a total of 1792. Current estimates 
place final enrollment for the fall term at 26OO- 2,600, compared to 
lj06^ for the fall term last year and 1,531 for the spring term. 

About half tho freshmen on campue completed registration today and 
it is believed a large number of upperclassmen are still to register. 

The vast increase in registration here is largely attributed to 
the fact that as yet Southern is one of few colleges and universities 
in the State which have not limited enrollment by one means or another. 
Some institutions have fixed a maximum number for freshmen, others 
have raised admission standards to take only s tudents with a higher- 
than-usual scholastic average, others have limited out-of-state students 

(more) 



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Information Service 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED, 



So far, Southern has not placed any barriers before prospective 
students, but has warned them of the housing shortage, and urged that 
they find living accommodations before enrolling. Apparently this has 
not proven too great a handicap, for actual registration has exceeded 
pre-registration applications by several hundred. 

Southern's housing counselor has canvassed the entire city and 
nearby towns for student housing, and has persuaded scores of citizens 
to remodel garages, attics, and basements for apartments and rooms. 
Every faculty member has been solicited to rent spare bedrooms to 
students. 

Housing for new faculty has proven as serious a problem as 
student housing, but accommodations have been secured for all of the 
31 new teachers and staff members who joined the University family 
this fall, although services of several prospective faculty members 
were lost because they became discouraged over the housing situation. 

The University's committee on admissions, scheduling and 
registration has been frequently in session this week to consider 
how best to handle the unprecedented influx of students. 



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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED, 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Special to dailies 






Carbondale* 111. Sept* -Practice was slowing down to a walk today on the 
Southern Illinois Normal University football field according to head football 
coach Glenn "Abe" Martin. Injuries plus freshman registration were responsible 
for the letdown* 

Many of the veterans were sidelined or forced to confine their practice to 
calesthenics because of foot injuries, and most of the freshmen were taking 
tests i leaving only a skeleton squad to take the field today to practice passing* 
punting, and line plays* 

The scheduled scrimmage last Saturday was called off because the men were not 
in good enough shape, Martin said. The mentor is bringing his men along slow in 
a training program designed to bring the team up to pin-point perfection for the 
opening game with Kirksville (Mo*) Teachers on Sept. 28, 

One of the many headaches suffered by M a rtin this season is the bad timing 
shown by his squad. Very few men out this year have had any "T" formation work in 
college football, and during the practice sessions this is showing up greatly. 

The practice sessions should swing back into high gear* however, on Thursday 

when all the candidates have the registration bugs cleared from their minde 

and their injuries patched up. 

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^ mmm mm ^ _ immmmmmmmm mmmmmm Southern Illinois 

________ Normal University 

Information Service carbondalk, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■HnHEn^^^Hna^nOM^HHi 



Oar"bondalei 111., Sept. — Five new additions to the faculty at Southern 
Illinois ITornal University have just "been made, according to a report from President 
Chester F. Lav. 

For the first time Southern has a full-time journalism instructor, Robert A. 
Steffes. In previous years journalism courses have been taught part-time by members 
of the history and English departments. 

Mr. Steffes received his bachelor of science degree at South Dakota State 
College and has done graduate work in journalism at Syracuse Univer^itj'', vhere he 
served as graduate assistant. He has taught in South Dakota High Schools, owned and 
operated the Turton Trunroet at Turton, South Dakota, did editorial work for the 
Brookings Register and the Redfield Jour naJ. .Observer , both South Dakota weekly 
newspapers. 

This fall Mr. Steffes will teach two journalism courses, adding others as 
students become ready for more advanced work. 

Harold C. Eines has been appointed instructor in music, and will be responsible 
for work in band. He received his bachelor's and master's degrees from the 
University of Illinois and taught at Atwood, Illinois, high school. He held the 
rank of '-'.'arrant Officer in the Army Air Corps and was bandleader of the Army Air 
Forces at Minter Field, California. 

Clarence L. Tinge will serve as associate professor of geography. His 
bachelor's degree ir ?s ta v en at Northern Michigan College of Education, his master's 
and' doctor's degrees at the University of Wisconsin, where he taught as an 
assistant. For ten months he served as business economist for the War Production 
Doard in Washington, D. C. and in the U. S. Army he was photographic officer and 
combat pilibt. H e was awarded the distinguished flying cross and the purple heart. 

Edward L. .^llen has be" j n appointed rural critic and Mrs. Bernice Lafocn 
Sickman, assistant rural critic, to serve at Buncombe School, off-campus 
laboratory center for student teachers. 

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B ^_ ^ — _ _ _ Southern Illinois 

_^_ ____ N °"»«i University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. BBHtBMMMH^^^^^i^H^ 



Carbondale, 111., Sept. -In operation less than a year, the new College of 
Vocations and Professions at Southern Illinois Normal University, which opens its 
73rd annual long session Monday, Sept. 16, is getting into full swing. 

Pour departments in the college will h a ve new permanent chairmen this fall, 
according to Dr. Henry J. Helm, who was "brought from Temple University, 
Philadelphia, last October to serve as dean of the new college. 

Ea<;h of these four departmental chairmen is a recognized authority in his 
field, holding the doctor' s degree as an academic rating and having an extensive 
"backlog of professional experience. 

Pour other new faculty members have also been added to the teaching staff of 
the college this fall — a journalism instructor, a band instructor and director, 
an associate professor of economics, and an artist-in-residence. 

The faculty of the college now numbers 27, and this fall will offer a total 
of 78 courses in nine fields— agriculture, art, economics, business, industrial 
education, journalism, music, speech, and home economics. 

Journalism is being restored to the curriculum of the University after a 
lapse of a j r ear, with two courses to be given this fall by Robert A. Steffes, 
former North Dakota newspaperman who has been doing graduate study at the 
University of Sj^racuse School of Jcurnalismthis fall. A full degree program in 
this field is to be opened as rapidly as students become ready for more advanced 
courses, Dean Rehn said. 

Speech is also being expanded with the creation of a speech department and 
the appointment of Dr. P. Merville Larson as associate professor and department 
chairman, Dr, Larson for a number of years has been head of the speech department 
at Texas College of Arts and Industries. 

The agriculture, industrial education and music departments Rtitxajdatsdaaacs 
JSSSXjSjsBSKtjagKis will also have new departmental chairmen. Dr. R. C. Cassell, 
professor of agriculture, was formerly on the Southern faculty but has spent most 
of the last three years in war research for the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 
He now returns to head Southern's expanding agriculture department. 

Dr. Mauritz Xesnar, professor of music and new music department chairman, 
is a professional violinist and has been a member of several outstanding European 

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orchestras as well as the Minneapolis Synphony and the New York Stadium orchestras* - 
Ke cones to Southern from August ana College, where he was director of the school 
of music. 

Another addition to the music department faculty this fall will he Harold 
Kines, who holds the master's degree from the University of Illinois, as instructor 
in hand and director of the Southern hand. 

Dr. W. C. Bicknell, who has been director of the mechanic arts program at 
the University of Missouri, now becomes professor of industrial education and 
chairman of the industrial education department at Southern. He directed a Navy 
Diesel School research program at the University of Missouri during the w a r, and 
later was a supervisor in a Kansas City aircraft plant. 

The other two new faculty members joining the staff this fall are Dr. Lev/is 
A. Maverick, associate professor of economics, who comes to Southern from the 
University of California, where he was chairman of the economics department, and 
Miss Eva Mirahal, distinguished Indian painter, as artist-in-residence. 

Miss Mirahal, in addition to teaching classes in painting, will maintain a 
studio here and will permit students to come in for observation and counseling 
while she is at work. 

Two other new faculty members — Conrad White as assistant professor of 
agriculture and Ben Watkins as assistant professor of art — assumed their duties 
here during the summer. 

Seven new courses will be offered by the College of Vocations and Professions 
this fall— a freshman agriculture course in Poultry Production; a junior business 
course in Transcription and a junior course in Financial Management; an 
Introduction to Home Economics, for freshmen; a freshman industrial education 
course in Descriptive Geometry; a music course in Keyboard Harmony; and a 
Journalism Laboratory course. 

A wide range of subjects is offered '^y the various departments in the 
college, including: 

Agriculture — animal husbandry, soils, horticulture. 

Art — sculpture, painting, ceramics, weaving, art appreciation. 

3usiness — general business, accounting, secretarial science. 

Economics — general and applied. 

Home Economics — clothing, nutrition and dietetics, homempking. 

Industrial Education — draftsmanship, machine shop, woodwork. 
■ Music — voice, string, piano, band and orchestra, theory, composition, 
music appreciation. 

Speech — public speaking, acting. 

Journalism — reporting, editing. 

(more) 



Besides its on- campus instructional program, the College of Vocations and 
Professions will offer two extension courses — Music and Entertainment, taught 
by D. S. Mcintosh, associate professor of music, at Pinckneyville, and Art 
Education in the Public School, by Miss Lulu D. Roach, assistant professor of art, 
at Benton. 

The home economics department conducts a substantial part of its student- 
teaching program at high schools of Southern Illinois. Like other departments 
in the College of Vocations and Professions and the College of Liberal Arts and 
Sciences, it teaches subject-matter courses for students in the College of 
Education, and requires three terms of practice teaching for prospective teachers 
who are majoring in home economics* 

Another phase of practical experience required of home economics students is 
residence for six weeks in the Practice House, a demonstration home maintained 
by the department. Here the students put into actual practice in a home 
environment the things they have learned in class and laboratory — buying, planning 
meals, cooking, serving, keeping house, "budgeting, etc. 

Agriculture students likewise receive practical experience on the 72-acre 
University Parm, adjacent to the campus, where experimental work goes on in soil 
conservation, crop gro\iring and animal husbandry. Dean Rehn, Dr. Cassell, and 
Irving Peithman, manager of the University Parm, recently made a four-day tour 
of experimental farms in Iowa to see what new techniques might be adapted to 
the needs of students here and farmers of Southern Illinois. 

A Cannery is maintained by the College across the street from the University 
campus. Operated by the University with the aid of the U. S. Department of 
Agriculture as a war food conservation project, it is now run entirely ^y the 
University. 

Staffed "by two instructors, the Cannery has processed 2,700 to 2,300 cans 
of fruits and vegetables per week this summer, providing this service to housewives 
of this area at a nominal cost. Technically supervised "oj the home economics 
department, it is under the business supervision of Van Buboltz, assistant 
professor of business. 

The College of Vocations and Professions, along with other branches of 

the University, is cooperating with the University of Illinois and other agencies 

such as the State Porest Service, the State Geological Survey, and the State 

Historical Association, in a survey of Southern Illinois resources and ; 

potentialities. Dr. Rehn, dean of the college, is a member of the central 

planning committee for the survey. 

One of three under- graduate colleges in Southern's recently expanded 
organization as a university, the College of Vocations and Professions is designed 
to afford both four year degree plans and shorter programs of technical, vocational 
and professional training for the youth and adults of Southern Illinois. 

m 






Southern Illinois 
Normal University 






Information Service CARBONDALE ' 1LLINOIS 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■^^■^^■■^■^^■■■i^^Bl^BBI^BBIII^^BIMB^ n, 



Special to Dailies 

Carbondale, *1I»» Sept. -Enrollment at Southern Illinois Kormal University 
reached an alltime high of 2570 students during the third day of registration 
here. 

Classes which had "been scheduled for Wednesday were postponed until Thursday 
to continue freshmen registration, which now stands at 1415. Upperclassmen total 
1155. However, additional upperclassmen are expected to register late* 

Southern' s previous all-high record was in the year 1939-40, with approximately 
2100 students* Average enrollment for a number of years "before the war was 
around 1800, 

Veteran enrollment has practically doubled, as the figure at present is 
approximately 3200, compared to about 675 during the summer term. The exact count 
on veterans will not "be available until Monday, the Registrar's Office reported* 



■>i 




Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ZD. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



9-23-46 






Special to Southern Illinois Dailies: 

Carbondale, 111., Sept. — Alfred Simpson, former Southern Illinois principal 
and superintendent, has "been appointed instructor in University High School at 
Southern Illinois Normal University, President Chester F. Lay has announced. 

Mr. Simpson will handle the work in English formerly taught by Miss Florence 
A. Wells, who retired from the faculty this fall. 

A graduate of Southern, M:*. Simpson holds the master of arts degree from 
the University of Illinois and has also studied at Illinois State Normal 
University, Butler University, and Indiana University. 

For 14 years he has taught in the public schools of Illinois, and has 
served as principal and superintendent at Burnt Prairie and Springerton. 

He is now on terminal leave from the U. S, Navy, in which he served with 
the rank of lieutenant commander. 

# # # 






Carbondale, 111., Sept. 23 — 3ecause of the vastly increased enrollment of 
students, the cafeteria at Southern Illinois Normal University has rearranged 
its schedule, and has been forced to discontinue serving the gnneral public, 
President Chester F. Lay and Mrs, Lydia Windate, cafeteria director, have 
announced. 

Hereafter the cafeteria will be open Monday through Saturday noon, and will 
remain closed on Sunday. Service will be limited to students, faculty and 
educational groups. 

The large enrollment — which now stands at 2,650, has made it necessary to 
schedule more classes on Saturday than ever before, so that the cafeteria will 
serve the noon meal to accommodate those who remain on campus for classes on 
Saturday. 

"It is with regret that it has become necessary to discontinue serving 
non-University patrons," President Lay said, "but our first obligation is to our 
students." 



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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 



Normal 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



9-24-46 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies: 

Carbondale, Illinois, Sept,, — Following his plan to "bring the 1946 football 
trainees along slowly, Glenn "Abe" Martin, Southern Illinois Normal University- 
mentor is still holding light scrimmages in getting his charges ready for their 
first game of the season next Saturday* 

The Maroons open here at 2*30 Saturday against Northeast Missouri State 
Teachers College from Kirksville. 

ITo position was "cinched on the 1946 Maroons as all candidates are being 
given a fair chance to show "Abe" what they can do« 

As the training sessions roll along, the backfield men are developing a bit 
more finesse in their timing and the line-men are hitting the tackling dummy 
harder. However, man TT of the rough edges still have to be rubbed off yet in the 
remaining days before the season' s opener. 

Whether good or bad, the team will certainly be in condition as the coaching 
staff places great emphasis on physical training. 

A few of the candidates have dropped from the squad due to injuries but there 
are still over six teams left from xuhich to choose an opening, eleven. 

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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Spatial to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 







Carbondale, 111. Sept., - Fifty men will take the field for Southern 
Illinois Normal University come next Saturday when the Maroons vi 11 
meet the Kirksvillo (Mo # ) Teachers in MacAndrcw Stadium at 2:30 P.M., .. 
Athletic Director and Eoad Football Coach Glenn '"'Abe" Martin announced. 
There will be nine ends, nine tackles, ten guards, four centers, four 
fullbacks. 12 halfbacks, and two quarterbacks. 

Thoy arc: Fnds-Loedio Cabutti of Johnston City, John Catlin of 
Harris burg, Bob Colburn of Flora, Ga Ian Davis of' Du Quoin, Joe Frenzc 
of Murphysboro, Ike Einklc of Jackson Cit}', Mich., Tim Sexton of Gillespie, _ 
Gone Davidson of Earrisburg, Quentin Stinson of Fldcrado; 

Tackles-Jim Lovin of Benton, Lcroy Cashen cf Eenton, Bill Cox of Marion, 
Chas, Mathiow of Bl#8#cdo, Chester Mitchell of Mnlkcytovjn,Sam Miloscvich of 
Zoiglor, Bill Thompson of Mt. Vernon, Hermcm Mines of Sparta, John Eowdon of 
Wood Bivcr; 

Guards-Bill Cosgrove of Benton, Bob Ifchcridgc of Fairfield, J.L. Gross 
of DuQuoin*;. Clyde Lcilich of New Athens, Orm Osbom of Jackson City, Michigan 
J.Pioron of Murphysboro, W.M.Kozyak of Granite City, Myron Schuster of 
Murphysborc, Mike Sortal of Zoiglor, Joe Trapani of Johnston Cityj 

Centers-Tom Cross of Salem, Chas. "Shag" Crouch of Carbondale, Cliarlic 
Heinz of Gillespie, Wendell Jones of Gillespie; 

Fullbacks-Lawrence Calufotti of Johnston City, John Buzich of Johnston 
City, George Sawyer of Wood Bivcr, Jack Stop hen of W. Franlcfort; 

Halfbacks-Goorge Beltz of Marion, Don Creath of Fast St. Louis, Morris 
Farmer of Marion, Bob Johnson of Boy alto a, Bill Malitisky of Flora, Bill 
0*3ricn of Zoiglor, Dick Scelman of Flora, Jr. Walker of Zoiglor, Don Biggs 
of Fairfiold,W.D,Wiiicinsoii of W. Franlcfort, Jack Biddle of Dupo, Boy 
Bagsdele of DoSoto; 

Quartorbacks-G.orgc Baysingor of Carbondale, Gone Stotler of Pinckney- 
ville. 

The major change on the squed has been the conversion cf Malinsky from 
quartcrbeck to halfback. This leaves only fewo "T" formation ball handlers, 
Baysingor and Stotlar, 

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£_ mmmm — wmmmm ^^ m mmmmmmm Southern Illinois 

________ Normal University 

Information Service CABBONDALE < iw»©m 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■■^■■■■■■■■iHaBnMHBMa 



Special to. Southern Illinois Dailies 



C.arbondale, 111*, Seg>t« 27, -With the weather man promising to 
hold off with rain,, and a capacity crowd- expected, the Southern 
Illiinois Normal, University 1.946 grid hopefuls will, make a. gala debut 
tomorrow.' afternoon, ait 24 30 pa* in MacAndreW/ Stadium in Carbondale. 

Their opponents will be the Northeastern Missouri State Teachers 
f.rorm Kirksville, who. already haave one victory under their belt in 
the comparatively young season,, that being an 18-0 whiter ash over 
low/a. Wesley an. 

The Maroons will not look too familiar to the fans of last year 
except in the "T" formation backfield where ail-conference Gene: 
Stotlar a£ Pinckneyville wilJi he directing traffic: again this year, 
and on the left side of the line where Leedio Cabutti of Johnston 
City,, all-conference end and voted most valuable player on the 
Maroons,, and Sam Milosevlch of Zeigler, all-conference tackle. 

The rest of the starting lineug will find such M old timers" as 
Myron Schuster of Murphy sb or Q at left guard,, Charles "Shag" Crouch 
of Garb and ale at center,, Bill Cosgrove of Benton at right guard", 
Jeff Mitohell of Mulkeytown at right tackle., and John Cat Lin of 
Harrisburg at right end in the line. 

The other hackfield performers wili include veterans Bill 
Malinsky of Flora, at right half, and Lawrence Caluf etti of Johnston 
City at fullboack,, with freshman Dick Seelman of Flora, at left half. 

Kirksville is reported to be Without the services of their first 
s.tring fullback,, Oil in Drennan,, and their first line end, William 
Clark, both of whom received knee injuries in their, firs:t tilt. 

The Maroons will he out to stop the Missourian's 195 pound full- 
back, Stan Sadich, ©rid halfbacks Joe Asperger,, 160 pounds, and Bob 
Evans, 18.0 pounds. 

As a pre-game attraction, boy so outs of the surrounding area will 
parade, before the grandstand between 2 and. 2:30 garni 

Tickets for the contest will- go on sale st 1:30 pmi. at the 
ticket office in front of MacAndrew Stadium". 

JUUL 






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Information Service 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



LOBENA DRUMMOND, ED 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbon&ale, 111., Sept. - Southern Illinois ITormal University's football 
squad will open the current season Saturday when the Maroons entertain the 
Kirksville (Mo.) Teachers in McAndrew Stadium. Game time is 2:30 p.m. 

Saturday will also he 3oy Scout Day at Southern. All scouts and their 
favorite leaders who plan to attend the game will meet on the lower athletic field 
at 2 p.m. i and they will parade in front of the grandstand in McAndrew Stadium 
between 2 and 2:30 p.m. 

. A capacity crowd is expected when the Maroons take on their foes from across 
the Mississippi, This will be the first game for Southern* Kirksville having 
defeated Iowa Uesleyan 20-0 last Saturday* 

Athletic Director and lead Football Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin has released 
his tentative starting lineup as follows: LlWLeedio Cabutti of Johnston City; 
LT-Sam Milosevich of Zeigler; LG-*Myron Schuster of Murphy sboro; C-Charles "Shag" 
Crouch of Carbondale; HG-Bill Cosgrove of Benton; RT-Chester Mitchell of 
Mulkeytown; RE-John Catlin of Harrisburg; QB-Gene Stotlar of Pinckneyville; LK- 
Dick Seelman of Flora; RH-±3ill Malinsky of Flora; FB-Lavrence Calufetti of 
Johnston City. 

The officials for the contest are: Referee-Ted Search (McKendree) of Chester; 
Umpire-Paul McKennis (George Washington University) of Eldorado; Head Linesman- 
Chlorus Hubble (McKendree) of Flora* 









The Missourians plan to remain in Mt. Vernon on Friday and arrive in Carbondale 



on Saturday morning* 

High school students will be admitted to this game, as well as all other 
Southern home games, for the admission price of 40 cents plus tax (a total of 60 
cents) plus a high school activity ticket or a letter of identification signed by 
their high school principal. Adult admission will be $1.20, children under 12 will 
be admitted free, and children over 12 will be charged 60 cents. 

All tickets will go on sale in the box office in front of McAndrew Stadium on 
Saturday at 1:30 p.m», the business Office has announced* 

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Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■BBBHHM 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111., Sept. -After being bottled up for three 
periods, the Southern Illinois Normal University gridders finally 
pushed across a lone touchdown for the only score of the game as the 
Maroons took the measure of the visiting , Kirksville (Mo.) Teachers 
6-0 last Saturday in MacAndrew Stadium. 

With both teams showing very little power, the game settled into 
what would have been a very drab affair except for several break-away • 
runs by Kirksville 's Joe Aspberger, and some fancy spot passing by 
Southern's Gene Stotlar of Pinckneyville. 

Beth lines seemed formidable, but both teams were afflicted with 
the same trouble; that is, neither backfield was fast enough to do 
the "T" formation justice. 

Southern's score came late in the fourth period after Bill 
Malinsky of Flora connected a long pass to Bob Golborn, also of 
Flora, on the Missourian's 10 yard line. The Llaroons drove to the 
five yard line but lost the ball on downs. 

Kirksville punted to their own 45 yara line and from there Southern 
started their toucndown march. With Stotlar mixing short passes 
with end runs, the 1.1a r©nns drove down to their foes two ytird line. 
Then Stotlar drove over for paydirt. The attempt for conversion was 
no good and the contest ended a few minutes later with the 
Illinoisians once more driving from midfield. 

The Maroons lost two scoring opportunities when officials ruled 
that end Leedio CabutT;i of Johnston City stepped out of bounds shen 
he caught a pass on the Kirksville one foot line, and again when 
Southern drove dowm to the Missouri five yard line but had the play 
called back because of unnecessary roughness. 

Outstanding linemen for Southern were center Charles "Shag" Crouch 

of Carbondale, end Sam Milosevich of Zeigler, guard Myron Schuster of 
Zeigler, end John Catlin of Harrisburg, and guard Bill Cosgrove of 
Benton. 

In the backfield, quarterback George Baysinger of Carbondale, 
fullbaGk Lawrence Calufeti:i of Johnston City and freshman halfback 
Dick Seelman of Flora were the mainstays. 



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Information Service 

LOBENA DRUMMOND, ED, 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



9-50-4G 



Release Tuesday, October 1 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, Ill.j Oct* — Southern Illinois Normal University 
is today serving as host to the So r them Illinois School Pasters 1 
Club for its fall meeting. 

The meeting was held in sections for city superintendents, of 
which II. Em Pinkstsff of Anna was chairman; high school principals, 
Paul V. Feppley, Purst, cb.airrii.an; and elementary orincipals, Kenneth 
Tcrath, Centralia, chairman, 

Chief speakers for the high school principals' meeting were Dr. 
Feal Pbelps of Southern, Paymond Dey, director of the Placements 
Office at Southern, and Albert Nicholas, Anna. 

Speakers for the elementary principals were Eugene V. TT orris, 
parrisburg; Willis Smith, Ft. Vernon; Oren Gillespie, Centralia; and 
rold Hathaway, At. Vernon. 

General officers for 1945-47 are president, Fred J. Armstrong, 
I Earrishurg; vice-president p. L. FcConnell, Ilarrisburg; and secretary- 
treasurer, J. "."esley Neville, DuQuom. 

According to the club constitution, its purpose is "to foster 
good fellowship among its members and to discuss and attempt the 
solution of So 1 , -thorn Illinois school or obi ems." 



rr 



Carbondale, 111., Oct. --"Design and Drawings of a School Typing 
Desk" by Van A. Buboltz, assistant professor of commerce, and Pobert 
B, English, assistant professor of industrial education, both on the 
faculty of Southern Illinois Normal University here, has been accepted 
for publication by the In dustrial Arts and Vocational Education 
magazine, 

A previous article by English, titled "projects for Transients," 
'appeared in the September issue of "the magazine. 



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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



10-2-46 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailie; 



Carbondale, 111., Oct. '2 --Award by the Federal Public Housing 
Authority of a construction contract to convert five buildings at the 
Illinois Ordnance Plant into 104 apartments for Southern Illinois 
married veterans who are students at Southern Illinois Normal 
University will soon give the University 209 such apartments, 
University President Chester F. Lay has announced. 

T > T ork on the units at the ordnance plant — to be provided without 
cost to the University—was scheduled to be started September 30 and 
to be completed by December 28. 

"These apartments should enable us to afford housing for a larger 
number of graduate students, since many of the veterans in this 
classification are married and have families," President Lay pointed 
out. 

Under construction on Chautauqua Street, adjacent to the campus 
here in Carbondale, are 105 family units for married veteran students, 
being constructed jointly by the University and the FPHA. almost all 
of the 35 barracks which are bein_ converted into apartments are 
already on the site and undergoing remodeling. 

Installation of utility facilities is not progressing as rapidly 
as University authorities desire, however, because of the difficulty 
of obtaining materials under priority ratings assigned to the 
University for the project. 

Contract awarded by the FPHA to the George L. Cousins Contracting 

Company of St. Louis for the ordnance plant conversion project includes 

all work necessary to complete interior remodeling, installation of 

all utility connections, the provision of individual and approach 

sidewalks, and grading. 

Under the Lanham net, which autnorized the FPHu to provide 
emergency housing for educational institutions, the schools urc 
required to bear expenses in co necLion with furnisn^ng suitable sites, 
rough grading, installation of streets, principal sidewalks and main 
utility lines, as necessary. Since these facilities ure already 
available at the ordnance plant, the family housin^ project theie is 
pot expected to require any construction costs at University expense. 



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Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CARBONDALE - ,l " 10 " 

LORENA DRUMMOND ED. ^■HHBBHH^^HHMMHHHIM^HHM 



10-2-46 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbond,.d e , 111., Oct. 2 — Victorious in their first contest, a 
6-0 win over Kirksville (Mo.) Teachers, the Southern Il_inois Normal 
University Maroons settled down to a tou^h week's grind to iron out 
the rough spots before entertaining the Cape Girardeau Indians next 
Saturday, October 5. 

The Southerner's had to pull the Kirksvili.e contest out of the 
fire with a fourth period touchdown when the Bulldogs charging line 
threatened to stalemate the contest into a scoreless tie. 

Cape Girardeau will come to Carbondale flushed with last week's 
8-0 win over Arkansas State, which is another future opponent of 
Southern. 

Three linemen who shone brightly in last week's tilt were Charles 
"Shag" Crouch of Carbondule, Orm Osborn of Jackson City, Mich., and 
Myron Schuster of Zei^ler. 

Outstanding backfield men were Gene Jtotlar of Pincicneyville , 
Bill Malmsky of Flora, and George Beltz of Marion, 

The Cape Girardeau game will get under way at 2:30 in Macruidrew 
Stadium, home of all Southern contests . 

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^ _ ^_^__ Southern Illinois 

-__-—_-—_ Normal University 

Information Service CARBONDALE - Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND. ED, BaHH^HMMHHI^H^HMBIMi^B^HM 



10-2-/+6 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111., Oct. 2 — Homecoming spirit at Southern Illinois 
University is beginning to grow as Dale Andrews of Mt. Carmel has 
assumed student chairmanship of the Nov* 1-2 festival by nis election 
by campus organization representatives. 

Andrews, a sophomore, is president of the Southern Vttercxns 
Organization on campus, and a member of the Student Council, 
Registered in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, he is 
majoring in government and economics, and minoring in sociology. 

Chairman for the various sub-committees are as follows: finance, 
Richard Capin, ivt. Carmel; dance, Ralph Myers, Grand Chain; campus 
decoration, Avis Frank, Carbondale; pep, Ted Cain, Eldorado; 
publicity, June Ferguson, Herrin; queen's presentation, Malcolm 
Hamby, Zeigler; dance decorations, Chuck Rust, Cairo; concessions, 
Julius Swayne , DuQuoin. 

Faculty chairman of Homecoming this year is Dr. Orville Alexander, 
director of alumni services, who served previously in this capacity 
from 1939 to 1941. 

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Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CARBONDALE - »«i»oi« 

LORENA DRUMMOND. ED. aHgHMMMBBmBBHMHBBBBBHMBmMnBaBHaBMBIMrf I H| 

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10-2-46 
Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Ccirbondale, 111., Oct. 2 — Twelve outstanding exhibits have been 
arranged by the art department of Southern Illinois Normal University 
for the coming year, according to Ben v ~atkins, assistant professor 
of art. 

"What is Modern Painting," the first exhibit, originated with 
the Museum of Modern Art in New York City, and is basically a 
graphic explanation of the meaning of modern painting. The various 
approaches to art such as surrealism, non-objective, abstract, 
impressionism, and expressionism, are explained in lucid terms. 

Color prints of the paintings of artists representative of 
these movements are shown. 

Exhibits to follow include "The Graphic arts "; sculptures by 
Jules Struppeck of Newcomb College, Tulane University; silk screen 
paintings; paintings of Eva Mirabel, artist in residence at Southern; 
Latin-American ceramics; American Indian paintings; "Contemporary 
Trends in Paintings " ; University student exhibits; and exhibits of 
the work of Ben Watkins and Mrs. Dorothea Swan of the Southern 
faculty. 

The exhibits will be displayed in the Little Gallery of Southern 
and are open to visitors. 



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I Southern Illinois 



Normal University 



I 

Information Service cabbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED, 



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Special to Southern Illinois Dailies: 



Carbondale^ Ill,, Oct. 3 — Number tw#~- that is what the Southern Illinois 
Normal University's grid Maroons will be gunning for when they face the 
Southeastern Missouri State Teachers College of Cape Girardeau, at 2j3<6 p.nu 
next Saturday afternoon in MacAndrew Stadium. 

Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin's charges did not look too impressive on the 
offensive when they slipped by the Kirksville (M% ) Teachers last Saturday 
in the season's opener, but the rough edges should be rubbed off and the 
backfield should take on a more machine-like appearance by this week. 

Martin has indicated that he will stick by his starting lineup of • a 
week ago. The line will be as follows t left end, Leedio Cabutti of Johnston 
City; left tackle,, Sam Milesevich of Zeigler; left guard, Myron Schuster <?f 
Zeigler; center, Charles "Shag" Crouch of Carbondale; right guard, Bill 
Cosgrove ©f Benton; right taakle, Jeff Mitchell «f Zeigler; right end, John 
Catlin erf Harrisburg. 

The backfield will be» quarterbatk, Gene Stotlar of Pinckneyville; left 
halfback, Dick Seelman of Flora j right halfback, Bill Malinsky of Fl«ra; 
fullback, Lawrence Calufetti of Zeigler. 

A large crowd is expected as many Missouri rooters and the Cape band 
will make the trip to Carbondale. 

Tickets will go on sale at the box office in front of the MacAndrew 

Stadium at 1*39 p.m. 

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Information Service 

LOBENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CABBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



10-7-46 






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Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Release Wed. Oct. 9 

C^rbondale, 111., Oct. 9 — Extension classes conducted by- 
Southern Illinois Normal University this fall have reached the 
largest group of adults in the history of extension teaching here, 
Raymond H. Dey, director of Extension and Placements Services, 
reports. 

h total of £30 people are enrolled in off -campus courses cond 
conducted by Southern, compared to 599 last fall and the pre-war 
peak of 324 in the fall of 1940. 

The number of courses offered this fall also exceeds that of 
any previous yeo.r, numbering 20. These classes are taught in 1$ 
different co unties by regular University faculty members who drive 
to their weekly class meetings. Some professors travel more than 
100 miles to meet their extension classes, and 100 miles back to 
the campus at Carbondale. 

Enrollment in extension courses, added to the 2,700 students 
currently attending on-Ccimpus courses here, gives the University 
nearly 3,600 students this fail. 

Two of this fall's extension offerings are courses given by the 
College of Liberal ^rts and Sciences, three by the College of 
Vocations and Professions, and 15 by the College of Education. 

Southern's Extension and Placement Services were placed on a 
full-time basis this summer for the first time, when Mr. Dey became 
full-time director. 

" T 'e are gratified at the growth our extension program is 
already showing," University President Chester F. Lay declared, "and 
we hope that under mr. Dey's leadership Southern Ccni develop an 
off -campus instructional urogram that will increasingly meet the 
educational needs of _raduates and other adult citizens o± Southern 
Illinois. 

(more) 



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Information Service 

LORENA DHUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



10-7-46 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Release Wad., October 9 

C.rbondale, 111., October 7 — Dr. J. 7. Meckers, professor and 
chairman of the chemistry department at Southern Illinois Normal 
University, has been appointed as a critic and adviser for a 
national committee which is studying aspects of preparation of future 
high school teachers. 

The committee is the National Committee on Teacher Examinations, 
set up by the American Council on Education, Dr. Meeker s will serve 
as critic and adviser on examinations used to test subject-matter 
preparation of prospective hljn. school teachers of physical sciences. 

In announcing ur. Meckers' appointment to this post, Dr. T. W. 
Abbott, dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Southern, 
declared, Recognition of this sort is stimulating to all of us 
because it is a recognition not only to the individual who receives 
it but to our faculty generally." 



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Carbondale, III. Oct. 7 — To regale visitors at Homecoming, 
November 1, the Little Theater of Southern Illinois Normal University 
will stage the Hart and Kaufman comedy, "You Can't Take It K ith You." 

Directed by Dr. P. Merville Larson, new chairman of the speech 
department who came to Southern this fall, the Homecoming play will 
be selected from well over 100 students who tried out. 

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.^ i^ _ Southern Illinois 

— — — __ Normal University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■BM^HH^MBBBH^Mi^Mn 









"We e; pect to continue our services to tne Teacnert^o^^n^^^^" 
area through our College of Education and the Graduate School, but 
we also want to expand significantly our off-campus courses given 
by the new College of Vocations and Professions and the new College 
of Liberal Arts ana Sciences. 

Largest of the extension classed if> a course in recreational 
music and singing games t being conducted at Pinckneyville by D. S. 
Mcintosh, associate professor of music. Seventy-two are enrolled 
for this class. 

Other classes include the following: 

At anna, health education, taught by Mrs. Louise u'Neil Pcirker, 
60 enrolled. 

/it Belleville, philosophy of education; taught by Dr. Eugene 
R. Fair, dean of the College of Education, 3«> enrolled. 

At Benton, art education, taught by Hiss Lula Roach, 38 enrolled. 

At Carmi, elementary education, taught by J. Ward Dillow, 36 
enrolled. 

At Chester, American public education, taught by Dr. Victor 
Randolph, 56 enrolled. 

At East St. Louis, elementary education, taught by Willis E. 
Malone , kk enrolled. 

at Edwards ville, health education, taught by Mrs. Parker, 65 
enrolled. 

at Fairfield, grammar for teachers, taught by Dr. VT . . B. Schneide 
70 enrolled. 

at Elizabethtown, safety and first aid, taught by Miss Frances 
Phillips, 19 enrolled. 

at Golconda, elementary education, taught by George Bracewell, 
25 enrolled. 

at Harrisburg, rural and elementary curriculum, taught by Mr. 
Bracewell, 23 enrolled. 

at Marion, child development, taught by Dr. Sina M. Mott and 
Miss Helen Narber, 68 enrolled. 

At McLeansboro, child psychology, taught by Dr. Mott, 32 enrolle 

At Mt. Vernon, health education ^nd safety, taught by Frank 
Bridges, 50 enrolled. 









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nt Nashville, child psychology, taught by Dr. H. E. tfosley, 
40 enrolled. 

At New Shawneetown, rural ^nd elementary curriculum, taught by 
Mr. Diiiow, 36 enrolled. 

At Waterloo, American History, taught by Dr. Norman Caldwell, 
33 enrolled. 

At 'vest Frankfort, elementary education, taught by Mr. Malone , 
38 enrolled. 

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Special to Southern Illinois Sports Editors: 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. 7 --Taking to the air in the second 
period, the Southern Illinois Normal Maroons threw a scare into the 
Southeastern Missouri State Indians before succumbing to them 20 to 
13 last Saturday in Macnndrew Stadium. 

Webb Halbei t and John Griffith were the Missouri bi^ guns, with 
Halbert counting all three of Cape's markers. 

For Southern, little Gene Stotlar of Pinckneyvia.le raced 65 
yards for the first tally, and Bill Malinsky of Flora passed to 
Don Creath of East St. Louis who took the toss in the Indians' end 
zone for the Maroons last score. Bill O'Brien of Zeigler and Jack 
Stephens of M, Frankfort combined for the conversion. 

a near capacity crowd, containing Cape Girardeau' s band and 
many of the Missouri students, witnessed the encounter. This was 
the first loss for the Maroons, making their record read one win 
and one loss. The Indians now have a record of two wins -nd one tie. 

Experience and weight told the story in the first half as the 
Missourians marched up and down the field almost at will while the 
Maroons couldn't seem to get set. 

However, midway in the last period, Southern seemed to catch 

fire. With Malinsky pitching strikes, the Maroons took the offensive 

and counted twice before time ran out on them. 

Southern's next home game will be October 9, when they take 
on Arkansas State, Next week, the Maroons will journey to Normal 
where they will tangle with State Normal in their first Illinois 
Inter-collegiate Athletic Conference contest. 

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^^^^^^_^^^^^^^^_ Southern Illinois 

_^__ Normal University 

Information Service M,M,MU ' IUIM " 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■■MHBHMMHHHHHHHMIHBHMBMBMH1 



10-8-46 



Special to Southern -l-llinois Dailies 
Release Friday, October 11 






Carbondale, 111., October 8 --High school bands of Southern Illinois 
will be presented in a giant parade through downtown Carbondale and in a pre-game 
field concert here at Southern Illinois Normal University Nov. 2 as a feature 
of the University's annual homecoming, Dr. Orville Alexander, homecoming 
faculty chairman-, has announced. 

Directed by Dr. Maurits Kesnar, new chairman of the Southern music 
department, the bands will march downtown Saturday at noon, then back to the 
University campus to march on the field at MacAndrew Stadium before the kick-off 
of the Southern-Eastern football game. 

Invitations are going out to some 50 high school bands asking them to be 
on hand for this occasion, and verbal acceptances have already been received 
from approximately half of this number, Dr. kesnar said. 

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Carbondale, 111., Oct. 8 —A fifth ^.200 scholarship to Southern Illinois 
Normal University will be awarded by the Illinois Congress of Parents and Teachers 
to a graduate of a high school affiliated with the ICPT, according to Dr. Vera 
L. Peacock, chairman of the University committee on standards, honors, and 
scholarships. 

Applications should be made to Dr. Peacock by Oct., 15. Additional 






requirements for the award are high scholastic standing, sterling character, 
good health, and lack of means to complete desired training. 

The high schools in this area affiliated with the ICPT are Brecse, Bunker 
Hill, Cairo, Carbondale, Chester, Chesterfield, Cobden, Coffeen, Columbia, 
Edwardsville, Greenville, Hillsboro, Johnston City, Kinmundy, Lebanon, Litchfield,. 
Madison, Mascoutah, Noble, Opdyke, pinckneyviile, Royalton, St. Jacob, Thebes, 
1/Uterloo, White Hall, Mtt, and Parkersburg„ 

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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



10-8-46 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Release Friday, October 11: 



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Carbondale, 111., October 8 --Plans for a huge all-Southern Illinois 
presentation of the oratoria, "The Messiah," were announced today by Southern 
Illinois Normal University. 

The production, to be presented early in December, will be under the 
direction of Dr. Maurits Kesnar, new chairman of the University's music department. 

It is hoped that this production will be the first of an annual series 
presented by a massed choir and orchestra of Southern Illinois musicians, 
possibly to be organized as a Southern Illinois Oratorio Society, Dr. Kesnar said, 

Every singer in Southern Illinois who is interested in performing in "The 
Messiah" is urged to attend the first rehearsal on Wednesday evening, October 
^16, in The Little Theater on the University campus. First mass orchestra 
rehearsal will be held October 24, in Shryock Auditorium, String musicians 
of Southern Illinois are invited to attend. 

The Egyptian Choir of West Frankfort and the miest Frankfort Orchestra 
have already accepted the invitation to participate, Dr. Kesnar said. 

Dr. &esnar himself will direct the orchestra, while the choir will be 
directed by Floyd V. intake land, associate professor of voice. Rehearsals will be 
held every Wednesday evening from 7j-30 to 9 p.m. 

Outstanding soloists will be engaged for the performance, Dr. ^esnar said, 
chosen from the concert stage. 

This will be Dr. Kesnar' s 25th presentation of "The Messiah*" Last year 
while at Augustana College he produced this Handel, oratorio with Miss Camille 
Anderson, Miss Eileen Law, John Toms and James W. McEnery as soloists. The 
production was broadcast nationally over Mutual Net r ork, by special permission 
of the American Federation of Musicians. 

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Southern Illinois 



Normal University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■HHBBBBBHHHMHHBMaBHHBMMaB 



10-8-46 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Release Friday, Oct, 11, or later: 






Carbondale, 111., October 8 —Five delegates from the College of Education 
of Southern Illinois Normal University attended the national Rural Youth of the 
United States of America meeting held at Jackson's Mill in west Virginia, October 
3-6. 

The delegates were Edward L. Allen, critic at the University Buncombe rural 
training school and sponsor of the Rural Youth Group there; Myrna Lou Presley, 
senior at University aigh School; Phoebe Cox, president of the Buncombe Rural 
Youth Group; Lois Rowland, secretary of the University Rural Life Club, and 
George Bracewell, associate professor and sponsor of Southern's Rural Life Club. 

Mr. Bracewell gave an introductory speech on "How Help People Live Outside 
My community," which was followed by general group discussion by the young 
people. After several introductory talks were made by notable speakers, the 
young people conducted their discussions ana presented their own ideas and 
problems. 

Problems of rural youth were approached from the angles of "How can young 
people best increase their understanuing of people in other communities and other 
countries?", "what are the best ways of extending our relations with and/ to 
other communities, other states, other nations?", What can I do?", u i»hat can my 
club do?" 

Miss Cox lead a discussion on "How Help People Live Outside My Community," 
and Miss Rowland on "How To Help People Live in my Community." 

Approximately 300 attended the meeting, representing 21 states. The 22 
from Illinois met after the general meeting and reorganized the Illinois Rural 
Youth Association, which disintegrated during the war. Lois Rowland was elected 
president. The group will have a state conference in the spring. 

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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Release Friday, Oct. 11 



10-5-46 



Carbondale, 111,, Oct. 8 —On Saturday, November 16, Southern Illinois 
Normal University will play host to the Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic 
Conference Cross Country run, Coach Leland P. "Doc" Lingle announced. This meet 
will be held in conjunction with an invitational open affair, in which all 
colleges in Illinois are invited to compete. 

Southern will attempt to defend it's 1945 I,I,A 6 C. cross country crown when 
the harriers take off on the 3~jjr mile Carbondale hill-and-dale course, 

More than thirty men have turned out for cross-country practice to date, 
Lingle said. However, only one, Bob Smith of M&rissa, has a lottci from Southern 
in this event. 

Two men who will be remembered from previous year's track service are 
Allison Golden of Belleville and Louis Pechineno of Christopher. 

Leonard Burden of Herrin and Glenn Hamilton oi Pinckneyville, track 
candidates from 1945 are also on hand. 

The rest of the men s who are unknown quantities as yst, are: Glen Elaok 
of Fairfield; Ray Walker of 'Swings Bob Lunneman of F'viic'cieyvillej Don .ulnar of 
Granite Cityj Don Willi of DuQucin; Slf, H« Keens of Carrier Mills; Bob Neighbors 
of Belleville; Bob Etherton of Murphysboroj Bob Bunder of Belleville, Bill 
Thompson of East St .Louis; Harry Dell of Vienna; v/illiam Burns of Chicago; 
Richard Newby of Ridgfarm; Bill Dorris of Benton; Tom Bryant of Ridg\vay; Marion 
Hall oi" Thompsonville; Edward Bellamy of Vienna; Bill Hayes of Benton; Oscar 

Stanford of Salem; Gene Harrison of Fairfield; Tom Evans of East St. Louis; 

« 

Dean Harrison of Fairfield, 

The Maroons expect to card two meets before the conference battle, Lingle 
announoed. 

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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Release Friday, Oct. 11 



10-8-46 



Carbondale, 111., Oct. 8 —Looking for the victory trail and also a chance 
to get off on the right foot in the Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference 
gridiron race, the Southern Illinois Normal University Maroons will journey to 
Normal, Illinois, on Saturday, October 12, where they will tangle with the 
Illinois State Normal Red Birds. 

So far this season the Maroons have broken even in the win-and-loss 
column; winning the curtain raiser from Kirksville (Ho.) Teachers 6-0, and 
dropping the second tilt 20-13 to Southeastern Missouri State, 

The Red Birds have took the field three times this season and came away 
with two impressive victories, one over DePauw, the other over Michigan State. 
The Birdies dropped their opening contest to Indiana State. 

The Southerners have not been too impressive in their two contests so far, 

but in the last period in the Cape Girardeau game, they seemed to catch fire 

with a brilliant aerial attack. Bill Malinsky of Flora seemed to' take over the 

passing duties, while Gene Stotlar showed that he could do more than hand the 

ball off, as he reversed his 'field and ran 65 jards for a touchdown last 

Saturday, 

A threat that the Southerners must contend with is found in Bloice Bess, 
veteran halfback, who has already become respected by Normal opponents so far 
this season. 

State Normal will be out to defend their 1945 I.I.A.C. crown against the 
runner-up Maroons when the two elevens clash on McCormick Field. 

Southern's Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin has indicated that he will string along 
■with the starting line-up used in the two previous contests. It will be as 
follows: left end, Sam Milosevich of Zeigler; left tackle, Jeff Mitchell of 
Zeigler; left guard, Myrcn Schuster of Zeigler; center, Charles "Shag" Crouch 
of Carbondale; right guard, Bill Cosgrove of Benton; right tackle, Jim Lovin of 
Benton; right end, John Catlin of Harrisburg. 

In the backfield the Maroons will look like this: quarterback, Gene 
Stotl&r of Pinckneyville; left halfback, Dick Seelman of Flora; right halfback, 
Bill Malinsky of Flora; full back, Lawrence Calufetti of Johnston City. 



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Information Service 

LORENA DBUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Release Tuesday 



10-14-46 



Carbondale, 111., Oct. - Launching Southern Illinois Uormal University's 
1946-47 radio "broadcasting schedule, University President Chester F. Lay will 
go on the air Wednesday, Oct. 16, to discuss "Education Looks Ahead," on 
"The Southern Hour." 

"The Southern Hour," a weekly "broadcast each Wednesday afternoon from 2:30 
to 3 p. m. over Station WJPF, Herrin, this year will present informative 
programs on educational trends and sidelights on educational activities in an 
eight-month series of interviews and round table discussions. 

President Lay will discuss broad aspects of education as affected "by the 
1 rge numbers of returning war veterans to the nation's campuses, the impact of 
atomic energy, and other trends. He will report "briefly on Southern's own 
post-war program. 

A second radio series will be beamed from Southern each Friday afternoon 
over both Station WJPF, Herrin, and Station WEEQ,, Harris"burg, at the same time, 
2:30 to 3 p. m. As in former years, this program, known as "Education Time," will 
"be directed at the public school classrooms of Southern Illinois. This fall, 
this series will feature the popular "quiz program" idea, with public school 
students participating. 

"Education Time" will first present Miss Helen Narber, assistant professor 
in the Allyn Training School at Southern, with a group of her first grade 
pupils, in a discussion and quiz program entitled "Teaching Is Pun." 

Sponsored hy the Universitjr Information Service, these radio programs will 
use "live" music furnished "by student orchestras. 

Dr. P. Merville Larson, associate professor and chairman of the speech 
department, will direct "The Southern Hour" while Willis E. Mai one of the 
College of Education will continue to direct "Education Time." 




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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Release on receipt 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



10-14-46 



Carhondale, 111,, Octoher 14 — Getting off on the right foot in the 194.6 
Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference grid race, the Southern Illinois 
Normal University Maroons last Saturday at Normal scored twice in the last period 
to Illinois State Normal University's once, taking a 13 to 6 decision from the 
mid-staters. 

In a contest that was dominated "by Southern Much more than the score indicates, 
the Maroons were not ahle to cross their foes' goal line until the fourth period, 
when Bill Malinsky of Flora, flipped a 25-yard pass to Boh Colhorn, also of 
Flora, from the Maroon 20-yard line. Colhorn galloped the remaining 55 yards 
and Southern led 6-0. 

A few minutes later Gene Stotlar of Pinckneyville passed to Joe Franza of 
Murphyshoro for the Maroons' second touchdown. Lawrence Calufetti of Johnston 
City converted, and it looked as though Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin's charges 
were destined to whitewash the Red Birds 13-0. 

However, with four minutes remaining in the fray, Normal tailhack Baker 
handed the hall off on a pass play to his half hack. The pass to the end was 
complete and as the Maroons were smearing the Red Bird end, he lateraled to 
Baker who crossed Southern* s goal line for Normal' s only score of the day. 

The Maroons racked up 14 first downs' to their opponents' five, and twice 
the Martin-men made costly fumhles inside Normal's five-yard line that made 
the final score seem closer than the actual play was. 

Next Saturday the Maroons will play host to Arkansas State in a non-conference 
battle that is scheduled to get under way at 2:30 p.m. in MacAndrew Stadium. 

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Southern Illinois 
University 



Normal 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. bi^i^-^^^^^,^^-^,,,, 



10-14-46 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Release Tuesday 



Carbondale, 111., Oct. 14 — A new men's lounge has been opened for Southern 
Illinois Formal University's 1,907 men students this week in a residence across 
the street from the main campus. 

The veterans' lounge, in operation since last spring in the Old Science 
Building, has "been moved to 1010 Thompson Street, to one of the residences 
purchased in the University's current land acquisition program* and will now 
he open to all men students. 

Two offices are provided in the new lounge, one for Glenn J. McGowan, 
advisor to president Chester P. Lay, on verterans 1 affairs, and the other 
for William H. Winkelmeyer, local representative of the Illinois Veterans 
Coramussion. 

M. Jl M. 

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Carbondale, 111*, Oct. 14 — A new ""ost office" has been opened this week 
at Southern Illinois ITgrmal University to serve the expanding faculty and 
student body. 

While not a branch U. S. post office, the new office furnishes mail boxes 
for all faculty members, and will sort and weigh outgoing mail. Ecurs are 
from 8 to 12 and 1 to 4:^0 each day that the University is in session. Mrs. 
Dorothy Hunter is in charge. 

# # # 

Carbondale, 111,, Oct. 14 — G-uest speaker for the student ' assembly at 
Southern Illinois Normal University on Thursday, Oct. 17, will be &-- orge L. 
Davis, director of student affairs at Purdue University, President Chester F. 
Lay has announced. 






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lilt 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED, 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Release Wednesday 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



10-14-46 



ill 



Carbondale, 111., Oct, 16 --"Green thumb" experts from all over Southern 
Illinois are gathered here today as guests of Carbondale* s two garden clubs 
and Southern Illinois Normal University for a "harvest fair" and garden tour. 

The gymnasium in the Old Science Building on the University campus is 
converted into a veritable hothouse, with exhibits ol petunias, zinnias, marigolds, 
asters, snapdragons, dahlias, gladiolas, delphiniums, coxcomb, roses, chrysanthemums, 
and flower arrangements 

Vegetables — tomatoes, carrots, corn, peppers, potatoes, squash, turnips, 
pumpkin, onions, beans, parsnips, etc. --are alao in display, 

Adding variety to the growers' exhibits are arts and crafts, block prints,, 
collections of handiwork and of flowers and vegetables, house plants, wild life, 
wild flowers, junior weaving, table and mantel displays. 

Special exhibits are shown by several University departments — art, agriculture, 
home economics, botany and zoology. 

Present for the occasion are Mrs. Daniel E. Kissam of Slencoe, state 
president of the garden clubs; Mrs. J. W. Ginsburg of Mt. Vernon, §outh regional 
chairman; and other officers. Delegations of garden lovers from other communities 
of Southern i llinois--some having as many as 30 members--have come to attend 
the show. 






IL 



Southern 111. Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111., Oct. -It's four to one that the Home- 
coining '^ueen at Southern Illinois Normal University this year will 
be a brunette I 

At least, students have chosen as their top five candidates 
for this honor four brunettes and one honey blond. 

Picking these top five from a field of ten nominees, the 
student body has determined that all five will be in the Queen's 
Court, but which of the five got the highest number of votes and 
will be the Queen is the ^64 question. 

Her identity will not be revealed until the moment of her 
coronation at the Homecoming Dance Saturday night at 11 o'clock. 

The top five: Kathryn Alley of Sparta, president of Delta 
Sigma Epsilon sorority, Little Theater actress, and Homecoming 

Publicity committee member. 

Joan Fairbairn of Harvey, independent, member of the Student 

Council, member of Girls' Rally, service organization. 

Aliene Kauzlarich of Christopher, independent, member of 

Independent Student Union, member of Girls Rally, 

Barbara Melvin of DuQuoin, member of Sigma Sigma Sigma 

sorority, member of Girls Rally, majorette for the Maroon Band. 

Velma KcCormick of Johnston City, vice-president of Pi Kappa 

Sigma sorority, member of Pan-Hellenic inter-sorority council, 

member of Girls Rally. 

Also elected by students as junior attendants for the t^ueen 

are Elizabeth Bonner of Fairfield and Dorothea Gahan of Flora. 

The Queen nominees will be introduced at the Little Theater 
play on Friday night, will be entertained at a t ueen 4 s Breakfast 
Saturday at 12 o'clock, will be presented before the football 
crowd just before the kick-off of the Southern-Eastern game. 



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Rel-ease on receipt 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. - Although it was Western's 
Homecoming football game, the Southern Illinois Normal University 
Maroons took over and when the festivities were done, the score board 
showed a 19-7 Southern win. 

The Southern cross-country team finished the half-time run 
in a 30-30 dead heat with the host harriers while the Monmouth thinly- 
clads wound up third with 6l+ points. 

Before the largest crowd ever to witness a home football game at 
Macomb, the Maroons, behind brilliant line play and fancy stepping 
backs scored once in each of the second, third, and fourth periods 
to take their second conference game without a loss, and making their 
season's record show three victories against two defeats. 

The Leathernecks delighted the partisan crowd by punching across 
a touchdown in the middle of the first period and taking a 7-0 lead. 
However, their joy was shortlived when, on the second play of the 
second quarter, Bob Johnson of Itoyalton stepped off 40 yards of fancy 
broken field running and crossed Western's goal line. The conversion 
missed and the Leathernecks led 7-6 when the halftime came. 

The third period Maroon score broke the hearts of the Homecoming 
fans, as Bill Malinsky of Flora, playing at quarterback in this 
contest, shot a 30yeard touchdown pass to Gaie Stotlar of 
Pinckneyville , who has been moved to right halfback. This time 
Captain Lawrence Calufetti of Johnston City kicked the extra point and 
Southern took a 13-7 lead, never to be headed again. 

The Maroons put the game game on ice in the fourth quarter when 
the desperate Westerners took to the air. On a pass play, the 
Southern line broke through and rushed the passer, and he dropped a 
slfaort pass into the hands of Stotlar who galloped 25 yards for the 
score. The conversion missed ajsjain, but the Maroons were able to 
coast in on their 19-7 lead, despite the val/iantEbshcx drive put on 
by the keyed-up Leathernecks in the last seconds of the game. 

The harriers were not so fortunate as the}' were held to a tie 









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for the 3.6 mile hill and dale course. The winning time was 

a slow 19.44. 

The thinlyclads finished as follows: first — Green (W); second 
--Bill Keene of Carrier Kills (S); third— Petit (W); fourth- 
Glen Hamilton of Pinckneyville (S); fifth— Hasanx Hemphill (¥); 
sixth— Leonard Burden of Herrin (S); seventh— Dickson (W) ; 
eighth — Bob Lunneman of Pinckneyville (S); ninth — McCaig (M); 
tenth— Edward Killer of Garbondale (S); eleventh—Stone (M) ; twelfth 
— Leary (M); thirteenth — no finisher; fourteenth — Brown (W); 
fifteenth— DeMorest (M)« 

The next southern home football game is scheduled for November 
2, when the Maroons meet Eastern in the annual Homecoming game here. 



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lit 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 




Release Friday p. m. 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. - Fielding a team that is shot with 
injuries, Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin will send his Southern Illinois 
Normal University Maroons out in quest of their third victory in 
four starts when they square off against Arkansas State in Mac Andrew 
Stadium at 2:30 p. m. next Saturday in a non-conference football 
fray. 

The Southerners T victory over State Normal last week was a costly 
one as Galan Davis of DuQuoin, Orm Osborn of Jackson City, Mich, 
Charles "Shag" Crouch of Carbondale, Bill Malinsky of Flora, Myron 
Schuster of Murphysboro, and J. Pieron of Murphysboro all turned up 
with minor injuries and, according to Martin, will be used sparingly 
in the Arkansas tilt. 

The strength of the two teams can be somewhat compared as they 
have both met and have both been defeated by Southeastern Missouri 
State College. Arkansas State went down to the tune of $-0, while 
Southern lost out by a 20-13 margin. 

Arkansas State has a new coach this year in the person of 

Forrest "Frosty" England, formerly mentor of University City (Mo.) 

high school, and boasts such Southern Illinois stars as Arthur "Sonny" 

Kramer of Collinsville , Benny Wilhelm of Taylorville, and Dale Hudson 

and Jim Jordan of Jacksonville. 

The Southern lineup will be as follows: left end, Joe Franza 
of Murphysboro; left tackle, Jim Lovin of Benton; left guard, Bob 
Etheridge of Fairfield; center, Charlie Heinz of Gillespie; right 
guard, Bill Cos grove of Benton; right tackle, Charles Mathiew of 
Eldorado, right end, Leedio Cabutti of Johnston City; quarterback, 
Gene Stotlar of Pinckneyville ; left halfback, Dick Seelman of Flora; 
right halfback, Jack Stephens of W. Frankfort; fullback, Lawrence 
Calufetti of Johnston City. 

Arkansas State will start Shearburn and Ledbetter at ends, 
Wilhelm and Hudson at tackles, Radison and Phelps at guards, Parker 
at Center, Underwood at quarterback, Atkins and Coleman at halfback, 
and Bolton at fullback. 

Tickets for the game will ro on sale at 1:30 p. m. on Saturday 
in front of Mac Andrew Stadium, home of all Southern contests. 



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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Normal 



Special to Southern Illinois Lailies 
Release Friday p.m. 



Carbondale, 111., Oct. — Twenty- five basketball contests have been carded 
for the Southern Illinois Normal University 1946-47 schedule, Athletic Director 
and Basket Eall Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin announced. The Maroons also plan to 
participate in two tournaments. 

The following are the home tilts to be played in MacAndrew Stadium in 
Carbondale; November 30-0nized Glass and Shefford Cheese;- December 3— Meramec 
Caverns; 18-Arkansas State; 20-Indiana State; January 7-Evansville College; 11- 
Western Illinois State Teachers; 14-Southeastern Missouri State; 18— Eastern 
Illinois State Teachers; 20— Milliken University; 25-Northern Illinois State 
Teachers; February 5— Chicago University; 24-Illinois Normal University. 

The Maroons will leave home for these contests: December 6-3t. Louis 
University; 7-Vvashington University (St. Louis); 9-Western Kentucky (Paducah); 
14-Loy»la University; January 16-Evansville College;- 29-Southeastern Missouri 
State; February 1-Illinois Normal University; 8-Indiana State; 14-V';e stern Illinois 
State Teachers; 15-Milliken University; 21-vvestern Illinois State Teachers; 22- 
Chicago University; March 1-Northern Illinois State Teacher s„ 

In addition to the regular season's card, the Maroons will enter a four-team 

Christmas holiday tournament to be held at Kansas City on December 27 and 28, 

Southern, last year's tilfcle holder, will also be automatically entered in the 

National IntercallegiaAe Easketball Tournament which will be held in the middle 

of March, also in Kansas Citv, Martin said. 

# # If 



Carbondale, 111,, Oct. — The Southern Illinois Normal 
tensity ;! r ;; football squad dropped a 21*0 contest to the St. Louii 
Un I vers it 7 reserves on T'onday, October 14, The B ills pushed a 
touchdown and poiiit conversion across in each of the first three 
periods to down their inexperienced opponents. This v;as the I'aroon 
FB" eleven's first contest of die season. 



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Southern Illinois 
University 



Normal 



Information Service carbondalb, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. m ^^^^^^^ m ^^^^^^^ mm ^— mm 



10-16-46 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies and Radio Stations 
Release Friday p.m. 



Carbnndale, 111., Oct. — The dairy nerds at Southern Illinois Normal 
Univer ity are entirely free of the dreaded Bangs Disease, which annually costs 
dairy farmers of Illinois between $4,000,000 and $5,000,000, Conrad White, 
assistant professor of agriculture, reports proudly. 

Blood samples from the Guernsey and Hereford herds on the University Farm 
were tested recently "by Dr. G. V. Keller, deputy state veterinarian, and were 
found to "be disease free. 

Milk from cows infected with Bangs Disease causes undulent fever in human 
beings who drink it, Mr. White explained, adding that this fever is one of the 
most prolonged and debilitating diseases to which the human body is susceptible 
running for years. 

"In addition to the danger to human beings, there is a great economic loss 
in livestock production," he declares. "This amounts to between four and five 
million dollars annually in Illinois." 

Findings of Professor Bang of Denmark, who first discovered the germ 
causing Bangs Disease in 1896, were substantiated in 1910 by the Illinois 
Agricultural 3&ip or inynt Station, Mr. White pointed out. 

Today a testing program 'is being carried on by the U. S. Department of 
Agriculture, Bureau of Animal Industry, with the cooperation of the Illinois 
Department of Agriculture, to seek out and control the disease. 



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This program calls for three optional plans: (l) herd testing and 
slaughtering of animals reacting positively to the tests; (2) herd testing with 



slaughter of reacting animals and vaccination of all calves; (3) herd testing 
with deferred slaughtering of reacting animals and calf hood vaccination. 

Only positive safeguard against human infection with undulent fever from 
Bangs Disease is for each family (l) to make sure that all milk used cor.ies from 
animals certified to he disease free, and (2) to insist on pasteurized milk. 

"There are still a few small dairies which do not pasteurize," Dr. R. C. 
Cassell, chairman of the University's agriculture department, said. "The public 
should insist on pasteurization." 

Home-produced milk which comes from cows infected with Bang's Disease 
should he carefully pasteurized "by "boiling for 30 minutes at 145° F., Mr. White 
said. 

"It is the plan of those in charge of the animal husbandry work at the 
University farm to continue the disease testing program and to bring to the 
farm only animals that have a health certificate showing them to be disease- 
free animils. 

# # # 



_ _^_ _«__ __.._..,_ Southern Illinois 

— — . Normal University 

Information Service carbondali, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■nUHHHHBMBM^MHm 



10-17-46 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Release Saturday 



L 



Carbondale, 111,, Oct,. -19 — Southern Illinois Formal University has been 
selected "by the University Christian Missions of the Federal Council of Churches 
as one of 20 colleges and universities in the nation to hold a Religious Emphasis 
Week this fall. 

Dates for this special week of religious programs have "been set for 
November 3-8, 

A full week of evening addresses, open to the public, by nationally known 
religious leaders; informal discussion groups; meetings with students in their 
fraternity, sorority, and. boarding houses; and talks before classes, will be 
presented, according to David S. Mcintosh, associate professor of music, who is 
general chairman for Religious Emphasis Week. 

Among the author: bies in world affairs, sociology, journalism and missions 
who will be guest speakers for Religious Smphasis Week will be Dr. Clark Ellzey, 
specialist in marriage and family relations, professor at Stephens College, 
Columbia, Mo; Dr. James Nichols, co-editor of "The Journal of Religion" and 
professor of the history of Christianity at the University of Chicago; Mrs. Anna 
Mow, formerly missionary to India, now professor of Christian education at 
Bethany Seminary in Chicago; and the Rev. Bayard Clark, minister at Cape 
Girardeau, Mo, 

This will be the second Religious Smphasis Week held at Southern in the 
past two years, the first being the occasion of the establishment of the 
Student Christian Foundation, campus all-denominational religious organization. 
The 1944 week however, was conducted entirely locally, though with national 
leaders on its program, many of them the same authorities furnished by the 
University Christian Missions of the Federal Council of Churches, 

The Student Christian Foundation was instrumental in "bringing the nationally- 
sponsored Religious Emphasis Week to the campus this year. 

Among the other colleges and universities holding Religious Emphasis "eek 
this year are the state Universities of Oregon, Iowa, North Carolina, Montana, 

Ohio, and Bethany College in 'Test Virginia. 

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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND ED, 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE. ILLINOIS 



ii 



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Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Release on receipt 



Carbondale, 111., Oct. 17 — Engagement of Johnny "Scat" Davis and his 
17-piece orchestra to play for the Southern Illinois Normal University Homecoming 
Dance here November 2 has been announced bj>- Ralph Myers of Grand Chain, student 
chairman of the dance band committee. 

Dovis and his " swee t- and- swing" band have recently returned from an extended 
engagement in Reynosa, Mexico f and have an impressive string of triumphs in 
ballrooms night clubs and theaters of the country to their credit, including 
Chicago' s Aragon, Trianon, Rainbo rooms and the Black Hawk Restaurant. 

Featured vocalist for the Homecoming Dance will be Jeff Lane and Nadine 
Vaughn. 

Davis started his orchestra career at the age of 10, plaj^ed with such 
well-known bands as Jimmy Joy's, Smith Ballew, Red Nichols, Will Osborne, and 
finally joined Fred Waring and his Pennsylvanians for seven years. 

Hiss Hollyi'/ood bow was in themmotion picture "Varsity Show," followed by 
"Brother Rat," "Cowboy from Brooklyn," etc. It was in Hollywood in 1939 that 
he organized his own orchestra, which he has led ever since, except during the 
war years when his men went into the armed forces and he himself served on the 
Armed Forces Entertainment Committee. He m.c.'d shows for the 28 Army and Navy 
receiving hospitals in the San Francisco area, went on tour with camp shows, and 
played nearly every Army camp and Nav T ' base in the country. 

He reorganized his band in August, 1945, oand put the big new outfit on the 
road. 

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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



10-17-46 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
> Release Saturday 



Carbondale, 111., Oct. 18 --Three retiring faculty members of Southern 
Illinois Normal University were honored with a banquet at the cafeteria tonight — 
Miss Florence A. wells and C. C. Logan, both assistant professors at University 
high school, and William M. Bailey, assistant professor of botany. 

Dr. Bailey, chairman of the botany department until the time of his re-tirement 
received his bachelor of arts and bachelor of science degrees from Campbell 
College, and his master of science and doctor degrees at the University of 
Chicago. He joined the Southern faculty in 1914, 

Mr. Logan, who was director of the University f ilm service at the time of 
his retirement, came in 1923. He is a graduate of the University of Illinois, 

Miss Wells taught English for many years in University high, having been 
on the faculty since 1927. She is a graduate of Southern, and took her master 
of arts degree at the University of Illinois, 

Books were presented to each of the three by Miss Evelyn Rieke, assistant 
professor and dean of girls at University high, Dilla Hall, assistant professor 
of University high, and Bill Marberry, assistant professor of botany, ^ respectively. 

Speaker for the occasion 'was President Chester F. Lay. Special music for 

the occasion was arranged by Dr. Maurits Kesnar, chairman of the music department. 

The banquet was arranged by a committee headed by Mrs. Mabel Pulliam, housing 

counselor. 

# # * 



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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED, 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Release on receipt 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



10-17-46 



Carbondale, 111., Oct. 17 — Colleges and universities should he preparing 
young people for life in the smaller communities and rural areas, rathern than in 
the crowded metropolitan centers, Southern Illinois Normal University President 
Chester F. Lay declared in a radio interview this week. 

Expressing grave concern at the consequences of the discovery of atomic 
bomb, he said, "The whole world seems bent on self-destruction, and some people 
even think it not at all inconceivable that within a lifetime — if indeed not 
with in a very short span of years — the population that remains might "be driven 
hack to the caves, to living underground. 

"If that is the case, even though it may seem an extreme case, all of us 
should he learning something ahout how to exist with nothing hut our own hands 
to keep life together. 

"We ought to be learning how to get along with nature, and how to use nature 
for our own self-preservation." 

Dr. Lay expressed the belief that there may yet be "time for the world to 
stop its headlong rush to self-destruction. . ..time for us all to learn to live 
together as civilized human beings." 

Education has a special 'obligation in this effort, he asserted. 

"Education must leave no stone unturned — in the classroom, on the public 

platform, in the daily contacts of teachers with the public—to strive for 

world understanding and to help develop grounds for mutual confidence," the 

(more) 



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University president pointed out. 

"We must try to understand the currents of international affairs, and lend 
our support and convictions to efforts that may yet "build world peace. We must 
train young men and women to take their places in international and domestic 
affairs who may yet succeed where we have so far failed." 

Elaborating on his proposal that colleges and universities should train 
their students for small-town and rural life t President Lay pointed out that an 
atomic "bomb dropped on St. Louis, 95 miles from the University campus, could 
"wipe out the very hub of the country's transportation system," and that its effects 
would "be drastically felt on this campus. 

"What I am getting at is this — our whole way of life is threatened "by the 
discovery of the atom bomb," he aaid. 

"It becomes increasingly apparent that decentralization of industry an d 
decentralization of population should be carried out, and quickly. 

"I think that instead of preparing our students for professions that will 
take them to the big cities, we should be preparing them to return to the smaller 
communities, where life may be simpler and opportunities may not be quite so great 
for financial success, but where existence may be safer — •safer from atomic attack." 

Asked by what kind of training he would prepare students for such living, 

he said, "Well, for example, I think there should be a far greater emphasis on 

agriculture, and more of our students should bo encouraged to go into scientific 

farming. 

"More of our girls should be studying home economics. More of our students 
should be planning to become small businessmen in small towns, working on their 
own rather than going into large businesses and industries that are concentrated 
In the metropolitan areas. 

"Actually, I think we need to be providing instruction in how to exist close 
to the earth, and to draw subsistence from the earth if it becomes necessary." 

# # # 



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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Speci; 1 to Southern Illinois Dailies & "Weeklies 
Release on recciot 



10-18-46 






Carbondale, 111., Oct. 18 — plans for the biggest Homecoming c cole oration 
in history ere "being made at Southern Illinois Normal University as the campus 
prepares to welcome literally thousands of former students for the wto-day 
alumni reunion Nov. 1-2. 

Students last week "balloted to nominate ten candidates for the coveted 
position of Homecoming Queen, and 'nominated nine f r r shmen and sophomore girls for 
the two places of queen's attendants. 

The Homecoming dance committee has announced that Johnny "Scat" Davis will 
"bring his 18-piece orchestra, to play for the bell on Saturday night, Ifov. 1 • 
Dance space will he greatly enlarged to accommodate the huge crowd anticipated. 

Southern Maroons will tackle Eastern Illinois State Teachers College on the 
football field in the Homecoming game Saturday afternoon, starting at 2:30. 

On Friday evening, ITov. 1, the Little Theater will produce its annual 
Homecoming play, this year presenting the hilarious Kaufman and Connelley comedy 
"You Can't Take It tfith You." 

A so -ond balloting will be held Thursday, Oct. 24, to select the top-ranking 
favorite among the nominees for Srueen, with the t"o runner&-up serving in her 
court. The Queen's identity will not be known until the moment of her presentation 
and coronation at the Homecoming Dance, Nov. 1." 

Nominated for Queen were the following girls: Barbara Melvin of DuQuoin; 

Catherine Sullivan of Harrisburg, Marilyn Henderson of Marion, Joan Feirbairn 

of Harvey, Kathryn Allen of Car 'Ondale, Yelme. HcCormich of Johnston City, Aliene 

Kauzlarich of Christopher, Eleanor White of Equality, and Phyllis Roy of Gary, Ind. 

nominated for junior attendants, two to be selected, were Srma Douglas of 
Dongola, Dorthea Grahen of Flora, Elizabeth Bonner of Fairfield, Georgia Mircheff 
of Madison, Marian McKemis of Benton, Billie Lane Hagler of Murphysboro , Nada 
Kauzlarich of Christopher, Florcance Grim of Cprbondale, Bessie Mae Ice of 
".."est Frankfort. 



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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND. ED, 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



10-18-46 



C0EHECTI0N 

Note to Editor: In the storjr mailed you yesterday concerning the dinner 
given in honor of retiring faculty members Dr. W. M.Bailey, Miss Floreance Wells 
and Mr. C. C. Logan, Dr. Bailey's title was given as "assistant professor of 
botany." Dr. Bailey was a full professor until his retirement this fall. We 
regret this inadvertent error, and hope it nay he possible for you to make the 
correction before publication. 






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Southern Illinois 
University- 



Normal 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. W^BMMH^^^^^^m^^hm^— «— . 



10-^1-46 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Release T ednesday p.m, 



Car bond.-le , 111., Oct. 23 — dueet speaker for the student 
ssembly this week at Southern Illinois Normal University, Oct. 24 
v/ill be Dr. Ghanning Liem, Korean-born lecturer at many American 
universities , President Chester F. Lay has announced. 

Dr. Liem will speak on Far Eastern affairs in general., and on 
the problems of Korea in particular. 

After studying in the traditional Confucian school, he entered 
modern Christian schools in China. In 1930 he came to America, and 
studied in Lafayette College, Bucknell University and Princeton 
University, where he obtained the master of arts .no doctor of 
philosoph" decrees. 

He has served as part-time assistant at the School of i ublic 
and International affairs of Princeton University, .and has 
delivered lectures ana conducted forums at many universities. 

it u u 

Release on receipt 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. 21 --A two-day chili. d guidance clinic 
will be held at Southern Illinois Normal University '"ednesday and 
Thursday, Oct. 23 and 24, Dr. \I. A. Thalman, director of Southern's 
Child Guidance Clinic, has announced. 

These special clinics are held each cuarter by the University 
in cooperation with t he Illinois Institute for' Juvenile Research. 
Consultants for this lall clinic will be Dr. Sophie Schroeder and 
Mrs, Eadith Morales from Chicago. 

Mornings wilo. be devoted to diagnosing individual selected 
children, with discussions ana recommendations being worked out 
in the afternoon. In addition, t\.o seminars will be held, the 
Wednesday afternoon one on techniques, prodecures and therapy for 
solving individual cases, the Thursday one on psychiatry, 

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Information Service 



,. 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Release on receipt 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



10-21-46 



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Carbondale, 111., Oct. 21 — President Chester F. Lay of Southern 
Illinois Normal University Monday participated in a"deba~ce if before 
the University of Chicago Teacher Education Conference on the 
subject, "Should Teachers Colleges Be State Colleges?" 

Dr. Lay joined with President G. T :J. Dieraer of Central Missouri 
State Colle_e in taking the affirmative position on this question, 
while the negative was upheld by President Walter H. Ryle of 
Northeast Missouri State Teachers College and President R. W. 
Fairchild of Illinois State Normal University. 

The two-day educational conference centers around the theme 
"Current Issues nnion^ Teachers Colleges." 

Dr. Eu ene R. Fair, dean of Southern's College of Education, 
and Raymond H. Dey, director of the Extension and Placement Services, 
also attended the second day's sessions. 



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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



10-21-46 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Release on receipt 



Carbondale, 111., Oct. 21 --Finding out the hard way that after 
touchdowns, conversions are important, too, the Southern Illinois 
Normal University Maroons went down to a 14-12 del eat at the hands 
of Arkansas State last Saturday as the Indians made two touchdowns 

I and two place kicks while the Maroons matched their two six-point 
scores but could not add the extra markers. 

Southern hit the jackpot when the game was young as Dick 
Seelman of Flora dropped a 30-yard pass into the arms of Leedio 
Cabutti of Johnston City who was standing in the end zone. The 
place-kick missed and the Maroons led 6-0. 

The Indians fought back in the third period, however, and 
counted twice. Their first score came after they had intercepted 
a Southern pass. They marched down the field to the Maroon two-yard 
line, from where Jim Jordan carried it over. Bob Appleby and Tom 
Uhlmansieck combined for the conversion, with Appleby booting, and 
the Staters led 7-6. 

The Maroons received the kickoff deep in their own territory 
and when quarterback Gene Stotlar of Pinckneyville dropped back to 
pass, he was rushed, and tossed the ball into the arms of Arkansas 
end S. T. Johnston, who Was downed on the local one yard line. 

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Trying three line plays th&t failed to gain the necessary 
yardage, Uhlmansieck passed to Virgil Ledbettur in t he end zone to 
chalk up another six points. Appleby and Uhlmansieck combined once 
more and the man from Jonesboro, Ark., had a commanding 14-6 lead. 

Coach Glenn ''Abe 5 ' Martin's charges weren't to be cast aside 
so easily though, and in the fourth period Bill Malinsky of Flora 
passed to George Beltz of Marion from a tricky formation on the 
26-yard line and Beltz received the toss in the Indian end zone. 
Once more the conversion failed and Arkansas still led 14-12. 

Time ran out before the Maroons could cross the goal line 
again but the contest ended on a thrilling note. With time left 
for but one play, Malinsky heaved a desparate pass from his own 
46-yard line and Beltz hauled it down on the State four-yard stripe. 
He was immediately tackled and the officials declared the contest 
p^s history. 

This was Southern's second loss against as many triumphs. The 

next home game will be November 2, when the Maroons will entertain 

Eastern Illinois State Teachers in the annual homecoming contest. 

Next week the Martin-men will journey to Macomb where the Western 

Leathernecks will try to derail the Maroon conference-crown drive. 

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l—— _ ,__ mmmmm Southern Illinois 

— — — — — — Normal University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■^■■■■HHHHBIHMHHII^^^^^^^M 



10-22-46 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Release Friday 



Carbondale, Iii., Oct. 25 --Vronsky and Babin, Russian two-piano 
team, will appear at Southern Illinois Normal University in Shryock 
Auditorium under the auspices of the Community Concert Association 
on November 6, Mrs. W. A. Thalman, Association chairman, has announced 

Vitka Vronsky was born in Kiev and was educated at the Kiev 
Conservatory. Babin was born in Moscow and entered the conservatory 
at Riga. The two met in Berlin as students of Artur Schnabel, 
pianist, and there decided to mer^e their lives and talents. Vitka 
Vronsky is Mrs. Babin as well as one member of the team. 

They made their American debut at Town Hall, New York, on 
February 14, 1937. Since then they have soloed with the New York 
Philharmonic, Philadelphia, Minneapolis, Pittsburgh, Hollywood Bowl, 
Chicago, and other orchestras. Each season they make a ' 
transcontinental tour in this country. Both are American citizens. 

Programs they have performed with as guest artists include 
the Ford Hour, Bing Crosby, Rudy Vallee, Andre Kostelanetz, and 
Hildegarde. 



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.____-___ Normal University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■^■^■■■■■■■■■■■^■■^■■■M 






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Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Release Friday 




Carbonaale, 111, , Oct. 25 --Two conference wins in a row is what 
the Southern Illinois Normal Maroons will be shooting for when they 
invade Macomb, Illinois, next Saturday to do battle with the 
Meotern Leathernecks. 

The Maroons h^.ve one Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference 
win in their books as they took the measure of the State Normal 
Kedbirds two weeks ago, 

Although the Maroons still arc plagued by the injury jinx, the 
Leathernecks should not offer too much trouble, despite the fact 
that they will be performing before a Homecoming crowd, as they 
have drooped two conference tilts already, 

Head Football Coach and Athletic Director Glenn "Abe ,: martin has 
announced his starting lineup ab follows: left end- Joe Franza of 
Murphysboro; left tackle- Jim Lovin of Benton; left ^uard-J, Pieion 
of murphysboro; center-Charlie Heinz of Gi~ies_ie; right tackle-. 
Charles Mathiew of ^Idorado; right guard-Bill Cosgrove of Benton; 
right end-Leedio Cabutti of Johnston City; quarterback-Bill Malinsky 
of Flora; left halfback-Dick Seelman of Flora; ripht halfback- 
Gene Stotlar of Pinckneyville \ fullback-Lawrence Calufetti of 
Johnston City. 

It is doubtful whether Jack Stephens of West Frankfort, Bob 
Etheridge of Fairfield, and Charles "Shag" Crouch of Carbondale 
will make the trip as they have been sidelined because of injuries, 
Martin said. 

One major change in the backfield shows Stotlar moved to a 
halfback position from his quarterback berth. This Wc.s done to 
capitalize on Stotlar T s prowess as a rum .inj back, Martin said. 

The Maroons have the season's record of two victories against 
as many defeats. The next home game will be the Homecoming affair 
against Eastern State Teachers on Novembei 2, 

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Normal University 



Information Service CABgoMDA "' 1LL "' ols 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■^■■B 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailie; 
Release Friday 



10-23-40 



Carbondale, 111., Oct. 25 — Dr. K. C. C as sell, chairman of the 

Department of Agriculture, and Conrad. White, assistant professor of 
Agriculture, recently visited the J. T. Allison 1 s Sons Shropshire 
Sheep Farm near Mattoon, Illinois t to purchase stock for the 
University farm. 

This is one of the oldest nationally known Shropshire sheep 
flocks in the United St tes. It was established in I8B9 and has won 
a number of prizes in county, state and national sheep shows. 

Two two-year-old ewes and one yearling were selected for the 
University flock. Two of these ewes are sired by a r^m from the 
George IlcKerrow flock of Wisconsin, ana one ewe is sired by a ram 
from the W. F. Renk flock of Wisconsin* Kenk and McKerrow are 
nationally known Shropshire breeders. These eweo should be an 
excellent addition to the small but w ooa flock of sheep maintained 
by the University farm. White pointed out. 

Tne purposes of .the snee, flock as well ao the other herds 
and flocks at the University farm are (1) for instruction in the 
livestock classes in the Department of Agriculture, (2) for 
experimental ana research work and, (3) to provide „oou breeding 
stock for the farmers and breeders of Southern Illinois. 

it 11 § 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. 25 —Mrs. Dorothea F. Swan, assistant 
■professor of art at Southern Illinois Normal University, has been 
^notified that the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts has acce ted a 
lithograph of hers, "'Birchrunville , '"' for the 44th Annual Philadelphia 
Water Color and Print Exhibition Oct. 19-Nov. 24. 

Mrs. Swan is also exhibiting two oil paintings, "Weeping Willow" 
ana ;; Lake James Chapel,' 1 at the 12th Local artists Exhibition at the 
Fort ,T ayne (Ind.) Art Museum, Nov. 10-Dec. 20. 

it if u 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 






Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



10-23-46 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Release Friday 



Carbondale, 111., Oct, 25 --Coach Leland ,; Doc" Lingle and his 
Southern Illinois Normal University cross-country tema will join 
the football squad when they invade Western Teachers at Macomb next 
Saturday, to perform in the Leathernecks homecoming affair. 

The Maroons have one win notched in their only start this season 
when they took the measure of Eastern State Teachers last Friday. 
Although two Eastern harriers finished in a dead heat for first place, 
the Southerners managed to rack up third to seventh place inclusively 
and also an eleventh spot to take the days honors. 

The winning time for the 3 : 45 mile course was 17:40. The 
thin-clads finished as follows: Slater and Sullivan of Eastern 
finished in a tie for first place; third (s) William Keene of 
Carrier Mills; fourth (s) Bob Lunneman of Pinckneyville; fifth (s) 
Glen Hamilton of Pinckneyville; sixth (s) Buddy Miller of Carbondale; 
seventh (s) Leonard Burden of Herrin; eight (E) kickman; ninth (E) 
Spiller; tenth (E) McCulloch; eleventh (s) Louis Pechineno of 
Christopher; twelveth (E) Hansen. 

The next home meet 'carded for the Maroons is set for November 
2 when the Maroons will meet the Easterners in a return go. 

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!_ 1 ^ mmmi mmm Ji^ mm m ^ mmmm Southern Illinois 

— — — — — Normal University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^■H^Hm^B^^HM^^^^^^H^^M 






ii)-- 5-Lh 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Release Monday 



Carbondale, 111., Oct. 28 --'"Our Museum, 1 ' monthly publication 
dedicated to a more complete understandin_ of Southern Illinois, made 
it3 initial appearance at Southern Illinois Normal University in 
September, under the direction of John W. Allen, curator of the 
University museum. 

The staff consists or Allen, curator of history arid the museum, 
and three students, Lorame '/aters of Percy, editor and artist; Doris 
Morgan of Sparta,, assistant artist; and Verne, Lee Shannon of Oraville 
assistant editor. 

a sketch of an old Korentha], Church adorns the cover of the 
booKlet, and inside is a story on the village of Kornthal, Valley 
of Grain, located two miles south of Jonesboro. 

a review of Otto kothard's book, The Outla ws of C^ve-in- Kock , 
description of the Museum's collection of Indian relics, gathered 
by Irving Peithman, manager of che University Farm; comments on 
the Grand Tower hock: and acknowled ements of gifts that have been 
made to the museum are included in the selection. 

It also contains a lecture called '"Toadstool or mushroom*' 
written bp Dr. Walter B.. \'elch, who last week became chairman of 
Southern's botany aepartment, upon retirement of the former chairman, 
Dr. T 7iliiam M. Bailey, professor of botany. 

if ; a 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. 2S --Twenty lithographs are on display 

in the Southern Illinois Normal University Art Center, mid are 

complemented in technical and estaetic phases by an exnibit in the 

Liotie Gallery, ben r ."atkins, assistant professor of art, has announced 

The prints are original, limited editions of the .,ork of sucn 
artists :-s ri.d'olph Dehn, George middle, Dorio Lee, Boardman hobinson, 
Edgar blmtton, ana hi nold Blanch, 

according to Vatkins, th»„ aiaiity of the \ ork is hrh and the 
subject matter is of popular interest. Exhibitions are usually chanpe 
every month and it is planned to offer a variety of shows for the 
coming snow. 

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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Release Monday 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



10-25-46 



Carbondale, III., Oct. 28 --Amid the hustle and bustle of campus 
Homecomirr: activity at Southern Illinois Normal University, none is 
more intent than that of the Athletic Director and Head Football 
Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin, his assistants, ana the football scuad. 

Aside from being a conference tilt, the game with Eastern to 
be held here November 2 will probably attract thousands of students, 
local fans, and many alumni, and the athletic department is doing 
their utmost to furnish them with an afternoon complete with the 
fruits of victory. 

However, Eastern will play the roll of villi an once more in their 
highly concentrated efforts to make the Maroon fans leave MacAndrew 
Stadium in an unhappy state of mind. Coach Maynard "Pat" O'Brien 
will be bringing an eleven to Carbondale that is sprinkled generously 
with returned veterans and high school stars. The Panther scuad is 
reported to be the largest to turn out in Eastern history. 

In the Southern mentor, Martin, is found a quiet character 
who oozes confidence and is able to impart this _uiet confidence 
to his men. Martin attended Southern and won football letters in 
1929, 1930, and 1931. In 1930 he was elected captain and was 
chosen all-conference left halfback. 

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Martin also played professional football for the Chicago 
Cardinals for one ye^r and then took up high school coaching. He 
started at Fairfield and then moved to Pontiac. He returned to 
3outhern T s campus in 1 J 3$ as assistant coach and in 1939 became 
hecid cocich. In 1945, he was made athletic Director. 

In eastern's case, however, T Brien is serving his freshman year 
as head football <und is anxious to make a jood record. He was 
recently released from the U. S. Navy with the rank of lieutenant 
commander. While in service, O'Brien had the r;ood fortune to work 
under the direction of Bernie Bierman, famous Minnesota mentor, who 
was directing the Iowa Pre-Flijht team. O'Brien attributes much of 
his football knowledge to this association. 

O'Brien, six feet three inches tall and weijhin w 225 pounds, 
is a former gridiron star of Illinois T 7esleyan of Bloominr:ton, and 
probably nothing would suit him better than to ^nock off Southern's 
Maroons before the Homecomin^ aggregation. 

However, with many of the injured Southerners on the recovery 
list, the Maroons should be able to field a full strength team 
a^ciinst Eastern, and a victory for the Maroon and White should not 
be too remote. 

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Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



10-29-46 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Release Thursday 






Carhondale. j -lK. Oct, ••--Here's a few words of advice for the throngs of 
Southern Illinois Normal University alumni "".ho are planning to attend the Nov c 
1-2 Homecoming at Southern; 

(!) Buy your tickets for the Homecoming Play,, the Sou uhern~ Eastern football 
game, and the Homecoming Dance in advance to avoid the rush, 

(2) If you're ^commuting 5 ' you might consider bringing a box lunch. 

(3) If you 'will be here oversight, and need assistance in finding rooms, 
Southern's housing counselor, Mrs, Mabel Pulliam in the Dean of "Women's Office, 
will be glad to help you. 

Advance sale tickets for he Homecoming Play w.'j.l end at noon Thursday, 
but tickets for the Homecoming Dance win be on a*?.le downtown in six business 
houser— Varsity, Kalgreun's and Cl'inc Vick Drug Stores, Tom Mofield ; s Clothing 
Store, ana Klauman's Studio— at Carter's Care in the University community, ond at 
the Alumni Offico on the campus Friday afternoon until 2 o'clock. 

Tickets? for the football game, both reculaf tickets and tax stubs for 

r 

complimentary tickets, wi?-.l be or. sale Friday afternoon at the Elite Barber Shop 
and on sale at the Stadium 'gate after .?-.C o'clock Saturday morning, 

Dae to the large student enrollment and to the anticipated record crowd 
fcr Homecoming, it is expected that the University Cafeteria and All restaurants 
of Carbondale one vicinity will he tarred for past oapa.city, so that thosfi' V.ho 
can conveniently bring box lunches are urged to do so. 

Mrs. Pulliam, University housing counselcr, reports that she has listings of 
numerous private rooms which will be available to overnight Homecoming guests, 

Homecoming will begin officially Friday morning at 10 a.m. when students 

will gather at the Stadium — Shryock Auditorium is far too small to accommodate 

today's 2.700 student body— for a pep session* President Chester F. Lay will 

dismiss classes for the day as soon as the assembly and pep session have ended. 

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, At 11 o'clock a giant parade of floats and stunts will leave the ca~mpus, 
headed by convertibles bearing the Queen nominees and attendants, for downtown, 
i/'vhen the procession reaches the parking area downtown, a second pep session 
will be held, and prizes will be awarded for the floats and stunts. 

Open house will be held at the President's Office from 2 to 4 Friday 

afternoon and eYom 10 to ]2 Saturday morning, although President Lay has 

< 
announced he hopes alumni will call at any tine it is convenient. 

Students will attend a fr^© movie in the afternoon and the i-ittle Theater 
will stage Its Homecoming production, "V' r u Can : t Taxe It With You", Friday night 
at ShryocJ: Auditorium. Curtain time- is b p.m* A poo rally for all students 
and all all mni will be held en the pi'acti.ce field immediately after the play. 

The women* s Athletic Association will sponsor its traditional 7arsity-Aluoai 
hockey game Saturday morning at £ a. -a. The Alumni Association wi? 1 hold its 
annual meeting a; - . 1C ^..m. at the .Roberts Hotel, 

Que on nominees and attendants will be entertained at n break.rfcs'a at 11:30 

> ' ■ : .... ■'■,-• ,i . \ . • 

by the Queen's committee, with Vi:-~ o-lor^a ^arsjer cl Earrisburg, last year's 
queen, as an honor guest. 

At 1 o'clock It Southern Illinois high school a.ici grade school bands will 
parade ir m downtown bo the stadi m. and will present a series of formations 
and masred band music during the half at the g:-.me , 

Features at the football gams, in addition to the school, bands, will include 
pre game presentation of the Queen nominees, and presentation jf the Henry 
Hinkley toward by Nu Epsilon Alpha to Care, Mlosevioh of 3eigler, ill -conference 
tackle en last year's c earn, and a stalwart on this year's line. 

This award hat, b^en established by the fraternity in memory of one of their 
former members ^ho lost his life %p the war, A plaque will, ue presented by the 
fraternity to President lay which will be placed in the Gymnasium and which 
will b^ar ,the names of successive, winners of /the award, 

Between, halves, at ■ _■„./ / jqnclus.ion of the massed band formation, members 
of the Southern Knights, campus service society which is currently reorganizing 
after wartime inactivity, will f05maj.lv present .the Sphinx, large model of the 
achocVs insignia, 

From 8 to 11 p.m. an informal reunion party for all alumni will be held 
in the Old Gymnasium,, whj.le the homecoming Tance will be held from 9 to 1 o'clock 
in the new Cv yn , na p i urn ., 

Music for the dance will be furnished, by Johnny '-Scat" Davis and his 16-piece 
o relies «r a . 



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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINO 



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The climax of' Homecomi ng will occur at 11 p.m» when the dance will be 
Interrupted <for the crowning of Southerr's 1946 Queen by Football Team Captain 
Bill Malinsky of Flora, Master of ceremonies for this event, as well as for 
the Friday, right pep rally and the ceremonies at the game, will be student 
chairman of Homecoming, Dale Andrews of Lt. Cirmol. 

Who th c queen will be is a closely guarded secret, although sh« was 
elected by ;hc student bedw a v/eek ago. Ballots have been under lock and key, 
ana her identity will no; be revealed until the moxL3-.it of her coronation. 

Queen nominees r i y r- Jiathryn Alley of Carbondale, Joan Fairbairn of Harvey, 
Aliene Kauziarich oi Chris soppier, Barbara i^ivin of, buQuoin. una Velma McConaich 
of Jdhi s ton Citv. Qu ten's attendants will be Elizabeth Bonner of Fairfio?c and 
Dorothea Gahan of tl ^'a, . 

The football o-am* 5 wUI he broadcast ever Radio Station WJPF; which will 

also broadcast a half- hour program Saturday nidit, from 10?45 t;o 11*15 p.m., 

including . a-.txjb music and the Queen'; ?oroi ation. 

Among the honor guests for the 1945 £ome"soming will be Frank G. Thompson, 
director of the State Department o^ r ^egi (>traticn and Education and chairman of 

the State Teachers College joi.d who is himself j.n alumnus of Southern,, and 

Br. ^ercival Bailey oi Chicago, pr.esideni of the Sou hern Alumni Association. 

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^ 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Release Friday p.m. 



10-30-46 



Carbon da 1. r 111., Nov. 1 — Homecoming got under way today at 

Southern Illinois Normal University at students met in a giant 

oep rally in MacAndrew Stadium, staged a parade of bands and floats 

to the heart of downtown Carbondale, and there held another pep 

session. 

Aliunni are alread; T piling in for the two- day celebration, and 

other thousands are expected for the Southern-Eastern football game 

tomorrow and the homecoming dance and Queen's coronation tomorrow 

night. 

A record-breaking crowd is anticipated at the football game, and 

bleachers have been erected to provide a total seating capacity at 

the Stadium of some 8,500. 

Similarly, the dance space has been enlarged at the Gymnasium for 

the Homecoming ball on Saturday night, when Johnny "Scat" Davis 

snd his orchestra will play, and Southern's Queen will be crowned. 

Tonight the Homecoming crowd will be regaled, by the Little 

Theater's production of* "You Can't Take It With You," followed by 

a huge bonfire and pep rally, at which freshmen will take the 

Fphcbic Oath, Southern pledge of loyalty, and cast their freshman 

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green ribbons into the flames. 

Chief speaker at the bonfire rally will be Dr. Percival Bailey 

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of Chicago, president of Southern's Alumni Association, while 

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Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin will speak briefly about prospects for iihiia 

Saturday's game. University President Chester F. Lay will 

administer the Ephebic Oath to the freshman. 

Nineteen Southern Illinois high school and grade school bands 
will stage a parade from downtown Carbondale to the stadium, beginning 
at 1 o'clock, and-will present a massed band concert and formations 
during the half. 

Both the football game and a half-hour' s program f jrom the 
Gymnasium, 10:45 to 11:15 p.m., including the Queen's coronation, 

will be broadcast over Station V/JPF, Hcrrin. 

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^^^_^^^^^^^^^^^ Southern Illinois 

__■__„,_ Normal University 

Information Service oahbo»dau, ill,»ois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. OnaHHBBBiHBHMBBHaHMBKBHBBBBBBHHi 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Release Friday p.m. 









Carbondale, 111,, Oct. "Beat Eastern on Homecoming" — -that is the cry that 
is going around the campus of Southern Illinois Normal University this week as 
the Southern Maroons are making last minute preparations to down the Eastern 
Illinois State Teachers College eleven when they clash in MacAndrew Stadium at 
2:30 p.m. next Saturday, November 2, 

The Maroons sport a record of three wins ana two defeats for the current 
season, and two of these victories were over Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic 
conference foes; therefore, the Maroons will lay their chances to stay in the race 
for the loop crown on the line in this crucial contest. 

The Maroon grid machine should be ready to go in this tilt, as they came 
through last week's 1S-7 win over Western State Teachers without any serious 
injuries. Southern spoiled Western's Homecoming as far as the gridiron activities 
were concerned, and will be out this week to keep Eastern from returning the 
deed to them. 

Eastern should not be too difficult for the Maroons to solve this week, as 
Southern is rated a better squad by the experts, and on top of this will be 
especially keyed up for Homecoming* However, it is a known fact that rival 
coaches and teams have no greater joy than to whip a favore-do. team in its 
Homecoming game. 

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For this game, Southern Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin will senc the following 
team out to defend the Maroon and Vilhitei left end--Galan Da vis of DuQuoinj left 
tackle — Jim Lovin of Benton; left guard — Drm Osborn of Jackson City, Mich.; cneter- 
Charlie Heinz of Gillespie; right guard — Bill Cosgrove of Benton; right tackle — 
Sam Milosevich of Zeigler; right end — Leedio Cabutti of Johnston City; quarterback- 
Bill Malinsky of Flora; left halfback--Bob Johnson of Royalton; right halfback — 
Gene Stotlar of Pinckneyville; fullback— ^Lawrence Calufetti of Johnston City. 

Eastern will probably look like this as they take the field; ends — Lt Cox 
and Miller; Bujnowski and &aytonj guards--Davisson and Jackson; center--Ingram; 
halfback — Stabler and McDermott; fullback — Gross; quarterback — Babb. 

Southern will be playing under a new team captain as members of the squad 
have elected Bill Malinsky of Flora as head of the 1946 aggregation. 

Tickets for the contest will go on sale at 10 a.m. Saturday in front of 
MacAndrew Stadium, the business office has announced, A capacity crowd is 
expected,' if the weatherman is on Southern's side, and extra bleachers have been 
erected to facilitate seating difficulties. This contest will be broadcast over 
Station WJPF, whose headquarters are in Herrin, 111. 

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Information Service 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. All past and present members 
of the "I" Club, letter athletics' organization at Southern 

Illinois Normal University, should register at MacAndrew 

Gymnasium next Saturday, November 2, before or after the foot- 
ball game, Athletic Director and Head Football Coach Glenn "Abe" 
Martin has announced, The athletic department desires the name, 
address, and occupation of the members, 

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Carbondale, 111,, Oct. -Over 100 men have reported for 
basketball practice to Assistant Coach Lynn Holder at Southern 
Illinois Normal University, the athletic department has announced. 

This group does not include six men who were on the first 
ten last season who are playing football. They are: Gene Stotlar 
of Pinckneyville, winner of the Chuck Taylor award at Kansas City 
last year and also named all-conference quarterback; Sam 
Milosevich of Zeigler, named all-conference tackle last year; 
Quentin Stinson of .Eldorado, another all-conference star last 
year; Leedio Cabutti of Johnston City; Bill Malinsky of Flora; 
Carl Birkner of Pinckneyville . 

The Maroons open the season on November 30 when they 
entertain the semi-pro Onized Glass cagers of Alton. 







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^^ ^^^^^_^^^^^^^_ Southern Illinois 

______ Normal University 

Information Service CARBONDALB - ««woib 

lorena drummond. ed. tammmmMBStmaammKamammmmamessammeemm 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 

Carbondale. Ill,, Nov, -M.ieteon Southern Illinois 
school bands wil] play a prominent part in Southern Illinois 
Normal University's Homecoming, Nov. 1-2, reports Dr. Maurits 
Kesnar. ch airmail of the music department i 

The bands will convene Saturday morning at JViac Andrew Stadium 
to practice the format 1 bfts and music" they will present on 'che 
field between halves of the Southern-Eastern football game that 
afternoon. The bands will parade from downtown to the stadium at 1 p 

A bandmasters' luncheon will be hell at the cafeteria at 
12:30 p. m. for which President Chester f. Lay and other guesta nnn 
are scheduled go speak. 

"The luncheon is being given in appreciation for the great 
work the bandmasters have done in Southern Illinois,' 7 Dr. Kesnar 
explained. 

Following is a list of the Southern Illinois bands to be 
present: McLeansboro, Belleville, West Frankfort, Mounds, 
Johnston Cityj Dongola. DuQuoin, Herrin, Murphysboro, Sesser, 
Christopher, Zeigler, Carterville, Carbondale Community high school.- 



Grade school bands from arboiidale , Dcnfrola, Christopher and 
Carterville wiil else iaa participate £ 



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Information Service 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 






Special to Dailies 

Carbondale, 111,, Nov, -With the Illinois Intercollegiate 
Athletic Conference crown and the National Intercollegiate title to 
defend, the Southern Illinois Normal University cagers have begun to 
practice in earnest, Athletic Director and head Basketball Coach 
Glenn "Abe" Martin has announced. 

The Maroons open the season with a tilt here on November 30 
against Onized Glass and Shefford Cheese of Alton. Highlights of the 
25 game schedule are contests slated against Washington University, 
St. Louis University, two games with the University of Chicago and 
Indiana State, besides the regular conference play. 

In addition to the regular schedule, Southern will take part in 
a Christmas holiday tournament in Kansas City, and return to the same 
city to defend their N.I.T. crown in March, 

Injuries have made the race for the first ton positions a wide 
open affair. Only two members of last year's first five, Gene Stotlar 
of Pinckneyville and Leedio Cabutti of Johnston City, are out for 
practice, Quentin Stinson of Eldorado, first string center, will 
probably be sidelined until after the first of the year with a foot 
injury, while Sam Milos-evich of Zeigler, a starting guart , is 
hampered by a leg injury suffered in the Northern-Southern football gane. 

Seven lettermen of previous years have swelled the practice squad. 
They are Gene Hall of Galatia; Paul Enrietta of West Frankfort; Bill 
Millspaugh of Norris City; Barney Genisio of Valier; and Ed Alms of 
Percy, 



1946 SCHEDULE 

Onized Glass and Shefford Cheese Here 

Meramac Caverns Here 

St. Louis University There 

Washington University There 

Western Kentucky There 

Loyola University There 

Arkansas State Here 

Indiana State Here 



Nov. 


30 


Dec. 


3 




6 




7 




9 




14 




IS 




20 



(more) 







Jan. 7 Evansville College Here 

11 Western Illinois State Teachers Here 

14 Southeastern Missouri State Here 

16 Evansville College There 

1$ Eastern Illinois State Teachers Here 

20 Milliken University Here 
25 Northern Illinois State Teachers Here 
29 Southeastern Missouri State There 

Feb, 1 Illinois State Normal University There 

5 Chicago University Here 

$ Indiana State There 

14 Western Illinois State Teachers There 

15 Milliken University There 

21 Eastern Illinois State Teachers There 

22 Chicago University There 
24 Illinois State Normal University Here 

Mar. 1 Northern Illinois State Teachers There 



Invitational tournament at Kansas City, December 27, 28 

National Intercollegiate Basketball Tournament at Kansas 
City, March 15 



hi 



Carbondale, 111., Nov. --Glenn ''Abe" Martin, athletic director 

at Southern Illinois Normal University, 
and football coach /isn't getting much rest even though the football 

season is over, for he is in almost nightly demand as a guest speaker 

at football banquets. 

Martin spoke Monday night at a banquet at Hbopston in honor of 

oopston's coach, Glenn Brqsel, former Southern Maroon football captain, 

and on Thursday night at a dinner sponsored by the Zeigler Rotary Club 

n honor of the Zeigler team. 

In between, he made a trip to Springfield to address the newly 

organized Springfield Southern Alumni Club, on Tuesday evening. 



# 



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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 

Carbondale, 111., Nov. - Two Southern Illinois Normal University 
faculty members Thursday attended a meeting in Chicago of a new sub- 
committee on scholarships of the American Association of Teachers 
Colleges. 

Dr. Eugene R. Fair, dean of Southern's College of Education, is a 
member of the three-member committee. Accompanying him to the meeting 
was Jerry Allen of Carbondale, critic teacher at Buncombe S c hool and 
graduate student, who is doing a research project here on scholarship 
and is working with the committee on its investigations. 

Other members of the committee are President Anspach of Central 
Michigan College of Education and President Haggerty of the teachers 
college at Newpaltz, N. Y. 

# # # 

Carbondale, 111., Nov. - Miss Helen Shuman, dean of women at 
Southern Illinois Normal University, and Miss Minette Barber, director 
of Anthony Hall, girls' dormitory, attended the meeting of the State 
nssoci^tion of Deans of Women in Peoria Thursday and Friday of this week 

f if it 



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______ Normal University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. HBIMHmB^B^BBHBHBBHBBBimBHMBBBi 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111., Nov. - Jim Lovin, a freshman veteran from 
Benton, was elected "the most valuable player" on this year's 
Southern Illinois Normal University gridiron squad by his teammates, 
Athletic Director Glenn ("Abe") Martin has announced. Loving/will 
now compete with the "most valuable players" from the other 
Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference schools for the 
William McAndrew Award, which is made annually in memory of 
Southern's former coach. 

Sports letters will be awarded to 27 gridders and seven cross- 
country men, the athletic department has also announced. 

Men to receive football letters are: George Boltz of Marion; 
Leedio Cabutti of Johnston City; Lawrence Calufetti of Johnston 
City; John Catlin of Harrisburg; Bob Colborn of! Flora; Bill Cosgrove 
of Benton; Don Creath of Dupo; Charles "Shag" Crouch of Carbondale; 
Galan Davis of DuQuoin; Bob Etheridge of Fairfield; Joe Franza 
of Murphysboro; Jim Lovin of Benton; Charlie Heinz of Gillespie; 
Bob Johnson of DuQuoin; Bill Malinsky of Flora; Charles Mathiew of 
Eldorado; Orm Osborn of Jackson City, Mich.; J. Pieron of 
Murphysboro; Roy Ragsdale of DeSoto; Don Riggs of Fairfield; John 
Ruzich of Johnston City; Myron Schuster of Murphysboro; Dick Seelman 
of Flora; Jack Stephens' of W. Frankfort; Gene Stotlar of Pinckneyville; 
and Bill Thompson of Mt . Vernon. 

The harriers, who were entertained by Cross-Countyy Coach Leland 
P. "Doc" Lingle at his home last Thursday, will receive their 
initial letters in this sport as this is the first season that any 
of them have run cross-country at Southern. 

The thinclads v/ho will receive letters are: Leonard Burden of 

Herrin; Bill Dorris of Benton; Glen Hamilton of Pinckneyville; 

William Keene of Carrier Mills; Bob Lunneman of Pinckneyville; 

Buddy Miller of Carbondale; Marion Hall of Thompsonville. 

The gridders wound up the current season with four wins against 
p,a many defeats and second place in the final ].oop standings, while 
^o"M^ri»rg a ^?niS^e*^tfca : s0^§^ Mt£ I^wg Vvi&s sfctf 5 §£4* *§m &Ms 
£.-apk, aeeond p^ace £n fc*»* conference race. 



I! 






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______ ___ _ ^^ mm Southern Illinois 

i Normal University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

lorena drummond, ed. MgaBBmaammmmaamsmmaBminaMsmsEBni 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 

Carbondale, 111., Nov. - Four nw/ student members were 
appointed this week to the Student Publications Council at Southern 
Illinois Normal University by Dick Avis of Johnston City, president 
of the Student Council. 

These four are Gerald Carr of East St. Louis, freshman 
representative; Martha McBrayer of Benton, sophomore representative; 
Fred Armstrong of DuQuoin and Dave Kenney of Carbondale, senior 
representatives. 

Helen Mary Robertson of Vienna, who served as sophomore 
representative last year, will continue as junior representative 
this year. 

The Student Publications Council, composed of five students and 
three faculty members, the latter appointed by the University 
President, is the governing board for all student publications, and 
has charge of electing editors and declaring policies. 

Dr. Harold Briggs, professor of history, has been appointed by 
University President Chester F. Lay as a new faculty representative, 
while Miss Susie Ogden, assistant professor of commerce, and Miss 
Lorena Drummond, director of the Information Service, were reappointed. 

At its initial meeting this week, the council authorized calling 

to the attention of the editor of The Egyptian , student newspaper, 

regulations adopted by the council last year (a) that all editorials, 

letters from readers, or articles expressing the writer's opinion 

must be signed, at least by initials with the full name of the writer 

available to any person requesting the information, and (b) that any ■ 

editorial, letter from reader or other article criticizing any person, 

persons or group may not be published without first giving the person, 

persons or group an opportunity to reply or make a statement in the 

same issue of the paper. 

The council also voted to suggest to the editor that space be 

made available in each issue for official announcements or statements 

from the faculty or administration. 

ji i, 



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Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■I 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 






Carbondale, 111,, Nov. - Sam Milosevich of Zeigler and 
^Uantin Stinson of Eldorado, first string members of Southern Illinois 
Normal University's cage squad, have been temporarily sidelined by 
football injuries, Athletic Director and Head Basket Ball Boach 
Glenn "Abe" Martin has announced, 

Milosevich was injured in the final grid game of the season 

as the Northern Teachers downed Southern 10-0 to capture the 

conference grid crown. 

practice 
Stinson was injured in a mid-season/session and will probably 

he out until after the first of the year. 

Only two members of last year's starting quintet are on hand for 
the pre-season practice, while the other starter, Calvin Collins, is 
managing a grocery at DuQuoin. The two lettermen from last year's 
starting string, Gene Stotlar of Pinckneyville and Leedio Cabutti 
of Johnston City, will be hard put to keep their old spots as Martin 
has many former lettermen and freshmen to choose from. 

The Maroons won the Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference 
title in basket ball last year, then went on to Kansas City to win 
the National Intercollegiate Tournament there, in which Stotlar 
carried off the Chuck Taylor Award as the most valuable player in 
the tournament. They open play here Nov. 30 again Onized Glass, ' 



Hi 



ed 






Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■■■■■■■■■■■IIMMiMBBBBBBBBi 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 

Carbondale, 111,, Nov, - Dr. Chester F. Lay, president of 
Southern Illinois Normal University,, has been appointed as a member 
of the committee on education of Governor Dwight H. Green's 
Highway Traffic Safety Commission. 

The commission, of which Gen# William E. Guthner is executive 
secretary, is composed of four principal committees: engineering, 
education, enforcement, and legislation. 

Paul Hill, Chicago, of the National Safety Council is chairman 
of the committee on education. 

An all -day conference on Highway Traffic Safety will be held 
by the commission in Springfield Dec. 12. Dr. Lay plans to attend 
the session. 

### 



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:Cy 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Special to Dailies and Weeklies 



Carbondale, 111., Nov. — a total df 65,511 cataloged items 
reside in Southern Illinois Normal University's Wheeler library, Ur. 
Howard Li. Bosley, associate professor of education and director of 
the library, states. 

There are 4S,742 books, 5,340 documents, and 11,429 bound volumes 
of magazines. In addition to these, several thousand government 
documents and other research materials housed are available.. The 
library receives 655 magazines. 

Southern has a book collection of high quality and value, according 
to the North Central Association accrediting organization, says Dr. 
Bosley. In the association's latest checklist, the quality of Southern'! 
book collection is surpassed by only seven per cent of 127 bachelor 
decree granting institutions, and less than 20 per cent. of the master 
degree granting institutions in the 14 states of the association. 

Five newspapers are received on microfilm. A recordak microfilm 
reader, ordered for post-war delivery, arrived in August and is now in 
■e, 

Two thousand aeronautical and hydro._raphical charts will be 
deposited here through the Library of Congress from the aeronautical 
chart service and the hydrographic office of the U. 3. army. 

Southern's library was also selected by the army map service to 
receive 50,000 maps, five shipments of which already have arrived. 

(a notable acquisition of the past year has been the purchase of 
00 doctor's dissertations from Teachers College, Columbia University. 

-'/- 4 M 
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M _^__ Hi _^^_ i __ i ^_ iB Southern Illinois 

____■_«____ Normal University 

Information Service CARBONDALE ' ILL1NOIS 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■■^■■■■^■■■■■■■^■i 









u 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies and Weeklies 

Carbondale, 111., Nov. -Southern Illinois Normal University 
will close Thursday, Friday and Saturday, Nov. 28-30, for a Thanks- 
giving recess j the Presidents Office has announced* 

Classes will be dismissed at the close of the day on Wednesday, 
and University offices will be closed Thursday, Friday and Saturday. 

M 

Carbondale, 111., Nov. -Ruth Sprankel of Waterloo has received 
the $200 PTA scholarship given annually to a Southern Illinois Normal 
University sophomore, Miss Vera Peacock, chairman of the local 
committee on scholarships, standards, and honors at Southern, has 
announced. 

The scholarship is awarded by the Illinois Congress of Parents 
and Teachers to a University student who was graduated from an 
accredited high school with a Parent Teacher Association in membership 
with the Illinois Congress. 

Other requirements are high scholastic standing, sterling 
character, and good health. Miss Sprankel ! s scholastic average is 
4»93 out of a possible 5.0 points. 

Her activities include membership in the University band and 
the Independent Student Union, She is employed in Wheeler library. 







Jl 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CA,BOKDAIE ' IlUNOIS 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■ "^^^™ ■■ ■ ■■■■■■^^■■■■■■■i 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies and Weeklies 

Carbondale, 111., Nov. -After five years of operation, the 
United States airway weather station of Southern Illinois Normal 
University has received the rating of "secretarial station," Dr. 
Thomas F. Barton, chairman of the geography department and supervisor 
of the station, announces . 

The advancement came as a result of efficient operation and fine 
records by student weather observers, Dr. Barton explained. Establishes 
in 1941, the station is a cooperative undertaking of the University 
geography and geology department and the United States Weather Bureau. 

At the present time four student weather observers take readings. 
They are James McGee, Granite City; Edwin Becht, Chicago; Alice Vravick. 
West Frankfort; and Loren Boatman, Carlinville. 

Most of the students who have received training in the past have 
pursued the subject after leaving Southern. In the order in which 
thoy were trained, and the subsequent positions they have held, these 
students are as follows: 

Harry Chester, Anna, meteorologist in the armed forces four years, 
is employed by the weather bureau at Peoria, James Chandler, Carbondal- 
served as a meteorologist in the Alaska theatre. Ed Barrett, West 

(more) 









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2 
Frankfort) served as a meteorologist in the armed forces. Charles 
Turner, Eldorado, was graduated from the Institute of Meteorology at 
the University of Chicago. 

Joseph Prelec, Jr., Stanton, received a United States Weather 
Bureau scholarship, was graduated from the Institute of Meteorology at 
the University of Chicago, and worked for the weather bureau at the 
Chicago airport station. In April, 1946, he was transferred to the 
Atlantic ocean weather patrol base at Boston, where he has done 
additional studying, and where he is getting weather reading experience, 

Other students with only a few months' service in the station who 
were called to the armed forces were Silas Jerome Gates of DeSoro, Lore] 
Boatman, who has been reappointed, Elmer Adams of Dongola, Eugene Wells 
of Salem, and Joseph Restivo of Horrin. 

Wells received an appointment to Lakehurst where he studied 
aerology and became a naval weather reporter. 

Restivo first went to Northwestern University, then secured an 
appointment to the Institute of Meteorology at the Boston Institute of 
Technology. He was graduated from there in the summer of 1946. At 
sea, he is getting naval experience in meteorology. 

i Jamie McGee of Granite City, twin brother of James McGee, was 
graduated in August, 1946, and is teaching at Granite City. William 
Reed of Karnak took readings during the summer of 1944. Louis 
McCullen owns and operates serveral plants at Cairo. 

Dr. Clarence Vinge, a new member of the geography and g eology 
[•department, will become operator of the station in December. 

.u n ii 



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f ■ 



I 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Release on recei -t 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



11-4-46 



Carbondale, 111., Nov. % — Gene Stotlar, diminutive quarterback 

of Pinckneyviile , sparked the ooutnern Illinois Normal University 
gridders to their third strai ht Ininois Iiit-^i "collegiate athletic 
Conference win today over the Eastern Illinois State Teachers 29-0, 
on a rain-drenched field before a large Homecoming crowd. 

Stotlar opened the festivities early in the first period when 
he scouted 75 yards down the sidelines for six points. Bret 
McGihnis of Carbondale kicked the extra point. 

Another 6 points were added by Stotlar in the second quarter 
when he took a short pass fron Bill Malinsky of Flora on the 3.5--yard 
line and turned on the speed to the end zone. 

Just before the half, Myron Schuster of Murphysboro blocked an 
Eastern kick in the Panthers end zone for a safety, and at the half, 
the Southern Maroons lea 15-0. 

In the third perioda 'Don Ri^gs of Fairfield climaxed a O oal 
drive for Southern by plunging 10 yards for paydirt. McGinnis 
converted a^ain ana t?he score was 22-0. 

The final Maroon score came in the fourth . eriod 'when Charles 
ilathiev; of Eldorado blocked cx-a Eastern punt in the end zone and 
tnen fell on the fall. McGinnis converted once more, ana Southern 
had 29 points when the ^ame ended. 

The Southern Maroons will journey to Evansville next week for 
a tilt with Evansville College, ana will entertain Northern Teachers 
on November 16 in the final game of the season. 






Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



&m 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 

Release on recei t 



11-4-46 













Carbondale, 111., Nov. — Aliene Kauzlurich of Christopher, ., 
was crowned .ueen of Southern at Southern Illinois Normal ■.•,-•. .rr:~ 
University's Homecoming dance here Saturday night. 

Wearing the crimson robe 01 royalty, she ascended a throne 
erected on the bandstand in the Maroon gymnasium, a nd the crown 
was placed on her head. by Football Captain Bill i-L.linsky- 

Lawrence Calufetti of Johnston City handed her the scepter. 
Crown and scepter were carried by little Miss Johanna Van Lente 

4 

and kaster Wallace Puiliam. 

Preceding the queen in the coronation • rocession were v ueen 
Nominees Kathryn Alley of Sparta, Joan Fairbair'n 01 Harvey, Velma 
McCormicfc of Johnston City, and Barbara lielvin of DuCjJioin* The 
pieen's attendants were two _irls repr . sentin_ the freshman and 
sophomore classes, Dorothea Gahan of Flora and Elizabeth Bonner of 
Fairfield . 

This year's Homecoming drew one of the largest crowds in 
Southern's history, despite rainy weather, a capacity crowd 
attended the Little Theater play EriHayda|,ght , some si:, or seven 
thousand spectators ^ iled into the stadium for the football game, 
though the crowd later thinned out when ram began to drench the 
stands, and a edacity crowd thronged the gymnasium for the dance 
Saturday night, 

The reunion of Southern alumni was directed by a large 
Homecoming committee headeo b- D^le Andrews oi kt. Carmel, student 
chairman, ana Dr. Orville Alexander, director of alumni services, 
who served as faculty sponsor for Homecoming. 

«. ., a 



I 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 




11-4-46 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Release on receipt 



Carbondaie, 111., Nov. --Throughout th^s week students and 
faculty of Southern Illinois Normal University here are participating 
in a Religious Emphasis Week under the leadership of several ...■ li 
nationally-known religious leaders. 

Starting Sunday morning with special services at several 
Carbondale churches in which Religious Emphasis V.'eek leaders 
occu_ ied the pulpits, the program enbraces daily breakfast sessions, 
class lectures, prayer services, seminars, faculty luncheons, and 
evening convocations f as well as discussion ^roups at organized 
student houses. 

Speaker at the Sunday evening convocation v/ s the Rev. Bayard 
Clark, minister at Gape Girardeau, i.o. 

Other leaders here for this i eek, which is s onsored bv the 

/ urn 

University Christian Missions of the Federal Council of Churches, 
include Cl^rk Ellsey, specialist in marriage ana family relations 
and professor of Stephens College; Dr. James Nichols, co-editor 
of The Journal of Religion ana University of Chicago professor of 
Christianity; Mrs. Anna Mow, former missionary to India, now 
professor of Christian education at Bethany Seminary in Chicago; 
and Dr. B. Frank Hail, lecturer on international affairs. 

Dr. Hail was the speaker at the University*s student assembly 
Tuesday morning at 10 a.m. 

a special radio broadcast fe ..taring the Religious Education 
I'Jeek leaders has oeen arranged over station V/JPF for Thursday 
afternoon fro:,. 2:30 to 3 o'clock. 

if 






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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Special tohSouthern Illinois Dailies 
Release on receipt 



11-5-46 






Carbondale, 111., Nov. — Despite the stormy weather that caused 
cancellation of the parade and be twe en-halves massed formation of 
gome 19 Southern Illinois hi^h and grade school bands hert last 
Saturday at Southern Illinois Normal University 1 s Homecoming, the 
bandmasters of this area were guests of the university for a 
bandmasters' luncheon at the University cafeteria, Dr. Kaurits 
Kesnar, music department chairman, reports. 

,;TT e were all keenly disappointed that the parade and concert 
had to be coaled off, '" Dr. Kesnar said, ''but we were delighted to 
have the bandmasters here. ,? :i 

The luncheon, arranged by Dr. Kesnar, was held in honor of two 
band directors •h\ r ho have uone so much for the- advancement of music 
in Southern Illinois, '" he said. These hoiaorees were Theodore 
Pascheda?j of West Frankfort and /i. T. atwood o_ DuC^uoin. 

Speakers at the luncheon, were University President Chester F. 
Lay, Deans T. \ T . nbbott, E. R. Fair ana Henry J. Rehn, ana Dr. 
Kesnar. 



I 



Carbondale, III., Nov, --Rehearsals arc now going forward at 

of the oratorio ,,f The Messiah 1 ' 
Southern Illinois Normal University for a presentation/b; a 300-voice 

choir and a 60-p.iece orchestra under the direction of Dr. maurits 

Kesnar, University professor of music, on December 15. 

Sinpers from many communities of Southern Illinois have joined 
the choir and are attending regular rehearsals. The University 
orchestra, augmented by a few outstanding instrumentalists from 
nearby communities, is also rehearsing regularly. 

To sing the leadin^ roles several noted soloists will be engaged, 
Dr. Kesnar said. 



^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 






Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE. ILLINOIS 



■■:. 11-5-46 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Release Thursday p.m. 



Carbondale 3 111., Nov. --Properties for Southern Illinois 
Normal University's expansion program have been purchased or placed 
under option for a total of 1429,750, University Business Manager 
Edward V. Miles, Jr., reports. 

Miles, designated to negotiate for land acquisition to provide 
sites for Southern's 25-year expansion program, has reported to 
Frank G. Thompson, director of the State Department of Registration 
and Education and chairman of the Teachers College Board, and to 
University President Chester F. Lay, that he has completed purchases 
and options on 25 tracts of improved property, one business house, 
one farm house, 11 vacant lots, and 175 acres. 

The University has a total appropriation of ^737,500 for the 
purchase of land during the current biennium, Mr. Miles explained. 

Other properities will continue to be purchased to complete 
sites for buildings soon to be built, for closing U. S. Highway 51 
through the campus, for closing Harwood .avenue south of the campus 
and for construction of tunnels from the proposed new power plant 
to the main campus, for extension of Illinois Avenue south through 
the campus, and for the proposed Library site. 



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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



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Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Special to Southern Illinois rallies 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



~. dl-6-46 






Carbondale, 111,, Nov. --Going outside the txiinois intercoli 
Intercollegiate Atnletic Conference next Saturday, the Southern 
Illinois Normal University ^ridders journey eastward to Evansville, 
Ind., to take on tht. highly touted Evansville College eleven in 
what promises to be one of the karoons 1 toughest battles of the 
season. 

This tilt will be somewhat of a ''rubber"' match as the two 
schojls hav. met twice before and each came off with a victory. In 
1940, the Aces downed Southern 13-7, but the jbiaroons came back in 
1941 to blank the Hoosiers 14-0, Football was discontinued at 
Evansville in 1943 so this wil- be the first meeting for the two 
teams since then. 

The Maroons arc riding on the crest of a two-game winning streak, 
having downed Uestern 19-7 and Eastern 29-0 on the last two 
successive Saturdays bringing Coach Glenn If iibe' ( Martin's charges 1 
record to four wins and two defeats, Martin has reported one injury 
from last weeks tilt, Lawrence Calufetti of Johnston City starting 
fullback, will not be in there for the opening kictvofi this week 
us he turned up with a leg injury after last Saturday's fray. 

The Evansville Aces are reported to have a powerful aggregation 
this year. Highlights from their record show a 20-0 win over 
Murray College, a 19-6 victory :>ver Illinois esle.an, a 13-2 edge 
over Indiana State, ana a scoreless tie with Cape Girardeau, the 
eleven that dropped Southern 13-7 earlier in the season, 

Martin has offered the following probable starting lineup: 
left end-Galan Davis of Du„uoin; left tackle- Jim Lovin or Benton; 
left guard- Oral Osborn of Jackson City, Lich.; center- Chafclie Heinz 
of Grilles )ie: right _uaru- Bill Cosgrove of Benton: right tackle- 
a^-iii I-iilosevich of aeigier; ri^nt end- Leeuio Cabutti of Johnston 
City; quarterback- Bixl Malinsky 01 Flora; lef-t ho.lxba.ck- sob 

Johnson ol Du.uo.ui; ri^iit halfback- Gene Gtotlar 01 I mckneyville; 

[more) 

fullback 



-2- 

f a±lback-c-Jonn Ruzicn of Johnston City. 

The Maroons next home game will be on November 16, when they 
entertain Northern Teachers in a contest that will probably decide 
the I.I.a.C. race. This tilt will close Southern's 1946 grid season. 

i $ i 



Carbondale, 111., Nov. --The Maroon Reserves dropped a hea 
heartbreaking 7-6 decision to Southeastern Missouri State ICMesday 
afternoon when their try for the extra point after touchdown hit the 
crossbar of the goal post and bounced away. 

The Southern ft B" team counted first as Roy Ra sdale of DeSoto 
completed a 20 yard p^.ss to George Beltz of Marion. Then, as the 
Maroons tried to convert, Bret McGinuis of Carbondale booted the 
pigskin just a bit too low ana it hit the crossbar. 

The Indians pulled tne game out of the fire in the last five 
minutes of : -lay as they intercepted a Southern pass, and ran to 
paydirt in the next four trys. Their conversion was O ood and the 
Maroons ''redhots'' dropped their second straight contest of the 
season. 

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Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CARBONDALE - Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. MBHBHMBi 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies and Weeklies 
Release on receipt 

Carbondale, 111., Nov. 6 - The administration of Southern 1211:.. 
Illinois Normal University welcomes "and indeed urges" an inquiry 
by the State Teachers College Board into University operations and 
achievements, University President Chester F. Lay said Wednesday. 

"I am confident," Dr. Lay declared, "that such an inquiry, far 
from giving substance to the irresponsible and often malicious 
rumors that have been circulating about the University and its 
administration, will prove conclusively that we have every reason 
to be proud--and that the people of Southern Illinois have equal 
reason to be proud — of our accomplishments here." 

The University president said that he understands that the 
directors of the University Alumni Association last week-end sent 
a resolution to the State Teachers College Board asking that board 
to inquire into the causes of the "unfavorable publicity" of recent 
weeks. 

"I am entirely in accord with this reported action of the 
Alumni Association directors," Dr. Lay said. "In fact, on October 
29 I wrote to the president of the Alumni Association and urged that 
the Alumni board convene in my office and give me the opportunity 
to furnish them with any information they might desire about the 
University and its operations. 






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"I feel that the Alumni directors have taken a wise step in 
addressing their resolution to the State Teachers College Board, 
which is the agency designated by law to govern this institution, 
and I shall welcome any inquiry which the Board wishes to make, 

"I am not insensible to the fact that many irresponsible rumors 
have been circulating, and that some wild charges have been voiced. 
Any person who has the interest of the University at heart should 
present complaints with any evidence in his possession to the 
only agency which can legally take cognizance of them — the State 
Teachers College Board." 

President Lay declined to comment further on any of the specific 
rumors or published attacks upon the University* s administration, 
except to say, "I wonder at what motives must prompt such attacks 
when the accomplishments are so outstanding," 

He mentioned among the ^o.csnt'--a<;c'6iaplishments: increased 
budgets, higher standing with accrediting agencies, strengthened and 
expanded faculty, ofero.aderied administrative structure, commitments 
from the Federal government for more student veteran housing 
in proportion to the size of the University than any other 
institution in Illinois, and creation of opportunities and the 
safeguarding of the interests of student veterans. 

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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Attention: Snorts Editors 



Carbondale, 111. November -Plenty of seats will be available 
in MacAndrew Stadium here Saturday for the Southern Illinois Normal 
University-Northern Illinois State Teacher IIAC crown clash, Maroon 
Athletic Director Glenn t! Abe" Martin has announced. 

Bleachers will be installed on the east side of the stadium to 
boost the arena's capacity to 8,500, Martin said. Game time, he 
reminded fans, will be 2> p.m. 

Last year these same Northern Huskies came down from DeKalb and 
dealt Southern a 13-7 defeat that knpcked the parpens from thV 
conference lead into soSgnd place behind State Normal. 

This year, however, both the Huskies and the maroons are unbeaten 
and untied in loop play, and this Saturday's fracas will decide the 
rulers of the 1%6 IIAC, 

On the books, the Northerners look best, having lost only one 
contest in season's play, while the Martin-men have won four and lost 
three. Nevertheless, the Maroons will be playing on their home field, 
and together with a motive of revenge, are given a fair chance of 
upsetting the Huskies. 

The fans will have -"T" served to them all day as both of the title 
contenders use this deceptive formation. For Southern, Bill Malinsky 
of Flora will direct operations in the Maroon backfield, with the able 
assistance of left halfback Bob Johnson of Du^uoin, right halfback 
Gene Stotlar of Pinckneyville , and fullback Lawrence Calufetti of 
Johnston City. 

The Huskies will counter with Kaczala in the tailback spot, 
Robinson and Henni^an at halfback, and Lyons at fullback. Northern 
Coach Chick Evans also has some top-flight linemen in tne persons of 
left tackle Duf field, and left guard Arquilla. 

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Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■^■■■i 



Carbondale, 111., Nov. -Two outstanding soloists have been v.- -,. 
secured to sin^ the soprano and contralto leads in Southern Illinois 
Normal University's production of Handel's "The Messiah" here Dec. 15, 
Dr. Mauri ts Kesnar, professor of music and chairman of the music 
department, has announced. 

Miss Camille Anderson, well known in the fields of oratorio, 
concert, radio and opera, will sing the soprano solo role, while Miss 
Alia Zopf Woods, St. Louis church and radio singer, will appear as the 
contralto lead. 

"Miss Anderson has won praise of the most exacting critics in 
each of the fields in which she has sung," Dr. Kesnar pointed out. 
"As an oratorio singer she has appeared as a soloist with most of the 
oratorio societies in the Middle Vest, as a radio artist she has sung 
on the 'Hymns of All Churches' program. Recognition came to her in 
1939, when she won the Young Artist Contest of the Society of American 
Musicians . 

"She has appeared numerous times in recital, most recently in a 
recital in Kimball Hall, Chicago, Nov. 22." 

Miss Woods, Dr. Kesnar said, has appeared numerous times through- 
out the Middle West and South as an oratorio soloist. She is contralto 
soloist at the Kings Highway Presbyterial Church, St. Louis, is a 
* member of the KSD Mixed Quartet, and a member of the St. Louis Friday 
Morning Musicale. 

The University will present "The Messiah" Sunday evening, Dec. 15, 
in Shryock Auditorium on the University campus, with a 250-voice choir 
composed of singers from all parts of Southern Illinois, and a 60-piece 
orchestra. 



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Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■^■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■i 



Carbondale, 111., Nov. -The Southern Illinois Normal University 
freshmen cagers took a 72-43 decision from the Pinckneyville V/onders 
last Saturday night on the losers' court, as the Maroons opened the 
current cage season on a keynote of last year's finish. 

The Maroon first got off to a slow start, but by the half had 
built up a commanding 31-19 lead. The contest gave the Southern 
mentors an idea of what to expect from the beginning cagers. 

The following men made the trip for the Maroons: Joe Spagnoli 
of Hurst; John and Charles Goss of Marion; Vallie West of Pinckneyville 
Bob Colborn of Flora; Jackie Long of Flora; Don Riggs of Fairfield; , 
Jim Sexton of Gillespie; John Ruzick of Johnston City; Jack Eaddie of 
West Frankfort; Galan Davis of Du Quoin; Joe Franza of Murphysboro. 

The varsity team National Intercollegiate Tourney and Illinois 
Intercollegiate Athletic Conference crown defenders, will open the 
current season next Saturday night at 6 V :15 p.m. when they entertain 
Onized Glass and Shefford Mfg. Co. of Alton in the local Gymnasium. 



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Southern Illinois 
Normd University 



Information Service CARBONDALE - ILLINOIS 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^^■■■■■■^^^^■^^^■■■M 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 11-13-46 



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Carbondalo, 111., Nov. — With the Illinois Intercollegiate 

Conference crown at stake, the Southern Illinois Normal University 
Maroons will play host to the Northern Illinois State Teachers in 
MacAndrew Stadium next Saturday afternoon at 2 p.m. Both teams are 
. unbeaten and untied in conference play so far this year. 

Southern will be out to avenge last year's defeat at the hands 
of these same Northern Huskies who knocked the Maroons out of the 
title race in the final game of the season. However, this year the 
Huskies have matched the Karoons victory for victory through the 
conference until next Saturday when the string will run out for one or 
the other. 

as a comparison of the two elevens, Southern defeated Eastern 
29-0 while Northern dropped them 26-0. The maroons beat T ./estern 19-7 
while the Huskies slipped by them 14-13 • Southern defeated State 
Normal 13-7, while Northern knocked them off 13-3* The Maroons have 
scored 6l points in IIaG play while they have been dented for only 14* 
On the other hand, the Huskies have racked up only 53 markers while 
allowing 16 against them. Thus the Southerners have a slight edge 
if past scores mean anything. 

Southern Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin has intimated that he will stick 
by his lineup that he has used in the past. They will w o in as 
follows: left end -Galan Davis of Du Quoin; left tackle- Jim Lovin of 
Benton; left guard-Myron Schuster of Murphysboro; center-Charlie Heinz 
of Gillespie; right guard-Bill Cosgrove of Benton; right tackle-Sam 
Milosevich of Zei^ler; ri/jht end-Leedio Cabutti oi Johnston City; 
quarterback-Bill Malinsky of Flora; left halfback-Bob Johnson of 
Du'^uoin; ri_ht halfback-Gene Stotlar of Pinekneyville; fullback- 
Lawrence Calufetti of Johnston City. 

Gai.ietime is set for 2 p.m. instead of the usual 2:30 p»m., Martin 
h^s announced, 

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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED, 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



11-14-46 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111., Nov. --A new lavishly-illustrated booklet, 
"Kindergartens for Illinois/" has been issued b_ the Illinois State 
Association for Childhood Education, Dr. Sina M. tiott, director of 
the kindergarten and nursery school at Southern Illinois Normal 
University here, announced. 

The booklet was written with the cooperation of the National 
Association for Childhood Education, the Illinois Congress of Parent; 
and Teachers, the Illinois Education Association, and the Office of 
the State Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

Usin actual hoto.'-ra^hs submitted by various kindergarten 
groups throughout the State, the booklet graphically demonstrates 
the work which is carried on in a typical kindergarten. 

The material is presented in three sections: (1) "Why do I 
send my child to kindergarten?", answered by parents; (2) " Why do 
I believe in kindergartens?**, answered by some of the well-known 
leaders in primary education; and (3) ''Studies in Relation to 
Kindergarten Experience." 

The booklet was prepared for distribution to parents, school 

superintendents, teachers, -.no. sciruol boards. Copies may be obtair-^ 
f")r a nominal sum (25 cents) from the student chapter of the 
association for Childhood _,duc..tion h^re-'it the University*.. 

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Southern Illinois 
Normal University ! 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 




Information Service 


LOBENA L> n U M M O N D , ED 




Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 


11,14-46 



Carbondalo, ill., Nov. --Appointment of a new physician at 
Southern Illinois Normal University has been announced by President 
Chester F. Lay. 

The new man is Dr. Victor H. Bienkc, who will report December 1 
as assistant professor and associate physician in the University 
Health Service. 

a graduate of Illinois College at Jacksonville, Dr. Bienke holds 
the doctor of medicine degree from the University of Cincinnati . He 
externed three years at the Catherine Booth Maternity Hospital, and 
had nine months' rotating internship at the Evangelical Hospital 
in Chicago, During the war he served in the Army Medical Corps, 
commanding the Sixth Medical Battalion in combat and occupation 
duty in Korea. 

Dr. Bienke is married and his home, is in '.Stanton, ...1 11. 

if if if 

Carbondale, 111., Nov. --A proup of school children from Bm c ^ 

ochool in Carbondale, aopej.red today (Friday, Nov. 15) on Southern 

Illinois Normal University's radio program, "Education Time", over 
Stations WJPF , Herrin, and UEBQ, Harrisburg. 

Th^ program the youngsters presented w^s entitled "Do You Havea 
A Hobby?" and wav directed by Willis E.Mai one of the University's 
College of Education. 

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Southern Illinois formal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



11-14-46 






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Carbondale, 111., Nov. - With the public schools of Georgia 
Is a "guinea pig," educators from some 35 states, the District of 
Columbia, , Puerto 3ico and Czechoslovakia held a week- long clinic 

I'ovember 3-3 to consider current problems in teacher ediication, Dr. 
pPed '". ^agsdale, professor of education at Southern Illinois 'formal 
university, reports. 

Dr. lagsdale, who is director of the Allyn Training School, a 
carious laboratory school for student teachers at the University, was 
one of five representatives from the State of Illinois, who attended 
the clinic in Atlanta, '"-a. 

"IJany Southern states ere known to have low education standards," 
Dr. Rags dale stated, "but Georgia has made noticeable improvement in 
the past few years. She offered to act as guinea pip in the study of 
county and city supervisory education in teacher education. 

"Y7e visited Georgia schools for two days and spend the remainder 
of cur time in evaluation of the program we observed in action, and 
in discussion oi problems prevalent in teacher education today, 

r 'One of there problems is improveing the standards of teacher 
recruitment, which were lowered during the war by issuance of teacher 
certificates, Georgia bis raised her teaching level by requiring 

four years to obtain the bachelor decree for both Negro and white 
teachers, better salaries, similar for Negro a nd white teachers, 

certified standards, and a supervisory setup that is in close contact 

with the state department o± education." 

Among the consultants and organization representatives present 

wer-e Dr. Karl '7. Bigelow, Teachaers College, Columbia University; 

peniamin b. Trader, U. s. Ofiice of Education; Dean V7. T . Peik, 

College of Education, University of Hinn,; Dean ?:. P. Trabue, State 

College, ?eim.; Dr. Maurice Troy-er, Syracuse University, D. Y. ; Dr. 

Clifford boody, University o~ ?*iCh. ; Dr. Laurence D. -askew, Emory 

University, c-a, 

"The clinic was favorably received," concluded Dr. Paysdale, "and 

I believe that its reception will rSierit holding similar clinics in 

the future." 



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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED, 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Attention: Snorts Editors 



Carbondale, 111., l T ov. --Si:: schools will be repr^ . c ;ented 
when the starting gun for the Illinois Intercollegiate l^hlieiie 
Conference and Invitational Gross-Country Meet sounds at the o oa3 t -lag 
line on the hill and dale course at Southern Illinois Normal Uh: ver-sit 
Saturday morning. 

Besides the regular conference members — Southern, Northern, 
Western, Eastern, and State Normal-- two other colleges, Wheat on and 
Illinoic Tech, will send delegates to the meet. Wheaton and State 
Normal are favored in this meet, according to Southern cross-country 
coach Leland P. n Doc" Lingle, but the Maroons of Carbondale are 
unbeaten in season's play so far this year, although they were tied 
by Western in an earlier meet, and should give their guests a hard 
way to go. 

The Maroons sextet will consist of Glen H ami 1 ton of Pinckney- 
ville, Leonard Burden of Herrin, Bill Dorrls of llerrin, Edward Miller 
of Carbondale, William Keene of Carrier Mills, and Bob Lunneman of 
Pinckneyville. Candidate ■ /^or Southern's individual honors is 
expected to be Louis Peehineno of Christopher. 

The barriers will get away at 11 a.m., to avoid inter! erence 
from the football game which will start at 2 p.m. 

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Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CABBONDALE ' "- UNO ' s 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. — M ^ I^BMBBB ■■■ 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies and Weeklies 

Carbondale, 111. Nov. Saturday, November 16, will 50 down in 
history of Southern Illinois Normal University as a sad date, as the 
cross-country team were dethroned as II^C champions by the Gt-.te 
Normal Harriers in the rooming, while Northern Illinois State Teach- 
ers powerful _,rid machine knocked Southern 1 s hopes' for; tholiootball 
loop ci own sunder by a 10-0 drubbing in the ..fternoon. 

Five teams entered the cross-country affair, which was both 
conference c*nd invitational, and Uhe^ton College, the non-member of 
the loop coached by Gil Dodds, wound up in first place as their star, 
Bob Buker, crossed the finish line in 19:50.5. 

The schools-- wound up as follows in the invitational: first- 
T 'Jheaton (26 points); second-State Normal (51); third-Southern (77); 
foutth-We stern (91); fifth-Eastern (9e). 

In the conference race, which was won oy Louis DePrimo of 
Normal in 20:50.5, the members finished as follows: first-State 
Normal (29); second-Southern (51); third-western (66); fourth- 
Eastern (74). 

Southern's representatives finished thus: William Keene of 
Carrier Mills-12; Leonard Burden of Herrin-14; Glen Hamilton of 
Pinckneyville-15 ; Bob Lunneman of Pinckneyviile-16; Buddy Miller of 
Carhondale-21; Bill Dorris of oenton-27. 

In kacAndrew Stadium, the Northern Huskies^ who came to town 

tied with the i-Iaroons for the conference lead, ran their behemoth 

lines in anil out of the game, stifiling aouahern's ground attack, and 

their halfback Minnehan , almost single-handedlv broke up the maroon's 

passing attack as he intercepted two riaroon tosses, one of which was 

turned into a touchdown drive by Hennigan for Northern. 

In the second period, Southern Quarterback Bill Malinsky of 
Flora, attempted to hit right enaLeedio Gabutti of Johnston City 
ffith a fairly long toss, but Minnehan came down with the ball, and 
carried it from his own 1+8 to Southern's 15-. 

The Huskies cracked over in six plays, as halfback Harry Hennigan 
bulled his way across from the two-yard line. Hennigan also booted 
the extra point and Norhtern led 7-0 at the Half. 

■7ith neither team seemingly able to score in the third ...na four- 
th down, Hennigan booted a perfect strike between the crossbars for 



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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 






three points, to ice up the contest and the conference crown. 

Southern's biggest threat came in the second period when they 
drove down to the Northern nine yard line, but were turned 
back by the Huskies, This was the last game of the 1946 football 
season for Southern, 



# # # 



Information Service 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Release on receipt. 






Carbondale, 111. Nov. Although defeated 21-7 last Saturday 
by a powerful Evansville eleven, the Southern Illinois Normal Univer- 
sity I'laroons will ,_,o into this week's crucial contest against Northern 
Illinois State Teachers College undefeated in conference play, and 
the IIaC crown will hinge on the outcome. 

The i.aroons, coached oy Glenn i? .».oe f ' kartinj were bewildered 
by an Indiana team that could shift into just about any offensive 
formation and dropped behind in the first period when the Aces 
climaxed a long drive with a three-yard smash by halfback Bailey to 
take a six point lead. Hawkins converted ana the scoring activities 
were ended in the first _. ariod. 

The i*Iartin-men seemed to snap out of their lethargy in the 
second quarter when John Ruzich of Johnston City intercepted an Ace 
pass in Evansville ' s 45-yard stripe and, with the help of a block by 
Bob Johnson of Du Quoin, raced the 55 yards for a touchdown. Bret 
McGinnis of Carbondale threw fear into the hearts of local fans as 
he booted a strike through the crossbars and Southern tied the score 
7-7. 

It was a fairly even battle during the third period as neither 
eleven could dent the other's ^oal line, however, in the last quarter 
Evcuiisviile climaxed another power drive witn a ten-yard ran by 
Ossenberg co cross the karoons _pal line lor the second time. The 
point was added b Hawkins and Evansville led 14-7. 

The last Hoosier counter came when the Aces worked the sleeper 

play. The iaaroons \ ^re wise to the pl^y but halfback Gene Stotlar 

of Pinckneyville slipped and f ell as he tried to create it up, and 

Bailey completed iris pass ot ids ri ht end fort he score. Hawkins 

converted for the final score of the day* 

The Southern tackling was off ana the Evansville backs usually 
went five or ten y..rds a iter being hit. Stellar lint play v; as shown 
by Jim Lovin of Benton and Charlie Beinz of Gillespie for the iiaroons, 
while Johnson broke off the prettiest peice of broken field running 
of the day for the Southerners. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■■■■ 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111., Nov. --Dr. B. F. Hall nas been secured as 
speaker for the Religious Emphasis Week student convocation in Shryock 
Auditorium Tuesday morning, Rev.. Douglas MacNaughton, director of the 
University Student Christian Foundation, has announced. 

Dr. Hall received his bachelor of arts degree at Davidson College 
and his bachelor of divinity degree at Union Theological Seminary, 
Va. The master of theology and doctor of theology degrees were taken 
in 1933 and 1937 respectively. He received an honorary degree of 
doctor of divinity in 1942 in Fulton, Mo. 

Among his positions have been, those of pastor in Morehead City, 
N. C, pastor of Central Presbyterian church, St. Louis, president of 
the Metropolitan Church Federation of St. Louis, and vice president of 
the Missouri Council of Churches. 

Dr. Hall has lectured and written extensively on international 
affairs. 

Religious Emphasis Week at Southern is being sponsored by the 
University Christian Mission of the Federal Council of Churches. Four 
other religious leaders who will be on campus for' the week are Clark 
Ellzey, teacher of education for marriage in the division of home and 
family at Stephens College; Dr ; J. H. Nichols, assistant professor of 
history of Christianity at the University of Chicago; Mrs. Anna Mow, 
teacher in the religious education department of Bethany Biblical 
Institute, Chicago; and Bayard S. Clark, rector of Christ Church in 
Cape Girardeau, Mo. 

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Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 1MBMH«BBBB»HI^HBBBBBBHKSBB!IMHHBBBI 






1 



Release Tuesday 

Carbondale, 111., Nov. 27 -A realignment of coaching power at 
Southern Illinois Normal University effective immediately placed Lynn 
C. Holder, instructor in physical education and assistant coach, in the 
position of head basket ball coach, Athletic Director Glenn "Abe" 
Martin announced today, 

Martin himself has been coaching basket ball and last year took 
his charges to the championship of the Illinois Intercollegiate 
Athletic Conference and to the title at the 'Kansas City Intercollegiate 
Basket Ball Tournament. 

''Holder was brought here this summer with the idea of eventually 
making him head basketball coach, 5 ' Martin explained. 

"We had originally planned that I would continue to coach basket 
ball this season, since we thought last year's championship squad would 
be intact. However, it now develops that only one of last year's first 
string players will be able to start the season, so it looks like a 
good time for Holder to take over and develop his own style of play 
with an entirely new team." 

Martin said the idea of bringing Holder, a former Southern football 
and basket ball star, b'ack as basket ball coach was one originally 
planned by the late William McAndrew, Southern's former athletic 
director and coach. 

Holder played both football and basket ball under McAndrew for 
four years, 1931-35, and won four letters in each sport. He also made 
the all-conference teams in the then- ; 'Little Nineteen" conference, once 
in football and twice in basket ball. 

Holder takes over the coaching job in Southern basket ball at an 
auspicious time, when the school is the title defender after the most 
successful season in the University's history. 

To build his first team he has five lettermen of former years, 
veterans who learned their tricks under Holder's own mentor, Coach 
Mcnndrew, and a whole galaxy of freshmen. 



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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



-2- 



His only hold-over from last year is Leedio Cabutti of Johnston 
City, all-conference star. 

Holder has had plenty of coaching experience since his graduation 
from Southern in February, 1935. For seven years he was director of 
physical education and coached basket ball and football at Lawrenceville 
High School. He entered the Navy in 1942, and had two years at the 
Chapel Hill (N.C.) Pre-Flight Training School, where he was battalion 
commander and coached football, basket ball, swimming, boxing and other 
sports. 

From 1944 until his release to inactive duty in March, 1946, he 
was stationed at San Diego, California, at the Naval Hospital and the 
Naval Training Center, where he was assigned to administrative and 
rehabilitation and physical education work. 

He came to Southern in June, 1946, as instructor in physical • 
education and assistant football and basket ball coach. 

Holder obtained his master's degree in physical education from 
Indiana University, and has done work on his doctor T s degree at the 
University of Illinois. He is married to the former Mary Wayman of 
Murphysboro, and has two children, both boys, 11 and 3 years of age. 

"Of course I'm happy to be back at Southern," he said in commenting 
on his new assignment , "and I'm pleased over the large squad that is out 
for basket ball. VJe had about 115 men turn out for practice, plus about 
20 football players who could not report until football season was over. 

"I can't guarantee another championship," he laughed, "but we do 
have a promising team, and I'm looking forward to a fine season." 

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^ _ ^_ Southern Illinois 

" Normal University 

Information Service CARBONDALE ' ILLlNOIS 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. IMB^^^^^MM^^^^^^BBM^^MB 



Carbondale, 111., Nov. -Gene Stotlar, sophomore from Pinckney- 
ville who played right halfback for the Southern Illinois Normal 

University Maroons the past 1946 grid season, was picked in mid-season 
by the magazine "Football Illustrated" as one of the "stars to be" in 

the 19A-6 edition, 

Stotler was listed along with such standouts as Ed Allique of 
Santa Clara, Bob McClure of Nevada, William Stoll of New York University, 
Russ Reader of Michigan State, Sam Leeper of Montana State, Harry Bonk 
of Maryland, George Walmslay of Rice, John Haramigios of Denver, V/alt 
Trojanoski of Connicticut, Fran Parker of Holy Cross, Hubert Bechtol of 
Texas, Joe Duckworth of Colgate, Bob Goode of Texas Aggies, Ted 
Boudreau of New Mexico, Travis Tidwell of Auburn, Gene Rossides of 
Columbia, Al Hudson of Miami, (Fla.), Billy Hildebrand of Mississippi 
State, and Bill Canfield of Purdue, as probable stars of the future, 

Stotlar was named as all-Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic 
Conference quarterback last year, but was shifted to halfback this 
year to utilize his ability to run broken field, 

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____^ ___ Southern Illinois 

— — __ Normal University 

Information Service CARBONDALE - Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. BiMMBlJBBBt^MSHKaBMMMBHSaBMBHBE 



Carbondale, 111., Nov. -The Southern Illinois Normal University 
cagers opened the current basketball season under their newly-appointed 
coach, Lynn C. Holder, in fine fettle, by making a killing of Chef ford 
Mfg. Co. of Fairfield, and Onized Glass of Alton. 

The men from Fairfield went down on the front end 46-3S, while the 
hilltoppers from Alton were laid waste 78-37 on the back end as the 
Maroons showed greiit scoring power in the last half of the finale. 

PH older used li+ men in the first contest of the twin bill and 18 
men in the finale, to defeat the semi-pro outfits that showed great 
promise but were sadly in need of physical training. 

In the Chefford tilt, Bud Wilson of Fairfield was high point man 
for the winners with ten markers, while Sproul paced the losers with 
15 points. Against Alton, Jack Eadie of West Frankfort rang the bell 
for 18 counters for the victors, while J. Redd had 14 for the glass-men. 

Other: Southern men to participate in the two contests were: Ed 
Moody of DuQuoin; Paul Enrietta of W. Frankfort; Bob Colborn of Flora; 
Joe Franza of Murphysboro; Bill Millspaugh of Norris City; Gene Hall' 
of Galatia; Charles Goss of Marion; Jack Long of Flora; John Ruzich of 
Johnston City; Leedio Cabutti of Johnston City; Don Riggs of Fairfield; 
Oliver Shoaff of lit. Carmel; Carl Birkner of Pinckneyville ; Joe Spagnoli 
of Hurst; J. Goss of Marion; Gene Davidson of Harri.sburg; Barney Genesio 
of Valier. 

The Maroons leave home for their next contest, invading St. Louis 
for a two-night stand, where they will tackle St. Louis University on 
Friday and Washington University on Saturday, December 6-7 respectively. 

tfirtt 

Carbondale, 111., Dec. -Glenn "Abe" Martin, athletic director a:- 

and head football coach at Southern Illinois Normal University, will 

be guest speaker at two football banquets this week and next. On 

Tnursday evening he will address the Mt. Carmel High School team, and 

on Tuesday, Dec. 10, will speak at the banquet sponsored by the Lions 

Club of Eldorado in honor of the Eldorado High Schdol Team. 

On Dec. 12 and 13, Coach Martin will attend a meeting of the I. v _. : •, 
Illinois Intercollegiate .athletic Conference in Chicago, at which next 
year f s football schedule for this conference will be worked out. 






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Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 

Carbondale, 111., Dec. --Southern Illinois high schools are 
invited to attend a speech meet at Southern Illinois Normal University, 
Dec. 14, according to Dr. P. Merville Larson, chairman of the University 
speech department. 

Hosts for Southern's first speech Meet will be Tau Delta Rho, 
University discussion club, the Illinois Upsilon Chapter of Pi Kappa 
Delta, national honorary forensics society, and the University speech 
department . 

Dr. Forrest H. Piose, Dean at Southeast Missouri State College, 
nationally-known speech educator, is scheduled to speak during a 
luncheon on "What's the Pay-off in Speech?", a consideration of 
occupational opportunities for the speech-trained student. 

General regulations for high schools planning to enter follow: 

(1) Every high school student eligible to oarticipate in speech 
activities under Illinois High School Association rules may take part. 

(2) Entries must be postmarked not later than December 9, 1946. 

(3) Seventy-five cents will be required from each student and 
for coach in attendance, which will entitle the person to attend the 
Saturday noon luncheon. 

(4) No student may participate in more than three events. - 

(5) There shall be no limit to the number of students represent- 
ing a school in any event. 

(6) No previous experience shall be requi; .^d of any participant 
in any event • 

(7) A certificate of proficiency shall be awarded to each 
participant . 

(3) Each participating school must supply one judge to be 
available at all times. 

Speeches will fall into the divisions of oratorical declamation, 
dramatic declamation, humorous declamation, extemporaneous speaking, 
original oratory, poetry reading, and group discussion. 

Among the high schools that have accepted the invitation are those 
of McLeansboro, Paducah, T "est Frankfort, Greenville, Sparta, East St. 
Louis, Du Quoin, Newton, Granite City, Charleston, and Zeigler. 



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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



m Southern Illinois 
. Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



12-4-46 



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Garbondale, 111,, Dec. --The invasion of St. Louis will be the 
next task undertaken by Basketball Coach Lynn C. Holder and his charges, 
from Southern Illinois Normal University. 

The Maroons will be entertained by the St. Louis Billikens on 
Friday night, and will meet the Washington University Bears on Saturday 
night, as they try to keep their record of two wins and no blemishes 
intact. 

The Bills will be a tough match for the National Intercollegiate 
champion defenders, as they have back their last year's first team, 
which was considered one of the top cage groups in the country by 
sports experts. Chief threats to the Maroons will be Ed KaCauley and 
Marvin Schatzman, outstanding center and' forward, respectively. 

Neither will the Bears be a soft touch for the Holder-men, and 
veteran forward Stan London, always a dangerous man, will be in action 
when the contest starts. 

Holder has announced that fifteen of the following men will take i .... 
the trip: Gene Hall of Galatia; Oliver Shoaff of Mt. Carmel; Bill 
Millspaugh of Morris City; Jack Eadie of West Frankfort, John Sebastian 
of Odin; Paul Enrietta of West Frankfort; Leedio Cabutti of Johnston 
City; Joe Franza of 1-lurphysboro; Charles and John Goss of Marion; Bob 
Colborn of Flora; Don Riggs of Fairfield; Bud Wilson of Fairfield; John 
Ruzich of Johnston City; Ed Moody of DuQuoin; Joe Spagnoli of Hurst; 
Jack Long of Flora; Carl Birkner of Pinckneyville. 

Although pleased with the performance of his capers last Saturday 
night, Holder said, :? These two St. Louis teams are plenty touch and 
we have our work cut out for us, but we'll be in there all the way." 



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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 






Release Thursday p. m. , Dec. 5 

Carbondale, 111., Dec. 5 -Application blanks were mailed to 
student veterans throughout Southern Illinois today that have applied 
for apartments in the Federal Housing Project which will be opened at 
an early date at Southern Illinois Normal University, the Student 
i Housing Committee has announced, 

Mrs. Mabel Pulliam, chairman of the Student Housing Committee, 
said that all completed application blanks must reach her office no 
later than December 14. 

Additional applications from veterans who have not previously 
applied, will be taken prior to December 14. 

This housing project will provide apartments for 105 married 
student veterans. 

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Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CARBONDALE - Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■i 



Carbondale, 111,, Dec. -To sing the leading male roles in "The 
Messiah'* Handel oratorio to be oresented here at Southern Illinois 
Normal University December 15, Carl 3, Zytowski, tenor, and Carl Nelson, 
bass-baritone, have been engaged, Dr. l-'iaurits Kesnar, professor of music 
I and director for the production, has announced. 

"The Messiah" will be presented as a pre-Christmas oratorio by a 
< 250-voice choir and a 60-piece orchestra. Singers from many Southern 
Illinois communities are participating in the chorus, including the 
well-known Egyptian Choir of West Frankfort, directed by Frank E. '"..... .".• 

Trobaugh, 

The same chorus, cast and principals will also present the oratorio 
in West Frankfort on December lbx. 

Two other noted singers, Miss Camille Anderson, soprano, and Miss 
Alia Zopf Woods of St. Louis, contralto, were announced as soloists 
I last week, 

Mr. Zytowski, tenor soloist, has appeared in recital, oratorio and 
radio, both in this country and in England, During the war he was over- 
seas for more than two years with the Eighth Air Force in England, and 
while there served as coach and tenor of the Eighth air Force Male 
Quartet and director of the Chapel Choristers, 

Before the war he sang with the St. Louis Grand Opera Association. 
At present he is director of music at the Unity Lutheran Church in St. 
Louis, 

Mr. Nelson, bass-baritone soloist, has a voice of exceptional 
[ beauty and power, according to Dr. Kesnar. Years of study and coaching 
have brought artistry and maturity to his singing, the director said. 
He has studied with some of the leading singers and coaches of the 
United States, and has filled engagements throughout the Middle West. 

kHe has sung roles of "The Messiah" and St. Mathews "Passion" with 
most of the country's finest choral societies, and his success in both 
concert and oratorio has been acclaimed by the press in the United »■;..'. ; 
States, Canada and in Europe. 

"The Messiah" will be presented at 7:30 o'clock Sunday evening, 
Dec, 15, in Shryock Auditorium on the University campus. The public is 
invited (no charge). 






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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 

i 

Carbondale, 111., Dec. -Bird eggs--approximately a thousand of 

them — are the newest acquisition of the Southern Illinois Normal 

b University Museum. 
a collection gathered in Southern Illinois over a lifetime by the 
late George Halleck Center of DuQuoin has been presented to the 
University by the collector's son, Virgil Center of Benton. 

"This collection is a very fine one of eggs of birds native to 
this region," declared John Allen, Museum curator. "With the few eggs 
we already had, this gift will make our collection almost complete. 

"We hope to obtain a permit to collect other eggs to fill out the 
few remaining gaps," 

The Center collection represents eggs of hundreds of species of 
birds of this region, from the tiny hummingbird, whose e^,g is little 
larger than a Navy bean, to the hawk, wild turkey and owl. The largest 
egg in the collection is that of the wild turkey, and measures 2 3/4 
inches in length, and 1 3/4 inches at the widest point in diameter. 

Mr, Center, collector of the bird eggs, was a mine superintendent 
at Du.;uoin, who had a life-long interest in the outdoors, according to 
Iir. Allen. He became an authority on wildlife of this region, and was 
a taxidermist of more than ordinary attainment. One of his notable 
catches was a Carolina parrokeet , which he killed up near Hallidayboro, 
and mounted with skill. 

The University Museum represents substantial collections of 
historical relics; documentary materials; pioneer household furnishing, 
farm equipment, professional and trade tools, and firearms; b i ? :.v_ ..Tor 1 
archaeological specimens, and other items pertaining to early pioneer 
and prehistoric life in this region. 

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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Carbondale, 111., Dec. -a book by three Southern Illinois Normal 
University chemistry professors, issued in 1940, is going into a revised 
edition at the request of the publishers. 

This laboratory manual, Experimental General Chemistry , By Drs. 
J. W. Neckers, T. W, Abbott and Kenneth Van Lente, has been selling well 
during the war years, the publishers have informed the authors. The 
book has been used by more than 100 colleges and universities. 

The University professors are now carrying on experimental work for 
the revision. 

The authors have also been informed by the publishers that the U.S. 
j Military .academy at West Point has asked permission to reproduce in 
West Point classes a number of the experiments in the Neckers, Abbott 
and Van Lente manual to supplement their course in general chemistry. 

m 

Carbondale, 111., Dec. -Three representatives from Southern . ! ,r. ,., 
Illinois Normal University attended a regional conference on practice 
teaching at Indiana State Teachers College, Terre Haute, Monday and 
[Tuesday of this week, according to University President Chester F. Lay. 

They were Willis E. Malone, coordinator of practice teaching; Dr. 
Ted R. Ragsdale, principal of the Allyn Training School; and John Mees, 
principal of University High School. 

The meeting was the first regional conference in the country called 
by Dr. J. G. Flowers, president of Southwest Texas State Teachers r -aj^.c .j,*. 
College, San Marcos, Texas, who is chairman of a national survey on 
practice teaching for the American Association of Teachers Colleges. 
a number of national leaders in the field of teacher education were "-: 
present. 

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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



12-9-46 









Carbondale, 111. Dec. Fair warnin__ Was served to the Southern 
Illinois Normal University i^aroons, National and Illinois Intercollegiat 

crown defenders, in St. Louis last weekend as they were defeated by 
the St. Louis Billikens 63-57 on Friday night and just barely eked 
out a 47-43 win over the hopless T fashirg_ton University Bears on Saturday 
night . 

Playing their best game of the current season, the Maroons, under 
the direction of Lynn C. Holder, had mental lapses during which the 
Bills scored at will. Although they had a 30-27 lead at the half, 
the Maroons dropped behind as six-foot eight-inch center Ed Ma caul ey 
began to hit, and onlj a fast last minute drive saved the southerners 
from a worse drubbing. 

Oliver Shoaff of Mt. Carmel, was the big gun for Southern in 
this w ar.it as time after time his set shots had trie St. Louis fans 
.^asping. Johnny Sebastian of Odin was the number t wo man for the 
Maroons with 15 points, while Bob Colborn of Flora had nine. 

In tiie '.!ashin_.ton contest, it looked as if the Maroons were 
_oing to take up where they had left off, as the} jumped into a quick 
lead, and took a 25-15 lead to their dressing room with them at the 
half. 

However, in the second half, the Bears, led by Stan London and 
Johnny Barker, got "hot ,T . During the closing minutes of the game, 
they began to whittle the Southerners' lead and only some fancy ball- 
handling by Shoaff and Leedio Cabutti of Johnston City, saved the day. 
Colborn had 13 points for the winners while Jack Eadie of W. Frankfort 
had 12. 

The Southern Bees fared better as they took the Billiken reserves 
into camp 46-34 on Friday m_ht, and smothered the second string Bears 
65-37 the following afternoon. 

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Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CARBONDALE - i««om 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■^^^ 



12-9-46 

Carbondale, 111. Dec, Glenn Hamilton, sophomore of 
Pinckneyville has been elected honorary captain of the 1946 cross- 
country team at Southern Illinois Normal University, Cross-Country 
Coach Lelend P. "Doc n Lingle has announced. 

William Keene, £r. of Carrier Mills, was chosen captain-elect, 
for 1947, Lingle also announced. 

The Maroon cross-country team, playing host to the Conference 
and state cross-country meets, wound up in third place in state 
competition and second in the Illinois Intercollegiate Conference. 



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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 






f 

12-# 7 46 

Carbondale, 111., Dec. -Prof. A. Chester Hanford, 1909 
graduate of Southern Illinois Normal University, has resigned as 
dean of Harvard College after 19 years' tenure — the longest period 
any one has occupied this pose in Harvard University, according to 
word received here. 

A native of Makanda, Hanford attended Southern and the University 
of Illinois, and obtained the doctor of philosophy degree from 
Harvard. He taught at Harvard both before and after his service in 
the Navy in World War II. 

Pursuing his interest in state and local governments, he served 
in 1915 as investigator for the Illinois Efficiency and Economy 
Commission. In 1916 and 1917 he compiled information for the 
Massachusetts Constitutional Convention. In 1920 he served as 
secretary for a committee on new sources of revenue for Boston. 
Until recently he was a member of the Special Commission on 
Legislative System and Procedure of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts k . 

After his return to Harvard after ty/orld War I, Dr. Hanford in 
1923 was appointed director of the Summer School of Arts and Sciences 
and of Education. In -1927 he was appointed dean of Harvard College, 
a post which has as its major task the supervision of undergraduate 
life at Harvard. 

When his resignation becomes effective in June, he will resume 
his active duties as professor of government, a rank he has held 
since 1930. 

As deafe 4^e is credited with putting into effect many important 
changes in the college, including improvement of scholarship, the 
system of freshman advising, a national scholarship plan, ana the 
beginning of t^e general education plan. 



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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 









Release immediately, 



12-10-46 



Carbondale, 111., Dec. -Resignation of Dr. Robert E. McNicoll, 
associate professer of Latin-American Studies at Southern Illinois 
Normal University, to accept a research position in the U. S. 
Department of State and the appointment of a replacement for him were 
announced today by the University president's office* 

Dr. McNicoll was on wartime assignment with the Department of 
State, and had asked for permanent assignment before accepting the 
position here. His new assignment deals with research on economic 
resources of Latin-America* 

His sacessor is Joseph R. Baxter, who holds the master pf arta 
degree from Duke University and has completed all of the resident 
requirements at Duke for his doctor's degree in Latin American history. 

With four yeqrs of high school teaching behind him, he spent two 
years teaching in the Army kifer Forces historical program and 
collaborating on the history of the AAF Eastern Flying Training Command* 

Since his release from the aaF, Baxter has for the past six-weeks 
been doing research work in Washington, D. C, on his doctoral 
dissertation, 

"We regret to lost Dr. McNicoll' s services," University President 
Chester F. Lay declared today, "but we realize that permanent 
appointment to the staff of the U.S. Department of State is a fine 
opportunity that would be difficult for him to pass up. Actually, his 



going to this new position from Southern will afford us and our new 
Latin-American Studies program considerable recognition. 

"We are happy that we could obtain a young historian with such 
high recommendations as Mr. Baxter to take over Dr. McNicoll's work 
here for the remainder of the year. 

"We are looking forward to expanding the work in Latin-American 
Studies considerably during the next biennium, if our request for a 
four and one-half million dollar appropriation is granted by the 
General Assembly. One of the items in that requested budget is for the 
addition of a second outstanding specialist in this field." 



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12-10-46 
Carbondale, 111., Dec. -Appointment of Miss Dorothy E. Heicke 
as assistant cataloguer in the library of Southern Illinois Normal 
University has been announced by tifce presidents office. 

Miss Heicke comes from the University of Illinois library, where 
she has been a eataloguer since 1937. She is a graduate of the 
University of Illinois, holding the bachelor of arts, the bachelor of 
science, and the mastea? of arts in library science degrees. She 
§§rv§d aa assistant in the public libraries at Bloomington and at 
Highland Park before joining the University of Illinois library staff. 



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Southern Illinois 

________ Normal University 

Information Service CARBONDALE - Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. HUliainHlillillllMHi^MHiHH 



12-10-46 

Carbondale, 111. Dec. Lackadaisical passing and Kentucky's 
height made the difference Monday night as the Southern Illinois 
Normal University cagers went down to their second defeat of t he season, 
this time at the hands of Western Kentucky b/ the score of 62-4$» 

Approximately 1,700 fans jam-packed Tilghman gymnasium in Paducah 
to watch Kentucky, who is out to regain its high national rating, blast 
the faltering Maroons, National Intercollegiate defending champions* 

The Kentuckains' attack was led by "Sleepy" Spears, six-foot 
four-inch forward, who poured 21 points through the hoop, and Johnny 
Oldham, six-foot two-inch forward, who counted ten times. 

Gene Hall of Galatia led the Maroons' scoring with 12 points, while 
Johnny Sebastian of Odin rang the bell for eight. Oliver Shoaff of 
Mt. Carmel had seven tallies as did Bud Wilson of Fairfield. 

The "Tiptoppers 1 ' , as the Kentucky team is sometimes called because 
of their height, started off with a bang, as they scored six points 
before the Maroons could pry the lid off of their basket, and through 
most of the half, they had a ten point lead. However, during the last 
four minutes in the first half, the Southerners showed some of their 
old form, and led by Hall, they crept to within four points of the 
leaders, leaving the floor trailing 1&-22. 

Southern fans, of whom there wore quite a few, expected great 
things during the second half, but before a minute had passed, it was 












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apparent that the Maroons had slipped back into their early-game ways, 
and the Kentuckians built up a lead never to be topped, 

A feature sidelight of the game was Kentucky coach, Ed. Diddle, 
who carries a towel with him all during the game, and at one time 
during the current contest, when a "Tiptopper" had received a cut lip, 
was seen to dry real tears from his eyes. 

The Maroons racked up 11 foul shots out of 24 chances while the 
Kentuckians made 13, irom the same number of chances* 

Next Saturday the Maroons will journey to New Orleans to do 
battle with Loyola University, one of the highlight trips of their 
season. The Maroons have built up a friendly rivalry with the New 
Orleans men, having been defeated by this crew in the Kansas City T . , 
National Intercollegiate Tourney in 1944-45 season in the finals, and 
last year gaining revenge by eliminating the Loyolans in the third 
round of play in the same tournament, after whipping them earlier in 
the regular season. 

The Southerners next home game is set for December 18 when they 
play host to Arkansas State. 



_ 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 






28-10-46 

Carbondale, 111., Dec. 11 — A tota 1 of 2,483 students have 
enrolled for the winter term at Southern Illinois Normal University 
here, the Business Office announced Tuesday at the close of the second 
day of registration* 

This figure compares with a final registration of 2,718 for the 
fall term, but is not far below " the 2,570 who had registered by 
the end of the third clay last fall* 

Students started cla sses Wednesday morning, Dec, 11, but late 
comers ma2r continue to register through December 20, and it is 
thought that late registrants will probably boost the total for this 
term to around 2,600 or a little more* 

In normal times at colleges and universities throughout the 
country, a decline of some 10 to 15 per cent usually occurs from 
the fall term to the winter term, University officials pointed out. 
On the basis of present indications, the drop here this year will be 
much smaller than the usual trend.: 



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Southern Illinois 
1 Normal University 

Information Service CARBONDALE < uawois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. JiillWiiM i yi ^BMBBnE aiMIMyH^IWHIJMiUillMil i miUlM 



12-11-46 

Carbondale, 111,, Dec. -The Southern Illinois Normal University 
ca^e Maroons will attempt to get on the victory trail again next 
Saturday night as they travel to the deep south to take on Loyola 
University of the South, at New Orleans, 

The Maroons have had rough going so far this season, as each team 
they have met has been gunning for them, as a result of their 
winning of the National Intercollegiate Tournament last year. 

With only on© member of last year's aggregation available, that 
being Leedio Cabutti of Jonston City, the Maroons opened the season 
with a double-header against two manufacturing teams and looked great, 
downing them both by rather one-sided scores. 

However, their encounter with St. Louis left their followers with 
the ideq that they could use some of the members of last year's stellar 
aggregation. The following night against Washington University, even 
though the Maroons came away- victorious, fans were sure that the Marooon* 
werenot the same calibre as last year, at least not this early in the 
season, ^ 

On Monday night, when the Maroons took a 14-point defeat at the 
hands of the Western Kentucky Teachers, they looked listless, their 
defense was haphazard, and their passing was loose. 

However, Head Basketball coach Lynn C. Holder said that he had 
scheduled these tough contests purposely to iron out the wrinkles 
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developed by many of the returning lettermen in the service. 

Men making the trip to New Orleans are: Gene Hall of Galatia; 
Oliver Shoaff of Mt. Carmel; Bob Colborn of Flora; Quentin Stinson 
of Eldorado; John Sebastian of Odin; Bud Wilson of Fairfield; 
John Ruzich of Johnston City; Leedio Cabutti of Johnston City; 
Charles Goss of Marion; Bill Millspaugh of Norris City; 

m ■ 

Carbondale, 111. December -The Southern Illinois Normal 
University Reserves, victorious in their five starts of the season, 
will tangle with the Wpodmen of America, a local five, in a benefit 
tilt sponsored by the Carbondale Lions for the improvement of the 
marking of streets of the City, on Thursday night. Game time is 
£ p.m. 

Last Tuesday night, the Bees took two contests from teams from 
Marion, 111., downing Spillertown in the curtain-raiser 55-44, 
and the Marion Mules 54-33 in the finale. 

Bud Wilson of Fairfield was the high point man in the first 
tilt with 11 markers, Johhny Ruzich of Johnston City was high in 
the second game with 13 points. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service caebohdali. ulihoi. 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^■■^^^■■■■■■■■^^^^■^■■■^^■I^BH^U 



12-11-46 

Carbondale, 111., Dec, -Southern Illinois Normal University- 
has been selected by the U. S. Marine Corps as one of the accredited 
colleges and universities in which to re-open its officers training 
program for the Marine Corps Reserve, the University President's 
Office has announced. 

A letter from Gen. A. A. Vandergrift, commandant of the U. S. 
Marine Corps, to President Chester F. Lay , outlined the proposed 
program and invited the University's participation, 

A group of Marine officers will visit the campus early in 1947 
to hold interviews with Southern students who a re interested in 
enrolling as reservists in the Marine program* 

The program will be open to unmarried men students pursuing a 
course of instruction other than one leading to a Medical, Dental or 
Theological degree, who will not be more than 25 years of age by the 
time they are commissioned. 

Summer military training— either six or twelve weeks, depending 

on whether or not the student has had prior military service-*-will 

be required. Students will receive Jf^O per month during the first 

six weeks of this summer training, $100 per month for the second six 

weeks. 

On graduation and after completion of the required military 
training, the students 'will be commissioned second lieutenants in the 
M&ri<ne Corps Reserve, although a limited number may be commissioned 
in the regular Marine Corps. 

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Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service carbondale. iluno.s 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■i^BMHMMMMBBBMu 

■ WM ™ B I ■■ ■■ ■ ■I— 1 III 1 I 1 M — ■■■ ■■■ ■'■ » ■ ■■ l.l ■■■■■■ |l,„ 

12-11-46 

Carbondale, 111., Dec. -Southern Illinois Normal University 
has been selected by the U. S. Marine Corps as one of the accredited 
colleges and universities in which to re-open its officers training 
program for the Marine Corps Reserve, the University president's 
Office has announced. 

A letter from Gen. A. A. Vandergrift, commandant of the U. S. 
Marine Corps, to President Chester F. Lay , outlined the proposed 
program and invited the University's participation. 

A group of Marine officers will visit the campus early in 1947 
to hold interviews with Southern students who a re interested in 
enrolling as reservists in the Marine program. 

The program will be open to unmarried men students pursuing a 
course of instruction other than one leading to a Medical, Dental or 
Theological degree, who will not be more than 25 years of age by the 
time they are commissioned. 

Summer military training — either six or twelve weeks, depending 

on whether or not the student has had prior military services-will 

be required. Students will receive ^90 per month during the first 

six weeks of this summer training, $100 per month for the second six 

weeks. 

On graduation and after c ompletion of the required military 
training, the students will be commissioned second lieutenants in the 
Marine Corps Reserve, although a limited number may be commissioned 
in the regular Marine Corps. 

### 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 




12-11-46 

Carbondale, 111., Dae. * a Modern Dance Club, organized for 
the first time this fall, will majce its bow to the public here at 
Southern Illinois Normal University next week, when a Christmas dance, 
f '0 Holy Night ,( , will be presented at the student assembly on Thursday, 
December 19. 

Directed by Miss Jean Stehr, instructor in physical education 
for women, the group is composed of 16 students. 

The dance to be performed h^re was created by Nell Bradley of 
anna and other members of the dance group. It protrays the joyful 
and prayerful moods of the Christmas season. 

Miss Bradley and Opal Ruff of Shelbyville dance a duo while the 
other members dance in two larger groups. The members who will 
participate in the Christmas program are: Betty ^elams of Sparta; 
Lois Banker of Fairfield; Angelena Ferrari of Royalton; Judy Ferguson 
of Edwardsville; Helen Gresham of Pana; Jean Haroldson of Carbondale; 
Anna I^rie Harn of Murphysboro; *lice Krieshok of Madison; Verna Legg 
of Wayne City; Martha McBrayer of Benton; Doroiihy Mitchell of Granite 
City; Georgia Mircheff of Madison; Carolyn Reinbold of Herrin; Vera 
Turner of Montsanto; Miss Ruff and Miss Brad}ey # 

The group is accompanied by Yolande Byassee of Creal Springs, 
and Lovean Roszkowski of Royalton, 

Miss Stehr, who directs the grou^ was formerly a member of the ' 
noted Duggan Dancers at Texas State College for Women. 



■I 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED, 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 






12-11-46 

Carbondale, III,, Dec. - Approximately 75 high school orators, 
declaimers , extemporaneous speakers, debaters, and other speech activity 
representatives will gather at Southern Illinois Normal University 
Saturday for a one-day Speech Meet* 

Guest speaker for the occasion will be Jr. Forrest H. Rose, 
dean at Southeast Missouri State College, who will address the 
contestants at the luncheon session on "What's the Fay-Off in Speech?" 
in which he will discuss job opportunities ahead for the speech-trained 
student . 

Southern's new speech department, headed by Dr. P. Merville 
Larson; Tau Delta Rho, local discussion club; ana Pi Kappa Delta, 
national honorary forensics society will be joint hosts for the occasion. 

The meet will include the following events: oratorical declamation; 
dramatic declamation; humorous declamation; extemporaneous speaking; 
original oratory; poetry reading; and ,_;roup discussion. 



Carbondale, 111,, Dec, 



Ben Watkins, assistant professor of 



art at Southern Illinois Normal University, is currently showing a 
group of 14 pictures — all painted since he came to Southern last spring 
— at Ohio T ;esleyan University, Delaware, Ohio, 

The exhibit includes two drawings which have been included in the 
Midwestern Museams association circulating exhibit; seven oils, and 
five water colors. 

Watkins is scheduled to have a joint exhibition with krs. 
Dorothea Swan, also of the University are faculty, here in January 
and will have a one-man show in Galerie Neuf, New York City, next 
spring or summer, The New York show will include ceramic sculptures 
as well as paintings and drawings. 



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Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



. 



^~>~ Dailies and Weeklies 

if . • 

Carbondale, 111, , Dec, -Four members of the 1946 Southern 
I] "• i:~.ois Normal. University grid squad have been named on an all-confer- 
ence all-opponent team by v^stern Illinois State Teachers College, the 
athletic department has announced, 

They are Gene Stotlar of Pinckneyville, Bob Johnson of DuQuoin, 
Bill Cosgrove of Benton, and Jeff Mitchell of Zeigler. 

Stotlar and Johnson are both halfbacks , while Mitchell plays tackle 
and Cbsgfove Is & guard/ 

The rest of the team consisted of: left end-Larry Brink of 
Northern; left tackle-Bernie Hayton of Eastern; center-Aldo Sebben of 
State Normal; right guard-Ed Mascal of Northern; right end-Roosevelt 
Banks of State Normal; right halfback- Johnny Stabler of Eastern; 
fullback-Harry Hennigan of Northern, 

Four Southerners, Bill Halinsky of Flora; Lawrence Calufetti. of 
Johnston City; John Catlin of Benton; and Galan Davis of DuQuoin,. 
received honorable mention in the Leatherneck poll. 



i 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. B^"BBB«MM«^"«MHBHMBMBMBH«HMMMMBB1|! ( 



lilf 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Dailies and Weeklies 



Carbondale, 111.,.. Dec —"Codling Moth Control— a Study of { 
Growers' Practices," bulletin by Stewart C. Chandler, field 
entomologist of the Illinois Natural History Survey and consulting 
entomologist of Southern Illinois Normal University, has been released 
by the University of Illinois Agricultural Experiment Station, and 
contains valuable information for the Southern Illinois fruit grower. 

Chandler's plan of investigation included observation of 13 apple 
orchards, all in the three-brooded area of Southern Illinois, where 
codling moth control is normally more difficult than it is farther 
north. One was near Belleville, one near Centralia, and the other 11 
were about 40 miles north of Cairo in Uni rr. ani Johnson counties. 
Some were selected for study because "-he growers usually or 
frequently had difficulty in securing codling moth control; others 
were chosen because the growers normally had good control. The study 
attempts to determine what practices make :°o?. ... ncd codling moth control 
and what for poor control. 

Some of the topics discussed are amount of infestation just before 
harvest; effect of weather, spraying, and sanitation on carryover; effec 
of types and number of spray machines and of spraying methods on control 
effect of various spray schedules and of spacing en control; factors 
causing good poison deposit- 
In the appendix are spray schedules and a note on 1945 and 1946 
tests with DDT. 

* if § 

Carbondale, 111., Dec. --S. C. Chandler } field entomologist of 
the Illinois Natural History Survey and consulting entomologist of 

§ Southern Illinois Normal University, will speak at the annual meeting of 
the Illinois State Horticultural Society in Springfield, Dec. 9-11 on 
"Fruit Insects of 1946 with Forecasts for the Coming Season." 









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Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CARBONDALE - "-"hois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ 






Carbondale, 111. Dec. -Ten men will take the trip to Kansas 
City to represent Southern Illinois Normal University in the Christmas 
holiday tournament to be held there December 27-23, the athletic 
department has announced. 

The four teams that will participate in the yuletide play are 
Southern, Colorado Aggies, St. Mary's of California, and Rockhurst 

College. St. Mary's will meet Rockhurst in the curtain-raiser on 
Friday while Southern will tackle Colorado in the finals. On Saturday 
night, the two losers will meet in the first contest, while the two 
winners will vie for the tourney crown in the final game. 

The men to make the journey for Southern are: Johnny Sebastian 
of Odin; Oliver Shoaff of Mt. Carmel; Quentin Stinson of Eldorado; 
Bob Colborn of Flora; John Ruzich of Johnston City; Bud Wilson of 
Fairfield; Bill Millspaugh of Norris City; Gene Hall of Galatia; 
Charles Goss of Marion; Leedio Cabutti of Johnston City. 

ffMifM 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CARBONDAL6 1LLIN01S 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



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Carbondale, 111. Dec. -Prac^jfc^ for the Kansas City 
Invitational Christmas tournament will be held at 7 pm Christmas 
night, Southern Illinois Normal University Basketball Lynn C. 
Holder has Announced. 

The ten Maroons named to represent Southern at the tourney will 
try to regain their last week's form which might have been slightly 
dulled at the Christmas dinner table, and then they will leave 
Carbondale at 4 am on the following morning. 

The Southerners are entered in the classic with three other 
teams; the Solorado Aggies, who will be the Maroon's first round 
opponents' on Friday night, Rockhurst College, and St. Mary's of 
California. 

The ten men to make the trip, besides Holder and Athletic 
Director Glenn "Abe" Martin, are: Johnny Sebastian of Odin; Oliver 
Shoaff of Mt. Carmel; Quentin Stinson of Eldorado; Bob Colborn of 
Flora; John Ruzich of Johnston City; Bud Wilson of Fairfield; Bill 
Millspaugh of Norris City; Gene Hall of Galatia; Charles Goss of 
Marion; Leedio Cabutti of Johnston City. 

The Maroons have been looking like last year's champions during 

the past week, as they pasted Arkansas State 72-31, and took a 

57-54 thriller from Indiana 3'tate. 

With the return of six-foot four-inch Stinson, second team all- 
rebounds 
American last year, to the lineup, the Southerners are controlling/ 

much more than in the earlier contests, thus giving Shoaff and 

Sebastian time to concentrate on their passing, which they did last 

week when they gave local fans an exhibition, the equal of which has 

not been seen in these parts for a long time. 

Also rounding into top-notch shape are Ruzich and Hall, both 

showing up well under fire in the Indiana u tate game. 

Following the Yuletide tourney, the Maroons will be at home to 
Evansville College on January 7, Western Illinois State Teachers on 
the 11 (Conference), and Southeastern Missouri ^tate on the 14, 
before traveling to Evansville to return the Hoosiers call on the 16. 

Tournament olay in Kansas City will get under way on Friday, 
December 27, at 7 pm. f^ 

mm 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■■■■^■■■■■■■■■■^■■■■■{^■■■■■■M 



§PECIaL TO SOUTHERN ILLIfoUlJ LUlLIbS 12-16-46 

Carbondale, 111., Dec. -DuQuoin High School walked off 
with almost all honors in the day-long Speech Meet last Saturday 
at Southern Illinois Normal University. 

The meet wa.s sponsored by the University's nev/ speech department 
and two student forensic grouj>s in honor of high school speech 
students. 

Four high schools participated--DuQuoin with 43 delegates; 
iiugusta Tilghman High School of Paducah, Ky. , with 17 delegates; 
Newton with 16; and Sparta with 3. 

Augusta Tilghman High School took first place in the discussion 
contest, as Clara June Killer of that school was rated "superior. " 
Bob Smith of Newton, Marilyn Friedman of ^agusta Tilghman and ! .. 
Particia Harvey of Newton were all rated "excellent" in this event. 

DuQuoin took almost a clean sweep in the other six events, 
although Miss Miller of Augusta Tilghman took third place in the 
original oratory event. 

DuQuoin 1 s winners were: Original oratory — first place, 
James Warner; second, Gene Blanchard. 

Poetry Reading — first place, Rae June Decker; second, Bill 
Leeman; third, Ann Gaerig. 

Extemporaneous speech — first, Gordon Linkon; second, Bill 
Leeman; third, Ellen Forrester. 

Oratorical Declamation — first, Charles Toler; second, Matena 
Notaras; third (tie) Sharon Womach and Doris Mauthe. 

Humorous Declamation—first, James Werner; second, Doris 
Fithian; third, Betty Schenk. 

Dramatic Declamation — first, Rae June Decker; second, Joan 
Gutridge; third, Gordon Linkon. 

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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



12-16-46 



Carbondale, 111,, Bee. -Gift ' o$ number o£ ; rare books, chiefly 
medical volumes, to the Southern Illinois Normal University Museum has 
been announced by John .alien, Museum curator. 

The volumes came from Dr. J. J. Rendleman of Cairo, who attended 
Southern 70 years ago and who has been a practicing physician for three 
score years. 

The books include Pricniples and Practice of Surgery , by Pirrie, 
published in 1#52; Stewart's Elemen t s of the Philosophy of the Human 
Kind , published in 1$0$; Cooper's Anatomy and Surgical Treatment of 
Hernia , 18$4; Wilson's Human anatomy. 1$59; Hooper's Medical 
Dictionary . 1824; Dunglison's Therapeutics and Mate: ia Medica : 
Playfair's The Science and Practice of Midwifery , 1376. 

Another of the medical volumes is Watson's Principles and Practice 
of Physic . 1&5&, long considered the outstanding text in its field 
and w idely used. It is still interesting to anyone wishing to learn of 
the development of medicine, according to Mr. Allen. 

Dr. Rendleman also presented the Museum a H istory of Alexander, 
Union and Pulaski Counties , by Perrin, published in 18$3, a na re and 
much sought book on the Southern Illinois region. 

Several other objects of historical and scientific interest were 
also given to the Museum by the Cairo physician, among them a walking 
stick made from an unusual vine growth of the Cairo area; and excellent 
specimen of Balsa wood; and an ostrich egg. 

Dr. ftendleman f irst enrolled « at Southern Illinois Normal Universi 

70 years ago this montfr, in December, 1&76, and was last a student here 

in i860. Prom 1S81 to I8S3 he taught in the Jackson County schools, 

and then went to medical school. 

"He knows much of the early history of this school and was , 
acquainted with many of the persons who guided its early history, "Mr, 
Allen explained. "He gave us considerable information concerning the 
beginnings of our Museum, and of the work of Dr. Cyrus Thomas, who a .■ 
afterwards became nationally known as an entomologist." 

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- Southern Illinois 

__________ Normal University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

lorena drummond, ed. mmmMmammaBtammmmmmmmaBmMMam 



12-17-46 

Carbondale, 111., Dec. -After losing three out of four on the 
road, the Southern Illinois Normal University Maroons will take the 
floor to do battle with Arkansas State Wednesday night before a 
friendly home crowd as they try to change their luck, and also keep 
their record of only one defeat in two years on the Carbondale 
hardwood intact. 

Head Basketball Coach Lynn C. Holder's charges started their 
disastrous journey by invading St. Louis where the Billikens nosed 
them out 63-57. The following night found them guests of Washington 
University where they put down a last minute Bear uprising 47-43» 

Failing to db very well in the west, the Maroons tried the south 

the past week, and the results were worse. The Western Kentucky 

Teachers trounced them 62-4$, and Loyola of the South Wolf pack defeated 

them 52-47. 

Thus the Holder-men, with a three and three record will step )n 
the court to face the Arkansas State Indians in their first collegiate 
home game of the season. 

The Redskins record show them as in-and-out team, always dangerous 
The Arkansasians have a two cand two record as they wing into their 
mid-west trip, which 'besides Southern, will include Washington 
University and Concordia Seminary. 

The Maroons-Arkansas State tilt is slated to get underway at 
8:15 in the men f s gymnasium. The gate will open at 6 p.m. and admissic, 
will be on a first-come first served basis. The preliminary game 
will start at 7 p.m. 



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Southern Illinois 

______ ^_« Normal University 

Information Service CARBONDALE ' "■ L1N01S 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 12-17-46 

Carbondale, 111., Dec. - "You have bten assigned an apartment 
in the now housing unit" was the good news that went this week to 99 
! married veterans at Southern Illinois Normal University. 

The housing committee, composed- of several faculty members, student 
veterans and non-University veterans organizations, has examined the 
credentials of 115 applicants for the apartments, and has ranked the 
applicants in order of their need* 

Only two of the applicants were ineligible on the basis of need, 
according to Van a. Buboltz, housing project supervisor, and Mrs. Mabel 
Pulliam, housing counselor. 

The remaining 14 applicants have been placed on the waiting list, 
and will be moved up in order as vacancies occur. Hereafter, applicants 

I who meet eligibility ree qui r erne nts will be placed on the waiting list in 
order of their applications, Buboltz said. 
Latest advice to University officials from Robert West, Federal 
Public Hjusing authority supervisor on the project, is tnat 45 of the 
apartments will be ready for occupancy in about two weeks,, out not 
before January 3» 

I The first 45 veterans and their families are therefore expecting 
to move in early in the New Year. 

The apartments a re two-bedroom units, e .chwith a living room, 
kitchen, bath, and three closets. Each will be furnished with ice box 



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gas stove, four single beds, m.ttresses, mattress mats, dinette set with 
four chairs, two occasional ch.iirs, mirror, two chests ji drawers. 

Rental rates for the apartments have been fixed on a sliding scale 
dependent upon the individual family's income — .me-fourth of the monthly 
family income — although a ceiling o± '^1+0 and a floor of .',,.22.50 have been 
established, plus a £>6 charge for furniture rental per month. E: ch 
tenant will be subject to paying a proportional share of any overrun on 
utility charges for the whole project. 

The housing project here, constructed jointly by the University arc 
the Federal Public Housing authority, provides a total of 105 apartmants 
Under the Lanham Act. up to 5 per cent of the apartments in any college 
housing unit ma;/ be used for non-veteran faculty families. The Universj 
therefore, will house 99 veterans and their families, including three 
faculty members who -re veterans, and the remaining six will be used for 
non-veteran faculty. 

Names of the veterans to occupy the new apartments will be made 
available later this wee, Mr. Buboltz said, as soon as all have notified 
the housing committee they would accept their assignments. If any decid 
not to accept, tiie next applicants in line will h. ve the opportunity to 
mjve in. 






-V. 



Information Service 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



12-17-46 



Carbondale, 111., Dec. - Three terras of debaters 1 rom Southern 
Illinois Normal University will enter a debate tournament with 
Southeastern Missouri State Teachers College, Cape Girardeau, Thursday, 
Dec. 19, Dr. P. Merville Larson, coach, has announced. 

The three pair of debaters will include: Lewis Hammack of Sparta 
and John Rendleman of rt nna; Robert Eaton ji Tamaroa and Sill Kozyak 
of Granite City; Louis Brusatti of Mmrphysboro and Earl Rudesill of 
Fairfield. 

Subject f or t he Cape Girardeau tournament will be: "Resolved, 
That labor should have a direct share in management of industry." 

The Southern debaters will also participate in a debate tournament 
at Illinois State Normal University Jan. 10-11. 

>L 'I >L 

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Carbnodale, 111., Dec. - a plowshare from one of the most 
primitive plows used in pioneer Southern Illinois has been presented to 
the Southern Illinois Normal University Museum by John LI. Dewey, circuit 
clerk at Cairo 

This iron plow point was found on the bank of a branch by Thebes, 
in the western part of Alexander County, according to John Allen, 
museum curator, who plans to reconstruct the long-disintegrated w ooden 
parts from existing dra ings of t^is type ji implement. 

"I have seen only 'jne like it, and that was in Henry Ford's R'useum. 
Mr. Allen said. 

Mr, Dewey, who has held office for many years and knows much of th<: 
history of Alexander County, also gave the University museum and ~ v 
excellent specimen of ''petrified 1 ' wood. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CARBONDALR ILL "' ols 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■■■■■■^^^^^^^^^^■■i 



Special to Dailies 

Carbondale, 111., Doc. -Research, one of the distinguishing 
functions of a university, is getting under way at Southern Illinois 
University. 

Six research projects to be conducted by faculty members have been 
approved by President Chester F. Lay, who authorized grants ranging 
from #15 to ijp400 to enable the investigators to secure materials, 
student assistants, and in some cases to travel over the area. 

The projects include (1) study of practical effects of a new 
peach tree spray; (2) survey of the clays of Southern Illinois with a 
view to their use in development of a ceramics industry; (3) collection 
of Southern Illinois proverbs; (4) a survey of the educational resources 
of Southern Illinois; (5) a compilation of the history of the colorful 
''showboats 1 ' 1 , many of which have plied the Mississippi; and (6) a 
research project on 20th century drama. 

To encourage research, the University has during the past two years 
allocated funds to provide materials and assistance for faculty members 
who wished to conduct original investigations. 

During the next biennium, if the University's request for a four 
and one-half million dollar appropriation is approved by the General 
Assembly, larger quantities of money will be available for regional 
and other research, President Lay said. Among the contemplated new 
fields for investigation are horticulture, anthropology and archaeology, 
botany, museum materials of all kinds. It is proposed to secure 
research specialists in these subjects if funds can be obtained. 

Research projects autnorized this week will be carried on by Dr. 
Walter B. T .7elch, associate professor and chairman of the botany 
department; Ben P. Watkins, assistant professor of art; hiss Frances 
Barbour, associate professor of English; Dr. Douglas E. Lawson, 
professor of English; Dr. Harold E. Briggs, professor and chairman of 
the history department; and miss Winifred Burns, assistant professor 
of English. 

Dr. Welch will study the effect of naphthaleneacetic acid and its 



L 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



-2- 

socium salt on the flowering of peaches. He has already tvd.ce applied 
the acid to three plots of trees in three orchards at different :a 
localities from Belleville to Metropolis, and plans to make two more 
applications. 

Watkins will test specimen samples of Southern Illinois clays to 
determine their suitability for casting, pressing and other methods of 
fabrication into pottery and other ceramic forms; their firing 
characteristics; adaptability for glazes and other finishes; creative 
and industrial possibilities. He proposes to compile trie material he 
accomulates into several articles and a book. 

Miss Barbour will collect folklore expressions that are indigenous 
to this area for inclusion in a Dictionary of American Proverbial Lore 
which is being compiled by the American Dialect Society. 

Dr. Lawson, with Dr. Robert Browne of the University of Illinois, 
has been assigned the work of surveying and reporting on the educational 
resources of the lower 16 counties of Southern Illinois as a part of 
the cooperative study of Southern Illinois being conducted by Southern 
Illinois Normal University and the University of Illinois. 

Dr. Briggs, who has already written extensively on the history of 
early theatrical ventures in this country, will compile a history of 
showboats, a subject that has never before been attempted. He explains 
that Southern is ideally located for the conduct of such a study, since 
many of the showboats have traveled up and down the Lississippi River 
near here. 

Miss Burns will conduct an investigation into the sources of 
inspiration for the playwright Pinero's women characters, the material 
she acquires to be written as an article for publication in a scholarly 
periodical. 

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Southern Illinois 

—^_^__^__ Normal University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. MMIMWMHIIHfl 'HUT I TM B— Bgga— gBB 



12-19-46 



Special to Dailies and Weeklies 



Carbondale, 111., Dec. - Fifteen students at Southern 
Illinois Normal University have been notified of their inclusion in 
the 1946-V7 edition of the National Publication, Who's Who Among 
Students in Ame ri c an Universities and Colleges * 

They are: Kathryn Alley of Sparta, Charles Beatty of 
Carbondale, Leedio Cabutti of Johnston City, Ted Cain of Eldorado', 
Avis Frank of Carbondale, June Fulkerson of Carbondale, Imogene 
Gray of Granite City, Jean Holmes of E. St. Louis, David Konney of 
Carbondale, Bill Mai ins ky of Flora, Barbara Melvin of DuQuoin, 
Evelyn Parker of Bluford, Catherine Sullivan of Harrisburg, John 
Mulkin of Herrin, and Julius Swayne of DuQuoin. 

Six other students named in last year's edition who are still 
in school will automatically be included: Richard Avis of Johnston 
City, Helen DeRuntz of Granite City, Die it Harmon of Granite City, 
James McGee of Granite City, Sam Milosevich of Zeigler, and Opal Ruff 
of :.Shelbyville. 

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Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CARBONDALE - ILLINOIS 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■^^■^^^^^^^^^^■■^^M 



12-19-46 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies & Weeklies 

Carbondale, 111., Dec. - A new radio series, broadcast five 
times a week, has been set up by Southern Illinois Normal University 
to be aired over Station WCIL, Carbondale, starting January 6, Miss 
Lorena Drummond, director of the University Information Service, has 
announced. 

The new program series will place heavy ernpha sis on student 
personalities and student activities. 

Scheduled each Monday through Friday every week that the 
University is in session, the programs will be broadcast from 2:15 
to 2:30 p. m. 

Students from speech classes will serve as announcers for all 
programs, a new group taking the assignment each month. 

To be known as '"University Time," the series will provide a 
variety of entertainment and informational programs including: 
Mondays, "Music Is Yours," presented by the music department and 
largely featuring student groups such as the band, orchestra and 
chorus; Tuesdays, student newscast; Wednesdays, " Campus Chatter," 
featuring student activities and organizations; Thursdays, "Little 
Theater," a radio play; Fridays, "Meet the Faculty," informal talks, 
round table discussions and interviews featuring faculty members on 
subjects of timely interest, 

"We are happy to launch this new series of programs on a station 
which reaches the entire area of Southern Illinois which the 
University serves," Miss Drummond said. "This series will afford us 
an excellent opportunity to show the parents of University students, 
our alumni and other friends of the University how students are getting 
along, what they are learning in the classroom and in extracurricular 
activities. 

"Im the- Friday programs, 'Meet the Faculty,' we propose to 
present informative discussions which will be of real value and 
interest to the people of this area," 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Release Wednesday 



Carbondale, 111., Jan. -A return enlargement with Southeastern 
Missouri State University is on the docket for Southern Illinois 
Normal University Wednesday night as they travel down to Cape 
Girardeau to give the Indians a chance to even the season's count. 

The Maroons and the Redskins tangled previously this year, with 
the Illinoisians taking a thrilling 42-39 victory before local fans. 

Coach Lynn Holder's Maroons are now sole possessors of the Illinois 
Intercollegiate Athletic Conference lead, after defeating Northern 
Illinois Normal last Saturday night 62-53, and will need this Cape 
game to keep them in peak form to take on State Normal next Saturday 
night at Normal. 

Holder will probably throw at the Indians his five usual mainstays 
Johnny Sebastian of Odin and Oliver Shoaff of lit. Carmel at forward, 
Quentin Stinson of Eldorado at center, and Bob Colborn of Flora and 
Gene Hall of Galatia at guard. 

The play-by-play account of this game will be carried by radio 
station WJPF of -Herrin, with Les Thrasher describing the action. 

The Maroons next home game will be on February 5 } when they play 
host to the University of Chicago five in a non-conference contest. 

irififft 






Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 






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Information Service 
Southern Illinois Normal University 



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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Special to Southern Il-linois Dailies 



12-23-46 



Carbondale, 111., Dec. — Prairie Du Rocher's famous 
La-Gui-Annee celebration on New Year's Eve this year will be 
permanently and completely recorded in pictures and on records by 
John W. Allen, curator of the museum of Southern Illinois Normal 
University. 

The La-Gui-Annee ceremony has bo^n observed in Prairie du Rocher 
since 1722, and for several years has been led by Captain Noah Duclos. 
As the custom has been carried on in America on Ncvv Year's Eve in the 
oldest French settlements up to the present date, a band of 
masqueraders composed of the young men of the town gather at sunset 
in some secret place dressed in grotesque costumes, and from there, 
steal upon the homes to surprise the residents by their serenading. 

The song, La-Gui-Annee, is repeated to t he accompaniment of 
fiddles until they are invited in and served with refreshments. Before 
midnight the townspeople have joined the band, and all gather in the 
town hall where the ball is opened by selection of the masqueraders 
of partners from the ladies in the audience, which is a great honor. 
This dancing and feasting is carried on until the bells ring for early 
mass celebration on New Year's Day. 

(more ) 



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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



-2 

The origin of the ancient song La-Gui-Annee dates back to the 
history of the durids in Brittany, and was brought "to America by 
the first emigrants from France. While the druidical worship 
dominated, Brittany people performed the practice at the end of each 
year of gathering gui, or mistletoe, for the New Year, the druid 
priests ringing as they discharged this sacred duty in groves of 
oak trees. Hence came the name Gui-Annee, from gui-de-l T an-neuf , 
meaning mistle — of--the year--new. 

Allen, museum curator, says that the University already has one 
recording of the song sung by the ^0-year-old father of Percy Clerc 
of Prairie du Rocher, made by Allen, and David Mcintosh, associate 
professor of music at Southern. 

On the trip which Allen will make to the old French settlement 
this week, he v/ill make arrangements for complete sound recording and 
pictures of the entire celebration. He will be assisted by Julius 
Swaync, University s tudent from Du Quoin who is Allen's assistant 
in the museum. 



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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 

Carbondale, 111. December -On the morning of December 26, 
while everyone else is sleeping off the effects of a hearty Christmas, 
Basketball Coach Lynn C. Holder and his Southern Illinois Normal 
University cagers will embarking on a journey that will t...ke them to 
Kansas City, where they vail make up one-fourth of the entries in the 
annual Yii,e tide tournament held there. 

Although this is the first entry for the Maroons in this par- 
ticular tourney, they are sure to receive a warm reception in the 
twin cities, as they captured the fancy of the fans last March by 
their fast breaking type of play as they won the National Inter- 
collegiate crown. 

Southern will, more or less, be representing the east in this 
classic as the three other teams, Rockhurst College, Colorado A. & 14. , 
and St. Mary's, are from Kansas City, Hesperus, Colorado, and Los 
Angeles, respectively. 

St. Mary's and Rockhurst will o_ en the festivities on Friday 
night at 7 pm. , while Southern and Colorado will vie in the later 
contest. On Saturday, the two losers will meet in the curtain- 
raiser, while the two first round victors will tangle for the 
tournament championship. 

Holder has announced that he will take ten men to represent the 
Maroons and White.. They are Johnny °ebastian, of Odin, 01i¥er 
Shoaff of Mt, Carmel, Quentin Stinson of Eldorado, Bud V/ilson of 
Fairfield, Bill Miilspaugh of Norris City, Bob Colborn of Flora, 
John Ruzich of Johnston u ity, Gene Hall of Galatia, Charles Goss of 
Marion, and Leedio Cabutti of Johnston City. 

The Maroons are currently riding on the crest of a two g.me 
winning streak, their season's record being five wins and three 
defeats. Their victories were over Onized Class, Chef ford 
Manufacturers, Washington University, Arkansas State, and Indiana 
State, while they have been knocked off by St. Louis University, 
Loyola University of the South, and "western Aentucky ^tate Teachers 

Local fans will have a chance to see the Southerners in action 
again on January 7, when they play host to Lvansville College of 
Evansville, Indiana. G me time is set for 3:15 pnu 



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